Videos | Cybersecurity | December 12, 2017

VIDEO: Cybersecurity in the Medical Imaging Department

J. Anthony Seibert, Ph.D., professor and chair of informatics, University of California Davis, describes the security vulnerabilities specific to radiology departments and how they can be combated at the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

Read the articles “Building A Cybersecurity Team in Radiology,” and “Healthcare's Growing Cybersecurity Threats.”

Recent Videos View all 517 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Radiation Oncology | October 11, 2019

Lorraine Drapek, DNP, nurse practitioner, radiation oncology, GI service, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the roles of advanced practice providers in radiation therapy. She spoke on this topic at ASTRO 2019 at a session that reviewed the integration of APPs into radiation oncology practice to enhance clinical care. This includes but is not limited to: on-treatment management, symptom and acute toxicity management during treatment, inpatient consultations, procedural assistance, treatment planning, follow-up, survivorship and research.

Radiation Therapy | October 08, 2019

Kristin Higgins, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology, Emory Clinic at the Winship Cancer Institute, explains considerations when treating previous radiation oncology patients again at the same or other tumor sites. She spoke on this topic at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2019 annual meeting in Chicago.

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Prostate Cancer | September 30, 2019

Bill Hartsell, M.D., medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in Warrenville, Ill., discusses the outcomes of a trial investigating the use of a hydrogel spacer to hold the rectum away from the prostate during radiation therapy treatments. The trial was presented at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting. 

Read the article "Augmenix Announces Positive Three-Year Long-Term Data for SpaceOAR Hydrogel Spacer"

Read the article "Latest Advances in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy"

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Sponsored Videos View all 141 items

Quality Assurance (QA) | September 04, 2019

Modus QA is proud to offer the world's first MR-safe Motion QA phantom for simulation, planning and delivery applications. Watch the video to see how the integrated design saves setup time and increases operational efficiency.

View the video here: 

Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019

At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features.

 

Related content:

itnTV "Conversations": The Accuray Philosophy

 

Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019

CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.

Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System.

 

 

Information Technology | April 17, 2019

With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers' investments and best of breed systems. 

Technology Reports View all 9 items

Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018

Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.

For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:

Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray Philosophy

ASTRO Puts Patients First

Technology Reports | April 01, 2018

ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:

Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For Radiology

Value in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of Radiology

VIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging
 

Conference Coverage View all 409 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Radiation Oncology | October 11, 2019

Lorraine Drapek, DNP, nurse practitioner, radiation oncology, GI service, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the roles of advanced practice providers in radiation therapy. She spoke on this topic at ASTRO 2019 at a session that reviewed the integration of APPs into radiation oncology practice to enhance clinical care. This includes but is not limited to: on-treatment management, symptom and acute toxicity management during treatment, inpatient consultations, procedural assistance, treatment planning, follow-up, survivorship and research.

Radiation Therapy | October 08, 2019

Kristin Higgins, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology, Emory Clinic at the Winship Cancer Institute, explains considerations when treating previous radiation oncology patients again at the same or other tumor sites. She spoke on this topic at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2019 annual meeting in Chicago.

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Prostate Cancer | September 30, 2019

Bill Hartsell, M.D., medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in Warrenville, Ill., discusses the outcomes of a trial investigating the use of a hydrogel spacer to hold the rectum away from the prostate during radiation therapy treatments. The trial was presented at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting. 

Read the article "Augmenix Announces Positive Three-Year Long-Term Data for SpaceOAR Hydrogel Spacer"

Read the article "Latest Advances in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy"

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Radiation Oncology View all 105 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Radiation Oncology | October 11, 2019

Lorraine Drapek, DNP, nurse practitioner, radiation oncology, GI service, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the roles of advanced practice providers in radiation therapy. She spoke on this topic at ASTRO 2019 at a session that reviewed the integration of APPs into radiation oncology practice to enhance clinical care. This includes but is not limited to: on-treatment management, symptom and acute toxicity management during treatment, inpatient consultations, procedural assistance, treatment planning, follow-up, survivorship and research.

Radiation Therapy | October 08, 2019

Kristin Higgins, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology, Emory Clinic at the Winship Cancer Institute, explains considerations when treating previous radiation oncology patients again at the same or other tumor sites. She spoke on this topic at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2019 annual meeting in Chicago.

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Prostate Cancer | September 30, 2019

Bill Hartsell, M.D., medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in Warrenville, Ill., discusses the outcomes of a trial investigating the use of a hydrogel spacer to hold the rectum away from the prostate during radiation therapy treatments. The trial was presented at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting. 

Read the article "Augmenix Announces Positive Three-Year Long-Term Data for SpaceOAR Hydrogel Spacer"

Read the article "Latest Advances in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy"

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Radiology Imaging View all 290 items

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and auto-contours them as the first step in creating radiation oncology treatment plans. This example of a segmented prostate computed tomography (CT) scan being used to plan radiotherapy was created without any human intervention. It was demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

This example shows OAR Space hydrogel (outlined in blue) injected to create space between the prostate and the rectum to prevent damage to that radiation sensitive structure. The gel is hard to identify on the CT scan because it looks like part of the rectum or prostate. But the softwares AI has been trained to identify it when present.

The DLCExpert software was cleared by the FDA in July 2018 and was first shown at ASTRO 2018. It automatically identifies anatomical structures and contours them to save staff time. The files created by the software are vendor neutral and can be imported into any vendor’s treatment planning system. Read more about this software. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is a lung cancer tumor radiotherapy treatment plan for the Accuray CyberKnife system demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. The blue lines are the radiation beam lines that are shot from different positions to all intersect in the tumor to deliver the prescribed amount of radiation and prevent damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The beams also are planned around the critical structure organs near the target tumor to limit their dose. The organs are color coded to differentiate them on the treatment plan and to help with the estimated radiation dose each receives based on the plan. After the plan is optimized, it is fed into the radiotherapy treatment system computer to deliver the treatment once the patient is positioned on the treatment table exactly as they are in the CT scans used to create the plan. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

 

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | August 21, 2019

This is a quick walk around of a mobile 32-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner used for surgery, brachytherapy and proton therapy on display by Mobius Imaging at the 2019 American Association Of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) meeting. The system simply plugs into a standard wall outlet and all of the required hardware and software is built into the gantry. There is no need for an equipment closet, cabinet or server tower. The company said the CT system was created by some of the same developers who built the O-arm mobile CT system, but they said this CT scanner is much more compact.

 

Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019

Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.

The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.

The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.

Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1: Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System

Interact with a 360 photo of a Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Fluoroscopy imaging system
 

 

Molecular Imaging View all 22 items

Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019

Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting

 

Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

New PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition

25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology Articles

Recent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology

SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018

This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It's CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.

Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” 

Read the article "Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition."

Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018

Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.

Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital

 

Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:

Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

A Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

Radioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck Tumors

NCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment

 

 

Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017

Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article "Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging."

 

Information Technology View all 221 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and auto-contours them as the first step in creating radiation oncology treatment plans. This example of a segmented prostate computed tomography (CT) scan being used to plan radiotherapy was created without any human intervention. It was demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

This example shows OAR Space hydrogel (outlined in blue) injected to create space between the prostate and the rectum to prevent damage to that radiation sensitive structure. The gel is hard to identify on the CT scan because it looks like part of the rectum or prostate. But the softwares AI has been trained to identify it when present.

The DLCExpert software was cleared by the FDA in July 2018 and was first shown at ASTRO 2018. It automatically identifies anatomical structures and contours them to save staff time. The files created by the software are vendor neutral and can be imported into any vendor’s treatment planning system. Read more about this software. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Radiology Business | August 02, 2019

Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS)artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. 

Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019.

Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019

Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

Learn more about how this technology works in the VIDEO: Editor's Choice of the Most Innovative Technologies at AAPM 2018.

Find more news and videos from AAPM.

 

Women's Health View all 62 items

Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019

In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.

Read the article "How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health"

Read the article "FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement"

Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting

Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019

At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.

Read the article "Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care"

Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha.

Mammography | April 15, 2019

Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.

Read the article "FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement"

RSNA | April 03, 2019

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.

Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.