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VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Automatic Contouring and Segmentation For Radiotherapy

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and auto-contours them as the first step in creating radiation oncology treatment plans. This example of a segmented prostate computed tomography (CT) scan being used to plan radiotherapy was created without any human intervention. It was demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

This example shows OAR Space hydrogel (outlined in blue) injected to create space between the prostate and the rectum to prevent damage to that radiation sensitive structure. The gel is hard to identify on the CT scan because it looks like part of the rectum or prostate. But the softwares AI has been trained to identify it when present.

The DLCExpert software was cleared by the FDA in July 2018 and was first shown at ASTRO 2018. It automatically identifies anatomical structures and contours them to save staff time. The files created by the software are vendor neutral and can be imported into any vendor’s treatment planning system. Read more about this software. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Radiology Imaging

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and auto-contours them as the first step in creating radiation oncology treatment plans. This example of a segmented prostate computed tomography (CT) scan being used to plan radiotherapy was created without any human intervention. It was demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

This example shows OAR Space hydrogel (outlined in blue) injected to create space between the prostate and the rectum to prevent damage to that radiation sensitive structure. The gel is hard to identify on the CT scan because it looks like part of the rectum or prostate. But the softwares AI has been trained to identify it when present.

The DLCExpert software was cleared by the FDA in July 2018 and was first shown at ASTRO 2018. It automatically identifies anatomical structures and contours them to save staff time. The files created by the software are vendor neutral and can be imported into any vendor’s treatment planning system. Read more about this software. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is a lung cancer tumor radiotherapy treatment plan for the Accuray CyberKnife system demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. The blue lines are the radiation beam lines that are shot from different positions to all intersect in the tumor to deliver the prescribed amount of radiation and prevent damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The beams also are planned around the critical structure organs near the target tumor to limit their dose. The organs are color coded to differentiate them on the treatment plan and to help with the estimated radiation dose each receives based on the plan. After the plan is optimized, it is fed into the radiotherapy treatment system computer to deliver the treatment once the patient is positioned on the treatment table exactly as they are in the CT scans used to create the plan. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

 

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | August 21, 2019

This is a quick walk around of a mobile 32-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner used for surgery, brachytherapy and proton therapy on display by Mobius Imaging at the 2019 American Association Of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) meeting. The system simply plugs into a standard wall outlet and all of the required hardware and software is built into the gantry. There is no need for an equipment closet, cabinet or server tower. The company said the CT system was created by some of the same developers who built the O-arm mobile CT system, but they said this CT scanner is much more compact.

 

Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019

Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.

The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.

The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.

Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:

Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System

CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019

This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.

The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.

The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.

It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.

It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.

Find more information on this system in these related articles:

New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the Market

New Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor

 

 

CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019

This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.

One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.

Find more information on this system in these related articles:

New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the Market

New Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor

 

 

Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019

Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.

Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA.

Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019

Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting. 

 

Find more SCCT news and videos

Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019

Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.

Find more SCCT news and videos

Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019

Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting.

 

Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:

VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.

CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor Assessment

ACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018

VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.

 

Find more SCCT news and videos

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019

Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president's theme for the 2019 meeting - VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.

Find more news and videos from AAPM.

 

Related CT Technology Content:

New CT Technology Entering the Market

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.

Expanding Applications for Computed Tomography

VIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., direct

VIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.

FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?

VIDEO: ITN Editor's Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018

VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.

VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist Workflow

Managing CT Radiation Dose

VIDEO: ITN Editor's Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017

New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017

VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.

Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.

VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D. 

AAPM | July 29, 2019

Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.
 

Find more news and videos from AAPM.

AAPM | July 23, 2019

Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the "building bridges" theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. 

This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.

She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation's life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. 

Find more news and videos from AAPM.

CT Angiography (CTA) | July 19, 2019

Ron Blankstein, M.D., director of cardiac computed tomography, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and associate professor of medicine and radiology, Harvard Medical School, offers an overview of the recent trends in cardiac CT and some of the new highlights at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. He said key topics included integration of artificial intelligence into CT systems, the integration of CT calcium scoring into the 2018 American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol management guidelines, structural heart assessments for transcatheter valve and left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion, and sessions with paertner societies that explain the roll of CT in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology.

Find more SCCT news and videos

Computed Tomography (CT) | July 19, 2019

Quynh Truong, M.D., MPH, associate professor of radiology and medicine at Weill Cornell and director of cardiac CT, NewYork Presbyterian Hospital, offers 10 tips to help improve image quality for cardiovascular computed tomography (CTA) exams. She spoke on this topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting.

 

Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019

Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children's Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference

Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.

Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes.

 

Related content:

VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.

VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018

VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice

Artificial Intelligence | June 21, 2019

Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D., Radnet vice president and chief technology officer, discusses some of the artificial intelligence (AI) products in radiology that are now commercially available and how AI developments will impact PET, MRI and CT imaging. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AI-Med conference.

He said AI is helping medical imaging in the following areas:
   • Identify urgent findings and flagging these on the top of worklists.
   • Computer aided detection capabilities that go beyond the traditional to improve efficiency, boost diagnosis and highlight unexpected findings. 
   • Improving diagnostic image reconstruction
   • Tools to enhance the speed, resolution, radiation dose and overall quality of advanced imaging.

Learn more about what AI tools vendors are developing to help medical imaging in the following links:

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018

VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging — Interview with Sudhen Desai, M.D.

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018

VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.

VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial Intelligence

VIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here — Interview with Michael Recht, M.D.

 

Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019

This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at Henry Ford Medical Center — Cottage. The system has been in service for about two years. The walk through shows the entry way into the vault and the warnings about entering an MRI environment. Anyone who enters the treatment room must undergo a metal detector scan first to make sure all ferrous metal is removed.

Read more about the center's first year experience with the system.

Find more Henry Ford Hospital related content.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 21, 2019

This is a quick look inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) neuro-interventional suite at Henry Ford Hospital in Detriot, Mich. This neuro-procedure room connects through a door to a traditional operating room and the patient can be transferred using a trolley cot system to move between the two rooms. The MRI is a Philips 1.5T Achieva and the MRI suite includes MRI-safe surgical instruments, furniture and anesthesia system.

Find more Henry Ford Hospital related content.

 

Digital Radiography (DR) | May 20, 2019

This is a quick walk-around video showing the Siemens Healthineers Multix Impact digital radiography (DR) room X-ray system at RSNA 2018. The system offers an intuitive operating system to help improve productivity. The in-room touch user interface on the tube allows the technologist to remain at the patient’s side. And when unable to be at the patient’s side, the technologist is able to monitor and optimize positioning from the control room via the system’s patient positioning camera, potentially reducing repeat imaging and unnecessary patient dose. Lights at the top of the X-ray system automatically indicate it the patient anatomy is aligned properly with the exam type the technologist chose for optimal imaging to reduce the need for retakes. 

The Multix Impact also offers an intuitive user interface and graphical organ program selection. The positioning guide display on both the in-room touch user interface and the workstation supports precise, consistent patient positioning. Advanced motorization and tracking reduce the physical exertion of technologists and help prevent repetitive stress injuries.

The FDA cleared the system In January 2019. 

Advanced Visualization | May 16, 2019

This is an example of how virtual reality is being used in neuro-radiology to better evaluate patients using advanced imaging. This dataset shows a patient's brain MRI with fused tractography imaging for pre-operative planning. This was part of a 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) hands-on session by Vinodh Kumar, M.D., and Komal Shah, M.D., associate professors of radiology at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Watch the VIDEO: Using Virtual and Augmented Reality to Examine Brain Anatomy and Pathology — an interview with Vinodh Kumar, M.D., and Komal Shah, M.D.

Read the related article Virtual Reality Boosts Revenues and Patient Understanding.

Find more RSNA 2018 coverage.

 

Cardiac Imaging | April 26, 2019

Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director of structural heart imaging, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., explains how patient survival depends on keeping the left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) clear and using 3-D imaging to predict what the neo-LVOT will look like prior to transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. The close proximity between the aortic and mitral valves in the left ventricle anatomy makes it critical to assess any mitral valve overhang that will obstruct blood flow out of the left ventricle. This issue has been raised in several cardiovascular imaging structural heart intervention planning sessions at conferences over the past two years, most notably at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT).

Read the related article Interventional Imagers: The Conductors of the Heart Team Orchestra, which Wang helped author.

Watch the related VIDEO: Overview of the Henry Ford Hospital Structural Heart Program.

 

Additional articles and videos on Henry Ford Hospital 

Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019

In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.

Read the article "How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health"

Read the article "FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement"

Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting

Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019

At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.

Read the article "Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care"

Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha.

Mammography | April 15, 2019

Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.

Read the article "FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement"

RSNA | April 03, 2019

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.

Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018. 

 

 

 

Radiology Business | March 26, 2019

William Pinsky, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist and CEO of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), and Mandeep Mehra, M.D., medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Heart and Vascular Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, explain the U.S. doctor shortage and how foreign doctors help fill the gap.

According to 2017 data provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), 40 percent of interventional cardiologists, 30 percent of cardiovascular disease specialists, and 26 percent of pediatric cardiologists in the United States are international medical graduates (IMGs). However, as the physician shortage continues to impact primary care doctors, psychiatrists, OB/GYNs, among others, the U.S. also expects to see a shortage of cardiologists within the next 10 years, according to a spotlight cardiology study issued by the professional services firm PYA, which specialized in healthcare consulting.

The interview was shot at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 25, 2019

Max Wintermark, M.D., chief of neuroradiology at Stanford University Medical Center, discusses the latest technologies to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans on display at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting.

Women's Health | March 25, 2019

Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis.

Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019

Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.

Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019

Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting

 

Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

New PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition

25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology Articles

Recent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology

Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019

At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.

Related content:

Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI

RSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing

PACS | March 05, 2019

Cree Gaskin, M.D., professor, vice chair and associate chief medical officer, University of Virginia Health System, explains how new technology can be used to improve radiology reports without additional workload. His health system uses a new generation integrated RIS/PACS system that allows URL links and new graphical data presentations to be embedded into radiology reports to make them more interactive. This information can include quantifications, key images from the exam, access to full datasets, 3-D reconstructions and ability to immediately link to prior exams. He spoke is sessions on this topic at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) conference.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

This is an example of a new endoscopic virtual peritoneal inflation tool on the patient's computed tomography (CT) imaging to aid in pre-procedural planning of endoscopic procedures. This is a new software feature on Fujifilm's Synapse 3D advanced visualization software released at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting. The software also enables 3-D imaging for surgical pre-procedural planning to assess the best entry points and angles. 

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

Orthopedic Imaging | March 05, 2019

This is an example of a 3-D printed pelvis that had multiple hip fractures and a second printed pelvis is from a post surgical repair CT scan, showing the pins and plates in pink. This was on display at the GE Healthcare booth at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 conference. The files for printing were created from the CT datasets using the AW Advanced Visualization software.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Advanced Visualization | March 05, 2019

This is an example of a new endoscopic 3-D imaging simulator created from a patient's computed tomography (CT) scan using Fujifilm's Synapse 3D advanced visualization software. The feature was released at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS)  2019 meeting. The software enables surgical pre-procedural planning to assess the best entry points and angles. The software also enables users to perform a virtual peritoneal inflation using the advanced imaging platform.

The software shows the anatomy color coded so structures are easier to identify and to aid navigation. In this example, a pancreatic tumor is highlighted in green, which is the target of this virtual simulation. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

 

Information Technology | February 28, 2019

Andrew Deutsch, M.D., MBA, chairman and CEO of Renaissance Imaging Medical Associates (RIMA), an affiliate of Radiology Partners, describes RIMA’s use of an artificial intelligence (AI) based worklist workflow to manage reads across 70 sites and load balance between 120 radiologists. He spoke in sessions on this topic at the 2019 Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society at (HIMSS) conference.  

Deutsch, a nationally respected expert in skeletal radiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in addition to his roles at RIMA, serves as medical director of the imaging departments at Northridge Hospital Medical Center and Valley Presbyterian Hospital.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find other news and video from HIMSS 2019. 

Cardiac Imaging | February 27, 2019

This is a virtual heart with the same electrophysiology characteristics as the real patient unveiled by Siemens at the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 annual meeting in February. This "digital twin" technology is in development and will be able to create virtual, digital organs from a patient’s medical imnaging and other physiological data. In this case, the model was created using an ECG, MRI scan and other clinical data. It was shown as a way to help optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) lead placement. CRT currently has a 30 percent nonresponder rate, which is mainly due to the placement of leads. This model allows virtual placement of the leads In various locations to test response prior to the implantation procedure. The green dot shows the location of the virtual lead. Siemens said the technology also might have applications for testing virtual ablations strategies to save procedure time when the patient is in the EP lab

Read more about the digital twin technology.

Look through a photo gallery of other new technologies at HIMSS19. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

Radiation Therapy | February 15, 2019

ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the cutting-edge radiotherapy treatments and research being done at the Warrenville, Ill. center.

Watch the VIDEO: Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors, part 2 of the interview with Gondi.

Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine