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VIDEO: One on One with Amy K. Patel, MD, American Association for Women in Radiology Immediate Past President

Breast Imaging | April 11, 2024

Don't miss ITN's latest "One on One" video interview with AAWR Past President and American College of Radiology (ACR) RAN and RADPAC Chair, Amy K. Patel, MD, discussing advocacy initiatives and innovations in artificial intelligence (AI) for breast imaging. 

Dr. Patel is a breast imaging trailblazer and radiology advocacy leader. In this video,  learn how radiologists can support key initiatives, ways AI is improving patient care, and more.

Related content:

Leaders from RadEqual and the AAWR Sign MOU, Solidifying Commitment to Advance Opportunities in Radiology

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

VIDEO: Integrating Artificial Intelligence Into Radiologists Workflow

Radiology Imaging

Breast Imaging | April 11, 2024

Don't miss ITN's latest "One on One" video interview with AAWR Past President and American College of Radiology (ACR) RAN and RADPAC Chair, Amy K. Patel, MD, discussing advocacy initiatives and innovations in artificial intelligence (AI) for breast imaging. 

Dr. Patel is a breast imaging trailblazer and radiology advocacy leader. In this video,  learn how radiologists can support key initiatives, ways AI is improving patient care, and more.

Related content:

Leaders from RadEqual and the AAWR Sign MOU, Solidifying Commitment to Advance Opportunities in Radiology

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

VIDEO: Integrating Artificial Intelligence Into Radiologists Workflow

Digital Radiography (DR) | February 12, 2024

Agfa Radiology Solutions is committed to enhancing clinical outcomes and operational efficiency, underscoring its innovative edge in the dynamically evolving healthcare landscape. 

AT RSNA23, ITN met with Karol Wesolowski, Global Commercial Excellence Leader, Agfa Radiology Solutions, and Jeroen Spruyt, Head of BU DR, VP Product Supply and Operations, Agfa Radiology Solutions, to learn more about how the company is transforming radiology practices.

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

Related content:

VIDEO: Talking Trends with Agfa ‚ÄĒ What‚Äôs On Tap for RSNA 2023

RSNA | February 07, 2024

At RSNA23, Imaging Technology News (ITN) spoke with Bhvita Jani, principal analyst at Signify Research, about advancements and trends in medical imaging, including the development of coronary CTA, use of molecular imaging in theranostic applications, and remote acquisition support, as well as future outlooks and the evolution of medical imaging.

Related content:

VIDEO: Data Workflow and Orchestration in Medical Imaging

VIDEO: One on One with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD, RSNA President

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

View the RSNA23 Photo Gallery here

One on One ... with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD

RSNA | January 22, 2024

Updates on AI in Radiology, RSNA Programs and Stanford Initiatives 

Listen and learn with ITN‚Äôs newest ‚ÄúOne on One‚ÄĚ video discussion with a leader in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). RSNA President Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD, Stanford University, offers not-to-be-missed actionable insights into the application and benefits of artificial intelligence in medical imaging. He also shares highlights from RSNA 2023 and top priorities in the coming year, and summarizes the programs on which he and his Stanford University colleagues are focused.

Related content:

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

View the RSNA23 Photo Gallery here

One on One ... with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD

Digital Radiography (DR) | November 15, 2023

Agfa Radiology Solutions delivers diagnostic imaging solutions that set the standard in productivity, safety, clinical value and cost effectiveness ‚Äď Agfa firmly believe one image is all it takes.¬†

ITN recently visited with Agfa’s Greg Cefalo to learn more about what the company has on tap for RSNA 2023 in Chicago. 

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

Proton Therapy | October 10, 2023

Tune in to ITN‚Äôs latest ‚ÄúOne on One‚ÄĚ video series with Michael Butkus, PhD, for insights into proton therapy advancements. Butkus is the co-medical director and head of proton physics at the Dwoskin Proton Center at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami/UHealth Medical System. A board member of the National Association of Proton Therapy (NAPT), Butkus spoke with ITN‚Äôs managing editor to discuss how physicists, physicians and vendors are collaborating to expand availability of proton therapy and improve the health of patients being treated.¬†

Related proton therapy content:

Targeting Cancer, Tracking Collaboration: A Progress Report on Proton Therapy

ASTRO23 conference coverage

VIDEO: First FLASH Proton Therapy Trial Completed in Humans

 

Radiology Imaging | August 14, 2023

This summer, the Philips Radiology Experience Tour has been bringing Philips imaging modalities directly to the professionals that use them.

This tour offers physicians, technologists and administrators a unique opportunity to see equipment demonstrations and virtual simulations up close and in person!

Imaging Technology News spoke with Flavia Parisi and Tammie Rupnik to learn more about the Philips Radiology Experience Tour and how Philips continues to drive innovation.

If you weren't able to make it to any of the 2023 tour stops, stay tuned because the Tour will return in 2024! 

 

Related Content:

Take a Test Drive on the Philips Radiology Experience Tour

Redefining Radiology

BLOG: Artificial Intelligence Provides Radiologists with Solutions for Today … and Tomorrow

VIDEO: Talking Trends with Philips: Connecting Data and Technology

Philips Advances AI-powered Diagnostic Systems and Transformative Workflow Solutions at RSNA 2022

What Lies Ahead in 2023

Artificial Intelligence | June 12, 2023

Bayer Calantic and Blackford Analysis have teamed up with new artificial intelligence (AI) innovations to address the radiology challenges of today and tomorrow.

Imaging Technology News recently spoke with Thanos Karras, Head of Bayer Digital Solutions Business Americas, and Ben Panter, Founder and CEO of Blackford Analysis, to learn more about this new relationship and their strategy to drive radiology advancements with artificial intelligence.

Related Bayer Artificial Intelligence Content:

Bayer Offers The Complete Guide to Artificial Intelligence in Radiology, a Free eBook

Bayer Announces Acquisition of Blackford Analysis to Advance AI in Radiology Imaging

Talking Trends with Bayer: Transforming Radiology with Digital Solutions

Breast Imaging | May 08, 2023

In addition to women with dense breasts, there are also other women for whom mammographic screening is not really enough, which is why research needs to continue in this field. Dr. Wendie Berg, a leading breast cancer specialist, talks with ITN about new research and advancements in breast imaging technology.

Dr. Berg, MD, PhD, FACR, FSBI, is Professor of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, specializing in breast imaging. She is also the Chief Scientific Advisor to DenseBreast-info.org. A renowned expert, she writes and co-edits one of the leading textbooks on the topic, Diagnostic Imaging: Breast, currently in its third edition, and has co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed research publications.

Related Breast Density Content:

VIDEO: FDA Update on the US National Density Reporting Standard - A Discussion on the Final Rule

One on One … with Wendie Berg, MD, PhD, FACR, FSBI

Task Force Issues New Draft Recommendation Statement on Screening for Breast Cancer

Creating Patient Equity: A Breast Density Legislative Update

FDA Needs to Ensure that Information on Dense Breast Notifications are Clear and Understandable to all Members of the Public

AI Provides Accurate Breast Density Classification

VIDEO: The Impact of Breast Density Technology and Legislation

VIDEO: Personalized Breast Screening and Breast Density

VIDEO: Breast Cancer Awareness - Highlights of the NCoBC 2016 Conference

Fake News: Having Dense Breast Tissue is No Big Deal

The Manic World of Social Media and Breast Cancer: Gratitude and Grief

Related Breast Imaging Content:

Single vs. Multiple Architectural Distortion on Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

Today's Mammography Advancements 

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Spot Compression Clarifies Ambiguous Findings 

AI DBT Impact on Mammography Post-breast Therapy 

ImageCare Centers Unveils PINK Better Mammo Service Featuring Profound AI 

Radiologist Fatigue, Experience Affect Breast Imaging Call Backs 

Fewer Breast Cancer Cases Between Screening Rounds with 3-D Mammography

Study Finds Racial Disparities in Access to New Mammography Technology

American College of Radiology (ACR) Launches Contrast-Enhanced Mammography Imaging Screening Trial (CMIST) in Collaboration With GE Healthcare and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Breast Density | April 14, 2023

It has long been said that a national reporting standard is needed in order to ensure all American women receive at least the same basic information regarding breast density, and a spotlight put on the importance of routine breast imaging. Dr. Wendie Berg, a leading breast cancer specialist, shares with ITN what is being done in the fight against breast cancer and the importance of this standardization in reporting for women.

Dr. Berg, MD, PhD, FACR, FSBI, is Professor of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, specializing in breast imaging. She is also the Chief Scientific Advisor to DenseBreast-info.org. A renowned expert, she writes and co-edits one of the leading textbooks on the topic, Diagnostic Imaging: Breast, currently in its third edition, and has co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed research publications.

 

Related Breast Density Content:

VIDEO: Research and Advancements in Breast Imaging Technology

One on One … with Wendie Berg, MD, PhD, FACR, FSBI

Task Force Issues New Draft Recommendation Statement on Screening for Breast Cancer

Creating Patient Equity: A Breast Density Legislative Update

FDA Needs to Ensure that Information on Dense Breast Notifications are Clear and Understandable to all Members of the Public

AI Provides Accurate Breast Density Classification

VIDEO: The Impact of Breast Density Technology and Legislation

VIDEO: Personalized Breast Screening and Breast Density

VIDEO: Breast Cancer Awareness - Highlights of the NCoBC 2016 Conference

Fake News: Having Dense Breast Tissue is No Big Deal

The Manic World of Social Media and Breast Cancer: Gratitude and Grief

Related Breast Imaging Content:

Single vs. Multiple Architectural Distortion on Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

Today's Mammography Advancements 

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Spot Compression Clarifies Ambiguous Findings 

AI DBT Impact on Mammography Post-breast Therapy 

ImageCare Centers Unveils PINK Better Mammo Service Featuring Profound AI 

Radiologist Fatigue, Experience Affect Breast Imaging Call Backs 

Fewer Breast Cancer Cases Between Screening Rounds with 3-D Mammography

Study Finds Racial Disparities in Access to New Mammography Technology

American College of Radiology (ACR) Launches Contrast-Enhanced Mammography Imaging Screening Trial (CMIST) in Collaboration With GE Healthcare and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Enterprise Imaging | March 13, 2023

Philips Radiology Operations Command Center (ROCC) is a vendor-neutral, multi-modality, multi-site telepresence tool that provides advanced tele-acquisition capabilities and connects imaging experts at a Command Center with technologists at scanning locations across an organization.  

Imaging Technology News recently met with Tanuj Gupta, Business Category Leader, Operational Informatics, and Omkar Phanse, Market Leader, Radiology Workflow Solutions, to learn more about this powerful tele-presence tool. 

Find more RSNA22 coverage here

Philips Advances AI-powered Diagnostic Systems and Transformative Workflow Solutions at RSNA 2022

What Lies Ahead in 2023

Contrast Media | February 27, 2023

Bracco Diagnostics and Guerbet recently announced they had formed a strategic, global collaboration for the research, development, and manufacture of a new contrast agent.

Imaging Technology News talked to Jeff Fleming, president and CEO, at RSNA 2022 to learn more about this relationship and find out what Bracco is doing for the future of radiology.

For more information: www.vueway.com

Find more RSNA22 coverage here

Related content:

Bracco and Guerbet Partner to Expand Access to Novel Imaging Agent

First Nationwide Use of Bracco's VUEWAY (gadopiclenol) Solution for Injection for MRI

Guerbet Announces Commercial Launch and First Patient Dosing of Elucirem (Gadopiclenol) Injection

Digital Radiography (DR) | February 23, 2023

Agfa continues develop new products and technologies in its premium and value direct radiography segments including the Valory digital radiography room and the DR 100S.

Imaging Technology News stopped by the Agfa booth at RSNA 2022 to learn more about these products as well as the company’s technology roadmap for the future.

Find more RSNA22 coverage here 

 

Lung Imaging | January 03, 2023

Kim Sandler, MD, Co-Chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Lung Cancer Screening Steering Committee, and Associate Professor, Department of Radiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, recently shared updates on research and initiatives for expanding life-saving lung cancer screenings. This video is part of ITN's Special Report on Lung Cancer Screening, a 3-part series focused on news and resources addressing the leading cause of U.S. cancer deaths.

Related Lung Imaging Content:  

Special Report on Lung Cancer and Screening Initiatives

Special Report on Lung Cancer and Screening Initiatives, Part II

American Lung Association Addresses Awareness on World Lung Cancer Day 

MRI Sheds Light on COVID Vaccine-Associated Heart Muscle Injury  

What We Know About Cardiac Long-COVID Two Years Into the Pandemic   

VIDEO: Long-term Cardiac Impacts of COVID-19 Two Years Into The Pandemic¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Aaron Baggish, M.D.¬†¬†

VIDEO: Long-COVID Presentations in Cardiology at Beaumont Hospital¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with¬†Justin Trivax, M.D.¬†¬†

VIDEO: Cardiac Presentations in COVID Long-haulers at Cedars-Sinai Hospital¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Siddharth Singh, M.D.¬†¬†

Find more COVID news and videos  

PHOTO GALLERY: How COVID-19 Appears on Medical Imaging  

VIDEO: How to Image COVID-19 and Radiological Presentations of the Virus¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Margarita Revzin, M.D.¬†¬†

American Lung Association Addresses Awareness on World Lung Cancer Day 

Find more radiology related COVID news and videos  

 

Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) | May 13, 2022

Arun Nagdev, M.D., director of emergency ultrasound at the Alameda Health System, clinical associate professor, University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine, and incoming president for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) ultrasound section, explains the rise in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nagdev has used cart-based and several hand-held systems to the emergency department to triage patients, help sort out COVID and non-COVID patients and identify patients that need more detailed radiology imaging or with issues that need immediate attention, such as pulmonary embolism, heart attacks and aortic aneurisms. 

Nagdev also serves as senior director of clinical education for start-up POCUS company Exo, which is developing a new chip-based, handheld ultrasound system with a high definition transducer.

Watch the related¬†VIDEO: How to Image COVID-19 and Radiological Presentations of the Virus¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Margarita Revzin, M.D.

More COVID-19 content can be found here

Computed Tomography (CT) | March 09, 2022

At RSNA 2021, Philips highlighted the launch of two new innovative CT systems ‚Äď the multi-energy Spectral CT 7500 and the CT 5100 Incisive with embedded AI capabilities.¬†ITN¬†spoke with Wendy Winkle Lawless, CT Business Market Leader - North America, Philips, to learn more about these new systems.

Digital Radiography (DR) | March 01, 2022

At RSNA 2021, Konica Minolta introduced the mKDR Xpress Mobile X-ray system and the Aero DR Carbon flat panel detector. Also on display was nVoq’s cloud-based speech recognition and automation solution and new features for the Exa platform that automate common clinical and administrative tasks.

You can find more RSNA21 content here

Contrast Media | February 23, 2022

With the use of contrast agents and radiotracers on the rise, GE Healthcare has seen increases in demand across their pharmaceutical diagnostics business. At RSNA 2021, Marco Campione, General Manager, Pharmaceutical Diagnostics Americas, GE Healthcare, shared how recent investments are helping to meet this increased demand.

Find more RSNA21 content here

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 09, 2022

At RSNA 2021, Fujifilm launched its new Velocity MRI system. It is designed to streamline workflow and enhance the patient experience with its open gantry, integrated RF coils and reconstruction techniques. Shawn Etheridge, Director, CT and MRI Marketing for Fujifilm, unveiled the system on the RSNA21 show floor.

Fujifilm Launches the Velocity MRI System at RSNA 2021

Additional RSNA21 content

Quality Assurance (QA) | January 31, 2022

Sun Nuclear highlighted two resources for CT Quality Assurance at RSNA 2021. ITN visited their booth to learn more about the Mercury 4.0 Phantom and the Multi-Energy CT Phantom from Thomas Webb, Global Product Marketing Manager

Find more RSNA news and videos

Digital Radiography (DR) | January 31, 2022

Agfa recently announced the launch of the new Valory digital radiography room, which was designed for health care facilities requiring a highly productive radiography solution. 

ITN stopped by the Agfa booth at RSNA 2021 to learn more about this new system from Georges Espada, Head of Digital Radiography, and Karol Wesolowski, Global Category Leader.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | January 31, 2022

Marc Succi, M.D., an emergency radiologist at MGH and executive director of the MESH Incubator, an in-house innovation and entrepreneurship center, and  Ottavia Zattra, a fourth-year medical student at Harvard Medical School, explain a study they authored showing there might be higher cancer rates due to lower numbers of CT scans during COVID-19. They presented this study as a late-breaker at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

COVID caused many people to delay seeing their doctors. Their study found a corresponding 82% drop in CT imaging for cancer screening. CT is also used for initial cancer workups, to monitor active cancer and post procedure surveillance, which all also showed decline since the start of the pandemic.

Read more about the study COVID-19 Fallout May Lead to More Cancer Deaths

Computed Tomography (CT) | January 28, 2022

Charlie Hamm, M.D., a radiology resident at the Charité University Hospital of Berlin, Germany, presented a late-breaking study at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting on the use of computed tomography (CT) scans to investigate dinosaur bones non-destructively. In the process of examining a tyrannosaurus rex jaw bone that is more than 66 million years old, a bone tumor was found and clearly shown on the CT scans.

This feasibility study to determine if CT can be used to aid paleontology was done in collaboration with the Museum f√ľr Naturkunde Berlin. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) was used to provide information about tissue composition and disease processes not possible with single-energy CT.

Read more in the article CT Uncovers Bone Disease in Tyrannosaurus Rex Jaw

Find more RSNA news and video

 

 

Quality Assurance (QA) | January 28, 2022

Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief physicist, Johns Hopkins Hospital, and professor of radiology and radiological science, explains the basics involved in quality assurance (QA) of radiology imaging systems. He spoke to ITN at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

He explains the role of the medical physicist in keeping X-ray imaging systems such as CT, angiography and mammography calibrated and checking the device output of radiation. This is performed by imaging phantoms that mimic a simplified representation of the human body. 

Artificial intelligence (AI) use is growing in imaging and medical physics and QA of these systems might also become a duty of the medical physicist in some AI imaging applications.  

Find more content on QA systems

Find more RSNA news and video

Computed Tomography (CT) | January 27, 2022

Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic's CT Clinical Innovation Center,  explains how photon-counting computed tomography (CT) detectors work and why it is a better technology over conventional CT systems. She helped Siemens develop the Naeotom Alpha, the first photo-counting CT system to be approved by the FDA in the fall of 2021. She spoke to ITN at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

Read more about the first commercial photon-counting scanner 

The device uses the emerging CT technology of photon-counting detectors, which can measure each individual X-ray photon that passes through a patient's body, as opposed to current systems which use detectors that measure the total energy contained in many X-rays at once. By "counting" each individual X-ray photon, more detailed information about the patient can be obtained and used to create images with less information that is not useful, such as image noise. 

Current CT technology uses a two-step conversion process to convert X-ray photons into visible light using a scintillator layer in the detector. Then, photo diode light sensors turn the visible light into a digital signal. Due to this intermediate step, important information about the energy of the X-rays is lost and no longer available to aid in diagnosis. Also, contrast is reduced and images are not as clear.

Photon-counting detectors use a single step of direct conversion of X-rays into electrical current, and skips the step of converting X-rays into visible light. This allows the energy thresholds of each pulse to be collected and binned based on different kilovolt (kV) energy levels. This creates data to improve contrast and enable dual-energy, spectral imaging. The direct conversion also helps improve image quality without information loss. This improves image sharpness and contrast.

Photon-counting detectors have already been used for several years in high-energy physics and nuclear imaging. However, these previously generation photon-counting detectors could not be used with a clinical CT scanner because they could not keep up with the high higher rate of photons reaching the detector. The detector on the Naeotom Alpha was designed for this increased speed.

Related Photon-counting CT Content:

Mayo Clinic Begins Use of Third-Generation Photon-counting CT Clinical Research Detector

VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D.

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Todd Villines, M.D.

Key Trends in Cardiac CT at SCCT 2020

GE Healthcare Pioneers Photon Counting CT with Prismatic Sensors Acquisition

Top Trend Takeaways in Radiology From RSNA 2020

NeuroLogica Joins Forces with Massachusetts General Hospital to Pilot Photon Counting CT at the Patient’s Point-Of-Care Using OmniTom Elite CT

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.

Computed Tomography (CT) | January 27, 2022

Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic's Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, explains how CT dose tracking software works and offers advice to centers that record this patient level and device information. She spoke to ITN at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

Dose tracking software allows hospitals and imaging centers to track what levels of radiation they are using by exam type protocol. It can show technologists who are using higher than required doses that may need additional ALARA training. The radiation dose tracking systems also can help track the amount of radiation a patient has received over time.

Related Radiation Dose Tracking Systems:

Disputed EHR Dose Levels Could Keep Patients From Necessary Imaging Exams

Medical Imaging Radiation Exposure in U.S. Dropped Over Past Decade

VIDEO: Radiation From Medical Imaging in U.S. Dropped Over Past Decade

The Basics of Radiation Dose Monitoring in Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Radiation Dose Monitoring in Medical Imaging ‚ÄĒ Interview with Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D.
 

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 24, 2022

With the recent launch of the Magnifico Open, Italian company Esaote has entered the open MRI whole body space. ITN had a conversation with Franco Fontana, CEO of Esaote, at RSNA21.

Magnifico Open, which adds to the range of Esaote products unveiled in 2021, is an open magnetic resonance system with the latest technology. The wide choice of receiver coils and state-of-the-art MRI technology offer the user excellent image quality, while the permanent magnet makes it easy to use and lowers operating costs. The open magnet and the easy-to-access patient table also facilitate, speed up and make patient positioning more comfortable, ideal for both the claustrophobic and for children.

View more RSNA21 content here

Esaote North America Receives FDA Approval of the Magnifico Open MRI System

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 18, 2022

Orlando Simonetti, Ph.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine, worked with Siemens to help develop a new, lower-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, the Magnetom Free.Max. It can scan patients that previously may have been contraindicated because of implantable medical devices. One of the first systems installed in the U.S. is at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. It has a much lower magnetic field and a larger patient opening, removing barriers to MRI imaging for many patients.

Simonetti and his colleagues developed new techniques to boost the signal-to-noise ratio in MRI machines, which allowed the creation of a machine with a lower magnetic field strength that still enables high quality images.

The system gained FDA clearance in July 2021 and was featured by Siemens at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The interview and footage was provided by The Ohio University State University Wexner Medical Center.

Read more in the articles New FDA-approved MRI Expands Access to Life-saving Imaging and Ohio State Researchers Help Design New MRI, Expanding Access to Life-saving Imaging.

Related MRI Content:

Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Installation of Magnetom Free.Max 80 cm MR Scanner

FDA Clears Siemens Healthineers Magnetom Free.Max 80 cm MR Scanner

Ohio State Researchers Help Design New MRI, Expanding Access to Life-saving Imaging

 

Enterprise Imaging | January 13, 2022

Steve Holloway, company director at Signify Research, explains the trends he has seen over the past couple years in enterprise imaging. He spoke to ITN at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America meeting.

Holloway shared how medical imaging systems are expanding to include all departments in healthcare system enterprises that generate data, images and waveforms, so these items can be stored in a central location, rather than disparate silos or in separate systems requiring multiple logins or specific workstations. Most of these systems are are web enabled or web based, allowing users to work from anywhere as long as they have an internet connection. Most enterprise imaging systems also use a web-based vendor neutral archive, allowing DICOM and non-DICOM images to be stored there. All of these features allow easier and faster access to patient information and images.

He said these systems are becoming more inclusive of ologies outside of radiology and cardiology. Most notably is digital pathology, which was featured by many enterprise imaging vendors at RSNA 2021. 

Enterprise imaging systems are also accepting point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS), which has exploded in use over the past two years with COVID, Holloway said.

Find more RSNA news and video

VIDEO: Trends in Radiology IT seen at RSNA 2021 ‚ÄĒ Interview with Jef Williams, Paragon Consultants

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Trends in Medical Imaging¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D, from Signify Research

VIDEO: Examples of Improved PACS Workflow to Aid Speed and Efficiency 

VIDEO: The New Normal of Home Workstations, Teleradiology and Remote Reading¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Elizabeth Hawk, M.D.

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2019
 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 14, 2021

Jean Jeudy, M.D., professor of radiology and vice chair of informatics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, presented a late-breaking study at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting on COVID-19 linked myocarditis in college athletes. 

A small but significant percentage of college athletes with COVID-19 develop myocarditis, a potentially dangerous inflammation of the heart muscle, that can only be seen on cardiac MRI, according to the study Jeudy presented. Myocarditis, which typically occurs as a result of a bacterial or viral infection, can affect the heart’s rhythm and ability to pump and often leaves behind lasting damage in the form of scarring to the heart muscle. It has been linked to as many as 20% of sudden deaths in young athletes. The COVID-19 pandemic raised concerns over an increased incidence of the condition in student-athletes.

For the new study, clinicians at schools in the highly competitive Big Ten athletic conference collaborated to collect data on the frequency of myocarditis in student-athletes recovering from COVID-19 infection. Conference officials had required all athletes who had COVID-19 to get a series of cardiac tests before returning to play, providing a unique opportunity for researchers to collect data on the athletes’ cardiac status.

Thirty-seven of the athletes, or 2.3%, were diagnosed with COVID-19 myocarditis, a percentage on par with the incidence of myocarditis in the general population. However, an alarmingly high proportion of the myocarditis cases were found in athletes with no clinical symptoms. Twenty of the patients with COVID-19 myocarditis (54%) had neither cardiac symptoms nor cardiac testing abnormalities. Only cardiac MRI identified the problem.

Read more details in the article COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes.

Find more RSNA news and video

Related COVID-19 Imaging and Myocarditis Content:

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes¬†‚ÄĒ RSNA 2021 late-breaker

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications ‚ÄĒ Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

Breast Imaging | December 13, 2021

Stamatia Destounis, M.D., FACR, chief of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Commission, managing partner, Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, Rochester, N.Y., explains some of the key trends in breast imaging at the 2021  Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

She discusses the trends of 3D mammography seeing rapid growth, adoption of synthetic 2D breast images from the tomosynthesis datasets, contrast-enhanced mammography, and breast MRI to help women with dense breast tissue. Destounis also discusses the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to help radiologists with finding what they needs with larger datasets in 3D mammography, and to help act as a second set of eyes.

Early in 2021, with the roll out of the COVID vaccines, one of the biggest headlines in radiology was that the vaccine can show false positives for cancer because it may cause inflammation of lymph nodes. Destounis explains this issue and how women's health centers have largely overcome this by asking patients about their vaccination status and planning imaging around the vaccination dates.

Related Breast Imaging Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Can Cause False Positive Cancer Diagnosis

Help Spread Awareness of Potential COVID-19 Vaccine Imaging Side-effects

VIDEO: COVID Vaccine May Cause Enlarged Lymph Nodes on Mammograms¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Constance "Connie" Lehman, M.D.

COVID-19 Vaccination Axillary Adenopathy Detected During Breast Imaging

VIDEO: COVID Vaccine Adenopathy Can Last Up to 10 Weeks ‚ÄĒ Interview with Yael Eshet, M.D.

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Trends in Medical Imaging ‚ÄĒ Interview with Signify Research

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

Find more RSNA news and video

Artificial Intelligence | December 08, 2021

Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D., Signify Research senior market analyst, explains some of the recent trends in the application of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

He discusses three trends in AI at RSNA, including:
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ AI-based critical care team tools for rapid communication and assessment of patient imaging. This is activated by an AI first pass review of the images. This includes response team alerts for pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, aortic dissection and acute heart failure.
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ AI systems now offering numerous algorithms¬†to perform multiple tasks, rather than a single¬†function, adding greater valve for those AI apps.
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ Greater integration of AI apps into PACS so it fits into the radiology workflow.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 06, 2021

Kate Hanneman, M.D., MPH, FRCPC, director of cardiac imaging research JDMI, and the medical imaging site director at Toronto General Hospital, Women’s College Hospital, was an author on a recent overview of cardiac MRI assessments of non-ischemic myocardial inflammation caused by the COVID-19 vaccine. She presented this study and other related data at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

The rare side effect from the COVID vaccine is seen mainly in young men between ages 12-29. It appears to resolve on its own after a couple days, but longer term monitoring is needed to show if there is any lasting cardiac damage. A small number of single cases with follow up MRI imaging so far have not shown long term damage. 

Hanneman noted the incidence of vaccine-related myocarditis is very rare and people have a much high probability of getting much more serious COVID-viral myocarditis is they are not vaccinated. She said so the risk-vs-benefit analysis currently shows it is better to get vaccinated to prevent or lessen the effects of COVID. 

Related COVID-19 Imaging Content:

VIDEO: COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes ‚ÄĒ Interview with Jean Jeudy, M.D.

Overview of Myocarditis Cases Caused by the COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Linked to Heart Inflammation in College Athletes ‚ÄĒ RSNA 2021 late-breaker

Cardiac MRI of Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents

Large International Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications - RSNA 2021 late-breaker

COVID-19 During Pregnancy Doesn’t Harm Baby’s Brain

VIDEO: Large Radiology Study Reveals Spectrum of COVID-19 Brain Complications ‚ÄĒ Interview with Scott Faro, M.D.

FDA Adds Myocarditis Warning to COVID mRNA Vaccine Clinician Fact Sheets

Small Number of Patients Have Myocarditis-like Illness After COVID-19 Vaccination

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | December 03, 2021

Scott Faro, M.D., professor of radiology and neurology and director, division of neuroradiology, head and neck, at Thomas Jefferson University, is the lead author on a large late-breaking study at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting showing the neurological impact of COVID-19 on patients' brains. 

The 38,000-patient neurological imaging study showed about 10% of hospitalized COVID patients will have central nervous system (CNS) complications. These include cerebrovascular accident (CVA) such as ischemic strokes (62% of CNS cases reported), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH - in 37% of cases) , encephalitis (5%), sinus venous thrombosis (SVT - 2%), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM - 2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES - 2%), and vasculitis (0.5%).

Read more on this study 

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Radiation Therapy | November 15, 2021

Siemens and Philips demonstrated examples of new imaging software to convert MRI datasets into synthetic computed tomography (CT) datasets at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. The synthetic CT datasets can be used for radiotherapy treatment planning. This eliminates the need for a separate CT scan, reducing time and cost in patient care. 

The technology uses an algorithm to convert the MRI dataset into a CT grayscale Hounsfield units. The Hounsfield units correlate with the densities of the various tissues and are used to calculate the doses required and beam routes needed in radiotherapy to treat a patient.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 19, 2021

An example of popliteal artery thrombosis formation caused by COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2). Coronavirus often caused thrombus formation in the body, leading to numerous types of complications, including pulmonary embolism, stroke, heart attack, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and ischemia or infarcts in various organs.

Related COVID ultrasound video clips: 

VIDEO: COVID Lung Ultrasound B-lines and Pleural Thickening

VIDEO: COVID Pneumonia Lung Consolidation on Ultrasound

This video clip is part of the examples from an RSNA journal Radiographics article on the radiology presentations and complications of the COVID virus and which modalities can best image these features. Here are links to the two articles:

Manifestations of COVID-19, Part 1: Viral Pathogenesis and Pulmonary and Vascular System Complications. 

Multisystem Imaging Manifestations of COVID-19, Part 2: From Cardiac Complications to Pediatric Manifestations

The video is from the study lead-author Margarita Revzin, M.D., MS, FSRU, FAIUM, associate professor of radiology and biomedical imaging, Yale University School of Medicine, abdominal and emergency imaging, radiologist. She explains more details in the VIDEO: Overview COVID-19 Imaging Techniques Using X-ray, CT, MRI and Ultrasound.

 

Find more COVID medical imaging in the PHOTO GALLERY: How COVID-19 Appears on Medical Imaging. 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 31, 2021

Several radiology IT vendors at 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference demonstrated computed tomography (CT) imaging advanced visualization software software to help automatically identify and quantify COVID-19 pneumonia in the lungs. These tools can help speed assessment of the lung involvement and serial tracking can be used to assess the patient's progress in the hospital and during long-COVID observation. 

Examples of COVID analysis tool shown in this video include clips from booth tours at: 
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ Fujifilm
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ Siemens Healthineers¬†
¬† ¬†‚ÄĘ Canon (Vital)

Canon received FDA clearance for its tool under and emergency use authorization (EUA).

Siemens said its tool was part of its lung analysis originally developed for cancer but modified and prioritized to aid in COVID assessments. 
 

HIMSS Related Content:

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging¬†‚ÄĒ Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings ‚ÄĒ Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

 

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