Neuro Imaging

stress, brain activity, cardiovascular risk, PET-CT, MGH, ISSMS, The Lancet study
News | Neuro Imaging | January 18, 2017

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS)...

Siemens, Biogen, joint development, MRI tools, multiple sclerosis
News | Neuro Imaging | January 17, 2017

January 17, 2017 — Siemens Healthineers and Biogen have announced the companies plan to jointly develop...

magnetoencephalography, MEG, brain scans, concussion detection, Simon Fraser University, SFU study, PLOS Computational Biology
News | Neuro Imaging | January 03, 2017

Simon Fraser University researchers have found that high-resolution brain scans, coupled with computational analysis...

pregnancy brain, pregnant brain, pregnancy's effect on the brain

An image from the study showing brain volume changes in women post pregnancy. Image by Oscar Vilarroya.

 

 

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 28, 2016

December 28, 2016 — Pregnancy involves radical hormone surges and biological adaptations, but the effects on the...

MRI brain
Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 22, 2016

If you're thinking about taking up running as your New Year's resolution and still need some convincing, consider...

Videos | RSNA 2016 | December 19, 2016

ITN and DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new technologies being displayed on the...

Videos | Neuro Imaging | December 12, 2016

Max Wintermark, M.D., professor of radiology and chief of neuroradiology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, explains...

MRI

Comparing a PET scan of an NFL player’s brain, left, and an MRI of a former high school football player’s brain shows similar suspected CTE pathology in the midbrain. Image courtesy of UCLA Health

News | Neuro Imaging | December 12, 2016

UCLA doctors have found what may be an earlier and easier way to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE,...

astronauts, MRI study, visual impairment, RSNA 2016

Image courtesy of NASA

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 02, 2016

A visual problem affecting astronauts who serve on lengthy missions in space is related to volume changes in the...

Boston Children's Hospital, GE Healthcare, pediatric brain disorders, decision support platform
News | Pediatric Imaging | November 29, 2016

Boston Children's Hospital and GE Healthcare announced a collaboration to develop and commercialize digital...

Zika virus effects, radiology studies, CT, ultrasound, MRI, RSNA 2016
News | Neuro Imaging | November 22, 2016

Three new studies reporting on the effects of the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil will be presented at the 2016 annual...

neurological disorders, MRI
News | Neuro Imaging | November 22, 2016

Philips announced the introduction of a suite of magnetic resonance (MR)-based software applications dedicated to...

musical training, brain connections, children, diffustion tensor imaging, DTI, MRI, magnetic resonance imaging, RSNA 2016 study
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | November 21, 2016

Taking music lessons increases brain fiber connections in children and may be useful in treating autism and...

News | Clinical Study | November 21, 2016

Brain imaging scans may one day provide useful information on the response to psychotherapy in patients with...

MRI, brain scans, shrinkage, dementia with Lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease, Neurology journal study
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | November 02, 2016

Lack of shrinkage in the area of the brain responsible for memory may be a sign people with thinking and memory...

Alzheimer's disease, early diagnosis, PET scans, imaging compound, Fluselenamyl

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a chemical compound that detects the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta better than current FDA-approved agents. The compound potentially may be used in brain scans to identify people in the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease. In the image, the compound has passed from the bloodstream of a living mouse into its brain, where it is detected by a positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Arrows indicate clumps of amyloid beta. Credit Ping Yan and Jin-Moo Lee.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | November 02, 2016

November 2, 2016 — By the time unambiguous signs of memory loss and cognitive decline appear in people with...

Tourette's, MRI brain scans, children, Washington University of St. Louis School of Medicine

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified areas in the brains of children with Tourette's syndrome that appear markedly different from the same areas in brains of children who don't have the disorder. Above, in a scan of a child with Tourette's, yellow indicates an area with less white matter than in the same brain region in kids who don't have the disorder. The scans also revealed areas in the brains of kids with Tourette's that have more gray matter than in children without the condition. Credit: Washington University School of Medicine

News | Neuro Imaging | November 01, 2016

Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have...

children, PTSD, brain disruption, MRI, Chinese study, Radiology journal
News | Neuro Imaging | October 31, 2016

Children with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience disruptions in the structure of the neural networks...

youth football players, brain changes, no concussion, MRI study, Wake Forest, Christopher Whitlow, Radiology journal

MR images of left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (top) before and (middle) after the playing season, and (bottom) the overlay. In the overlay (bottom), the red region is after the season and the blue region is before the season. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America.

News | Neuro Imaging | October 28, 2016

Researchers have found measurable brain changes in children after a single season of playing youth football, even...

Case Western Reserve University study, machine learning, MRI, brain cancer diagnoses, radiomics

MRI scans of patients with radiation necrosis (above) and cancer recurrence (below) are shown in the left column. Close-ups in the center column show the regions are indistinguishable on routine scans. Radiomic descriptors unearth subtle differences showing radiation necrosis, in the upper right panel, has less heterogeneity, shown in blue, compared to cancer recurrence, in the lower right, which has a much higher degree of heterogeneity, shown in red. Credit: Pallavi Tiwari

News | Analytics Software | October 25, 2016

Computer programs have defeated humans in Jeopardy!, chess and Go. Now a program developed at Case Western Reserve...

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