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VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 19, 2020

Stephen Bloom, M.D., FASNC, director of noninvasive cardiology (cardiac CT, nuclear cardiology and echocardiography) at Midwest Heart and Vascular Associates, Overland Park, Kansas. He is also a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, explains some of the issues involved and protocols used for cardiac imaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. His discussion includes computed tomography, cardiac ultrasound and nuclear imaging.

Right now, Bloom said it is difficult to test everybody and there is a shortage of masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment (PPE), and the imaging equipment needs to be sanitized each time it is used. He said it is just is not possible to image all the patients who need imaging right now. Hospitals also are trying to limit the number of healthy people people coming into hospitals for routine visits and tests to reduce their potential exposure to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) and help containment efforts. 

"The tests should be done, very simply, if it changes the care of the patient. If it doesn't change the care of the patient, and it can be postponed, it should be postponed," Bloom explained. "I would say 80 percent of our cardiac imaging exams have stopped. It has been very dramatic."

 

Related Imaging Precautions During COVID-19 Content:

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VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D. 

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.  

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

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VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

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Molecular Imaging

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 18, 2020

Stephen Bloom, M.D., FASNC, director of noninvasive cardiology (cardiac CT, nuclear cardiology and echocardiography) at Midwest Heart and Vascular Associates, Overland Park, Kansas. He is also a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, explains some of the issues involved and protocols used for cardiac imaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. His discussion includes computed tomography, cardiac ultrasound and nuclear imaging.

Right now, Bloom said it is difficult to test everybody and there is a shortage of masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment (PPE), and the imaging equipment needs to be sanitized each time it is used. He said it is just is not possible to image all the patients who need imaging right now. Hospitals also are trying to limit the number of healthy people people coming into hospitals for routine visits and tests to reduce their potential exposure to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) and help containment efforts. 

"The tests should be done, very simply, if it changes the care of the patient. If it doesn't change the care of the patient, and it can be postponed, it should be postponed," Bloom explained. "I would say 80 percent of our cardiac imaging exams have stopped. It has been very dramatic."

 

Related Imaging Precautions During COVID-19 Content:

Cardiac Imaging Best Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic

ASE Guidelines for the Protection of Echocardiography Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak 

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D. 

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.  

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with radiologist John Kim, M.D.

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 04, 2020

Hicham Skali, M.D., a staff cardiologist and member of the Non-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and at Brigham and Women’s / Massachusetts General Health Care Center at Foxborough, explains the new recommendations from the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) and from imagers in China and Singapore. The ASNC created a best practices document for nuclear cardiology laboratories during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. The suggestions in the guidelines can ally to any imaging modality, including computed tomography (CT), MRI and ultrasound. 

Skali elaborates on the following points in his discussion, which are specific recommendations in the ASNC and SNMMI COVID-19 guidance document:
   • Rescheduling non-urgent visits
   • Rescheduling elective surgeries and procedures
   • Using separate spaces for patients with known or suspected COVID-19 to prevent spread
   • Ensuring supplies are available
   • Promoting use of telehealth
   • Screen staff, patients and visitors before they enter the department
   • Minimize non-essential visitors into the department
   • Record symptoms at the start of the shift
   • Use personal protective equipment (PPE)for healthcare personnel
   • If available, use PPE for patients due to concern of asymptomatic transmission of COVID-19
   • Maintain strict hand hygiene
   • Maintain 6 feet distance in all patient/staff interactions when possible
   • Work remotely whenever feasible, especially with ready studies
   • Rotating staff schedules for on-site and off-site work
   • Use of rest only studies if possible
   • Use of half-time SPECT to speed exam times
   • Use of PET if available to speed exam times

Skali served as the moderator in for the ASNC on demand webinar COVID-19 Preparedness for Nuclear Cardiology Labs: Insights from the US, China and Singapore.

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D., an ASNC Board member and also a speaker during the ASNC webinar.

Find more news and video on relating to COVID-19 and its impact on radiology

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 27, 2020

Regina Druz, M.D., FASNC, a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, chairwomen of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Healthcare Innovation Section, and a cardiologist at Integrative Cardiology Center of Long Island, N.Y., explains the rapid expansion of telemedicine with the U.S. spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2).

Druz spoke on the unprecedented expansion of telemedicine in the U.S. under COVID-19, seeing more use in the last two months, as opposed to the past two decades. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) previously only reimbursed for Telehealth in rural areas it determined had a shortage of doctors. However, in early March 2020, CMS dropped the geographic requirements and allowed Telehealth usage across th country as a way to mitigate person-to-person contact and keep vulnerable, older patients at home for routine check ups with doctors.

Druz has subspecialty certifications in nuclear cardiology, adult echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography (CT) and explains how Telehealth can be used to pre-screen patients and get patient sign off on procedures prior to coming in for an exam, helping speed the process in the hospital and limit personal contact.

Concerns about the rpaid spread of COVID-19 also has driven many radiology departments to convert to wider use of teleradiology to allow more radiologists to work from home and reduce person-to-person contact within the hospitals. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with John Kim, M.D., chairman, Department of Radiology, THR Presbyterian Plano, Texas, and chief technology officer at Texas Radiology Associates.

 

Related COVID-19 Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 

 

 

Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019

Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting

 

Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

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SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018

This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It's CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.

Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” 

Read the article "Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition."

Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018

Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.

Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital

 

Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:

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Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017

Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article "Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging."

 

Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017

Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO "PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology." Read the related articles "Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,"  and "Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging."

Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017

Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article "CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders."

Radiology Business | May 03, 2017

Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging. 
 

Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017

David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty.

Radiation Oncology | July 28, 2015

American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) President John Boone, Ph.D., discusses the impact of imaging in medical physics, as well as key topics addressed at this year’s meeting, with Imaging Technology News Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane.

Proton Therapy | October 06, 2014

Introducing HYPERSCAN , Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery HYPERSCAN enables tumor volumes to be scanned in a matter of seconds, benefiting from the MEVION S250's direct and efficient beam generation. The result is a fast Pencil Beam Scanning enabling robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy treatment delivery that is much less sensitive to patient and tumor motions, ultimately increasing the efficacy of the treatment procedure. The MEVION S250 proton therapy platform with HYPERSCAN allows you to treat with precision, accuracy and reproducibility at unparalleled speed with uncompromised beam quality. Designed for greater access by any size cancer care facility, the MEVION S250 significantly reduces the complexity, size, and cost associated with conventional proton therapy systems. The MEVION S250 is specifically engineered as upgrade-ready to continue providing the most advanced proton therapy treatment available today as well as tomorrow. Key Features : Field-Upgradeable; Streamlined Clinical Workflow with Full OIS Integration; High-Accuracy Beam Pointing with Submillimeter Position Tracking; Fast Volumetric and Layer Rescanning Capabilities; Supports Standard Gating Interface for Beam On/Off Hold

Nuclear Imaging | June 20, 2014

DAIC Editor Dave Fornell shares his choices for the most innovative new technologies in nuclear imaging that were on display at the 2014 Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) annual meeting.

Nuclear Imaging | June 19, 2014

Satoshi Minoshima, M.D., Ph.D., chairman of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Scientific Committee, discusses the new technologies and trends at SNMMI 2014.

Radiology Imaging | December 13, 2013

ITN Editor Dave Fornell and contributing editor Greg Freiherr discuss some of the most interesting new developments on the show floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2013 annual meeting.

Radiology Imaging | December 03, 2013

Greg Freiherr speaks from the show floor on day three of the 2013 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Radiation Oncology | August 13, 2013

AAPM President John Hazle, Ph.D., discusses trends in medical physics and major initiatives that the association is addressing in 2014 with Imaging Technology News Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane.

Neuro Imaging | June 24, 2013

Peter Herscovitch, M.D., SNMMI president-elect, explains the advances in molecular imaging for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinsonian syndromes during the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2013 meeting in Vancouver, Canada. While new agents allow imaging of these disease states, reimbursement and treatment decisions sometimes limit their use.

Nuclear Imaging | June 24, 2013

Gary Dillehay, M.D., FACR, FACNM, SNMMI president, explains some of the trends in Nuclear Imaging at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2013 annual meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

Radiology Imaging | December 14, 2012

ITN Editor Dave Fornell highlights his choices for the most innovative radiology technologies and trends at Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), 2012. Choices include the first wireless ultrasound transducer, noiseless MRI, a 640-slice CT scanner and a printer than creates sculptures from 3-D datasets.

Find more current news and video from RSNA

 

Nuclear Imaging | July 26, 2012

Speaking with ITN Editorial Director Helen Kuhl at the SNM annual meeting in Miami Beach, Fla., in June, incoming president Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, explains the reasoning behind the society's name change from Society of Nuclear Medicine to Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He also shares highlights of the successful 2012 event.

Nuclear Imaging | July 26, 2012

Incoming president Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, describes the primary initiatives the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging will be undertaking during the coming year, during an interview with ITN Editorial Director Helen Kuhl at the society's annual meeting in June. These include growing global initiatives, including more involvement in developing countries, plus continued education and efforts with regard to radiation dose and dose optimization.

Nuclear Imaging | July 26, 2012

Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, incoming president of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, shares his views about significant trends in the field, including the emergence of new amyloid imaging agents and other new agents, radionuclide therapy and the ongoing focus on quality and safety.

SNMMI | June 27, 2011

Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) President George Segall, M.D., chief of the nuclear medicine service at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, and is a professor of radiology and professor of cardiology (by courtesy) at Stanford University School of Medicine, offers insights into the trends he saw at the society's 2011 annual meeting.

Trends in nuclear imaging include the creation of PET/MRI systems, use of time of flight (TOF) imaging, new technqiues to image amyloid plaque in Alzheimer's Disease, and the movement toward multimodlaity imaging rather than radiologists specializing in justy one modality.

More nuclear medicine news and video 

Molecular Imaging | March 22, 2011

An interview with Peter Herscovitch, M.D., chief of the positron emission tomography (PET) department, senior attending physician, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center, who discusses key topics in molecular imaging, including how  how the introduction of new radiotracers will affect the use of PET and SPECT in nuclear imaging and patient therapies. He was the chair of the 2010 committee on scientific program at Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM - SNMMI) annual meeting. 

 

PET Imaging | March 22, 2011

An interview with Peter Herscovitch, M.D., chief of the positron emission tomography (PET) department, senior attending physician, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center, who explains why it is important to develop comparative effectiveness trials of PET.  He was the chair of the 2010 committee on scientific program at Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM - SNMMI) annual meeting.