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VIDEO: One on One with Amy K. Patel, MD, American Association for Women in Radiology Immediate Past President

Breast Imaging | April 15, 2024

Don't miss ITN's latest "One on One" video interview with AAWR Past President and American College of Radiology (ACR) RAN and RADPAC Chair, Amy K. Patel, MD, discussing advocacy initiatives and innovations in artificial intelligence (AI) for breast imaging. 

Dr. Patel is a breast imaging trailblazer and radiology advocacy leader. In this video,  learn how radiologists can support key initiatives, ways AI is improving patient care, and more.

Related content:

Leaders from RadEqual and the AAWR Sign MOU, Solidifying Commitment to Advance Opportunities in Radiology

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

VIDEO: Integrating Artificial Intelligence Into Radiologists Workflow

Information Technology

Breast Imaging | April 15, 2024

Don't miss ITN's latest "One on One" video interview with AAWR Past President and American College of Radiology (ACR) RAN and RADPAC Chair, Amy K. Patel, MD, discussing advocacy initiatives and innovations in artificial intelligence (AI) for breast imaging. 

Dr. Patel is a breast imaging trailblazer and radiology advocacy leader. In this video,  learn how radiologists can support key initiatives, ways AI is improving patient care, and more.

Related content:

Leaders from RadEqual and the AAWR Sign MOU, Solidifying Commitment to Advance Opportunities in Radiology

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

VIDEO: Integrating Artificial Intelligence Into Radiologists Workflow

Information Technology | February 21, 2024

Industry trade shows and conferences seem to be making their comeback in 2024. And the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Global Conference and Exhibition seems particularly poised to deliver the best of the best when it comes to digital transformation in both the delivery of healthcare, but also the delivery of a quality experience for those in this demanding, rapidly evolving industry. This month in our ongoing One on One series with industry leaders, we are talking with Hal Wolf, FHIMSS, president and CEO of HIMSS. He offered insights on the society’s new partnership with Informa Markets, key topics being covered at HIMSS24, AI’s impact on the industry, and his thoughts on healthcare sustainability.

Find more HIMSS24 conference coverage here

A New Partnership for Growth

Last August, Informa Markets and HIMSS announced a landmark partnership to propel the growth and evolution of the HIMSS Global Health Conference and Exhibition, recognized as the most influential healthcare technology event of the year, and in North America. It draws 40,000 health professionals, tech leaders, providers and governmental organizations from across the globe. Informa Markets, the world’s largest exhibition organizer, took on management of the HIMSS Exhibition, while HIMSS continues to oversee developing expert content and programming.

Exciting New Features at HIMSS24

At HIMSS2024, with this new collaboration comes new features, including:

Related content:

Find more HIMSS24 conference coverage here

HIMSS Launches Modernized Infrastructure Adoption Model to Support Global Digital Health Transformation

Top Public Policy Experts at HIMSS24 to Address Global AI Landscape and Digital Transformation in Healthcare

VIDEO: Using Maturity Models to Measure Digital Health

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

Enterprise Imaging | February 15, 2024

Clinicians and referring physicians need fast, secure access to both patient data and their diagnostic or viewing tool set. But the cost barriers and the complexity of owning and maintaining healthcare information systems can compromise the quality of care.

To address this, Philips has partnered with AWS to develop Philips HealthSuite Imaging — a new radiology cloud service that provides on-demand access to advanced medical imaging software.

ITN recently visited with Madhuri Sebastian and Matthieu Ferrant to learn more about this service.

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

Digital Radiography (DR) | February 12, 2024

Agfa Radiology Solutions is committed to enhancing clinical outcomes and operational efficiency, underscoring its innovative edge in the dynamically evolving healthcare landscape. 

AT RSNA23, ITN met with Karol Wesolowski, Global Commercial Excellence Leader, Agfa Radiology Solutions, and Jeroen Spruyt, Head of BU DR, VP Product Supply and Operations, Agfa Radiology Solutions, to learn more about how the company is transforming radiology practices.

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

Related content:

VIDEO: Talking Trends with Agfa — What’s On Tap for RSNA 2023

RSNA | February 07, 2024

At RSNA23, Imaging Technology News (ITN) spoke with Bhvita Jani, principal analyst at Signify Research, about advancements and trends in medical imaging, including the development of coronary CTA, use of molecular imaging in theranostic applications, and remote acquisition support, as well as future outlooks and the evolution of medical imaging.

Related content:

VIDEO: Data Workflow and Orchestration in Medical Imaging

VIDEO: One on One with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD, RSNA President

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

View the RSNA23 Photo Gallery here

One on One ... with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD

Information Technology | January 29, 2024

A discussion on processing, and then understanding, how to implement data workflow and orchestration in medical imaging with Jef Williams, managing partner, Paragon Health IT, and Imaging Technology News (ITN) editorial advisory board member. 

Related content:

VIDEO: One on One with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD, RSNA President

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

View the RSNA23 Photo Gallery here

One on One ... with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD

RSNA | January 22, 2024

Updates on AI in Radiology, RSNA Programs and Stanford Initiatives 

Listen and learn with ITN’s newest “One on One” video discussion with a leader in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). RSNA President Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD, Stanford University, offers not-to-be-missed actionable insights into the application and benefits of artificial intelligence in medical imaging. He also shares highlights from RSNA 2023 and top priorities in the coming year, and summarizes the programs on which he and his Stanford University colleagues are focused.

Related content:

Find more RSNA23 conference coverage here

View the RSNA23 Photo Gallery here

One on One ... with Curtis P. Langlotz, MD, PhD

Radiology Imaging | August 14, 2023

This summer, the Philips Radiology Experience Tour has been bringing Philips imaging modalities directly to the professionals that use them.

This tour offers physicians, technologists and administrators a unique opportunity to see equipment demonstrations and virtual simulations up close and in person!

Imaging Technology News spoke with Flavia Parisi and Tammie Rupnik to learn more about the Philips Radiology Experience Tour and how Philips continues to drive innovation.

If you weren't able to make it to any of the 2023 tour stops, stay tuned because the Tour will return in 2024! 

 

Related Content:

Take a Test Drive on the Philips Radiology Experience Tour

Redefining Radiology

BLOG: Artificial Intelligence Provides Radiologists with Solutions for Today … and Tomorrow

VIDEO: Talking Trends with Philips: Connecting Data and Technology

Philips Advances AI-powered Diagnostic Systems and Transformative Workflow Solutions at RSNA 2022

What Lies Ahead in 2023

Enterprise Imaging | July 20, 2023

Fujifilm recently expanded its enterprise imaging portfolio with Synapse Pathology, the company’s newly acquired and branded digital pathology PACS solution.

Synapse Pathology is an open, vendor-agnostic, end-to-end solution designed for medical facilities that handle large volumes of pathology images and data across multiple locations.

Imaging Technology News recently met with Fujifilm’s Bill Lacy and Mark Lloyd, and Chuck Barkey at West Virginia University Medicine to learn more about this new addition to the Synapse Enterprise Imaging portfolio.

Related content:

Rural Hospital Raises the Bar with Comprehensive State-of-the-art Imaging Systems

Fujifilm’s Synapse Pathology Wins 2023 MedTech Breakthrough Award

Develop, Partner, Acquire or Avoid: Where is Investment for Digital Pathology Headed?

Artificial Intelligence | June 12, 2023

Bayer Calantic and Blackford Analysis have teamed up with new artificial intelligence (AI) innovations to address the radiology challenges of today and tomorrow.

Imaging Technology News recently spoke with Thanos Karras, Head of Bayer Digital Solutions Business Americas, and Ben Panter, Founder and CEO of Blackford Analysis, to learn more about this new relationship and their strategy to drive radiology advancements with artificial intelligence.

Related Bayer Artificial Intelligence Content:

Bayer Offers The Complete Guide to Artificial Intelligence in Radiology, a Free eBook

Bayer Announces Acquisition of Blackford Analysis to Advance AI in Radiology Imaging

Talking Trends with Bayer: Transforming Radiology with Digital Solutions

Information Technology | May 17, 2023

HIMMS is working to bring empirical knowledge and evidence of value and impact of digital maturity measured by the HIMSS maturity models and the Digital Health Indicator (DHI), which is a blueprint for digital health advancement. The maturity models provide prescriptive frameworks to healthcare organizations to help build their digital health ecosystems. ITN spoke with Anne Snowdon, RN, PhD, FAAN, professor of strategy entrepreneurship, Odette Business School, University of Windsor, CEO of SCAN Health and Chief Scientific Research Officer, HIMSS Analytics, to find out more about these models, and what the latest scientific research is telling us.

Dr. Anne Snowdon is a Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Odette School of Business, University of Windsor.  Currently, Dr. Snowdon is the Chief Scientific Research Officer for HIMSS, Vice Chair of the Board of the Directors for Alberta Innovates, and member of the Health Futures Council of Arizona State University (ASU).  She is an Adjunct Faculty at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Windsor, the School of Nursing at Dalhousie University and the Centre for Innovative Medical Technology (CIMT), at the University of Southern Denmark.  Dr. Snowdon is leading a national Community of Practice to advance supply chain resilience across Canada, she has published more than 150 research articles, papers and cases, has received over $24 million in research funding, holds patents and has commercialized a highly successful booster seat product for children traveling in vehicles and is a Fulbright Scholar. She holds a PhD in Nursing from the University of Michigan, an MSc from McGill University, and BScN from Western University.  

Find more HIMSS23 coverage here

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

 

Related Digital Transformation Content:

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Using Maturity Models to Measure Digital Health

Cybersecurity: How Healthcare is at Risk

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

C-COMM: HIMSS New Non-Acute Care Digital Maturity Model

HIMSS Leadership Pinpoints Priority Issues for 2023 Global Conference

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

New Non-Acute Care Roadmap: HIMSS Digital Maturity Model Strategy

 

Information Technology | May 11, 2023

Healthcare is constantly evolving, finding new ways to innovate and advance digital tools and technology. With this comes the need for transformation to keep up with these advancements. ITN spoke with Anne Snowdon, RN, PhD, FAAN, professor of strategy entrepreneurship, Odette Business School, University of Windsor, CEO of SCAN Health and Chief Scientific Research Officer, HIMSS Analytics, to find out more about the steps needed for this transformation and what we can expect to see in the future of healthcare.

Dr. Anne Snowdon is a Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Odette School of Business, University of Windsor.  Currently, Dr. Snowdon is the Chief Scientific Research Officer for HIMSS, Vice Chair of the Board of the Directors for Alberta Innovates, and member of the Health Futures Council of Arizona State University (ASU).  She is an Adjunct Faculty at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Windsor, the School of Nursing at Dalhousie University and the Centre for Innovative Medical Technology (CIMT), at the University of Southern Denmark.  Dr. Snowdon is leading a national Community of Practice to advance supply chain resilience across Canada, she has published more than 150 research articles, papers and cases, has received over $24 million in research funding, holds patents and has commercialized a highly successful booster seat product for children traveling in vehicles and is a Fulbright Scholar. She holds a PhD in Nursing from the University of Michigan, an MSc from McGill University, and BScN from Western University.  

Find more HIMSS23 coverage here

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

 

Related Digital Transformation Content:

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Using Maturity Models to Measure Digital Health

Cybersecurity: How Healthcare is at Risk

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

C-COMM: HIMSS New Non-Acute Care Digital Maturity Model

HIMSS Leadership Pinpoints Priority Issues for 2023 Global Conference

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

New Non-Acute Care Roadmap: HIMSS Digital Maturity Model Strategy

 

Artificial Intelligence | April 26, 2023

Successfully creating and implementing artificial intelligence (AI) and analytic solutions in general requires a number of key factors, including data quality and a certain level of expertise. ITN had a conversation with Julius Bogdan, a leading expert in Digital transformation, Data and analytics, and Artificial intelligence and machine learning, to learn more about the key components needed to create and implement AI and digital transformation solutions.

Julius is Vice President and General Manager, Digital Health Advisory Team for the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). In that role, he leads sales, business development, product management, product marketing and advisory services teams across the continent on digital health transformation. He is responsible for the growth of the HIMSS Analytics portfolio adoption, channel strategy, and cultivating relationships across the provider, payer and public sector health landscape. He also serves on the advisory council of various start-ups and early stage firms in finance and healthcare on technology trends, architecture and market analysis.

 

Find more HIMSS23 content here 

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

 

 

Related Digital Transformation Content:

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Using Maturity Models to Measure Digital Health

Cybersecurity: How Healthcare is at Risk

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

C-COMM: HIMSS New Non-Acute Care Digital Maturity Model

HIMSS Leadership Pinpoints Priority Issues for 2023 Global Conference

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

New Non-Acute Care Roadmap: HIMSS Digital Maturity Model Strategy

Artificial Intelligence | April 18, 2023

With the help of artificial intelligence, cutting-edge technology is being developed that will help improve patient outcomes and build efficiencies in healthcare, which will help transform the future of healthcare delivery. ITN sat down with Julius Bogdan, a leading expert in Digital transformation, Data and analytics, and Artificial intelligence and machine learning, to find out more about the inroads AI is making.

Julius is Vice President and General Manager, Digital Health Advisory Team for the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). In that role, he leads sales, business development, product management, product marketing and advisory services teams across the continent on digital health transformation. He is responsible for the growth of the HIMSS Analytics portfolio adoption, channel strategy, and cultivating relationships across the provider, payer and public sector health landscape. He also serves on the advisory council of various start-ups and early stage firms in finance and healthcare on technology trends, architecture and market analysis.

Find more HIMSS23 content here 

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

Related Digital Transformation Content:

VIDEO: Moving Digital Transformation Forward in Healthcare

VIDEO: Using Maturity Models to Measure Digital Health

Cybersecurity: How Healthcare is at Risk

VIDEO: Key Components to Creating and Implementing AI and Digital Transformation Solutions

C-COMM: HIMSS New Non-Acute Care Digital Maturity Model

HIMSS Leadership Pinpoints Priority Issues for 2023 Global Conference

VIDEO: The Benefits and Pitfalls of Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

VIDEO: A Look at Cybersecurity and How Healthcare is at Risk

New Non-Acute Care Roadmap: HIMSS Digital Maturity Model Strategy

Cybersecurity | April 17, 2023
Enterprise Imaging | March 13, 2023

Philips Radiology Operations Command Center (ROCC) is a vendor-neutral, multi-modality, multi-site telepresence tool that provides advanced tele-acquisition capabilities and connects imaging experts at a Command Center with technologists at scanning locations across an organization.  

Imaging Technology News recently met with Tanuj Gupta, Business Category Leader, Operational Informatics, and Omkar Phanse, Market Leader, Radiology Workflow Solutions, to learn more about this powerful tele-presence tool. 

Find more RSNA22 coverage here

Philips Advances AI-powered Diagnostic Systems and Transformative Workflow Solutions at RSNA 2022

What Lies Ahead in 2023

Artificial Intelligence | February 16, 2023

To mitigate the overwhelming volume of radiology data compounding staff shortages and burnout, Philips AI Solutions helps empower radiology departments by enabling radiologists to efficiently leverage artificial intelligence in their daily clinical routine.  

Philips AI Manager provides a tool that integrates with existing IT and PACS infrastructures, delivering seamless integration of AI benefits into radiology workflow at the point of care.  

Imaging Technology News talked with Tanuj Gupta and Kevin Lev at RSNA22 to learn more about Philips’ AI Solutions.  

Find more RSNA22 coverage here 

PACS | January 27, 2023

Konica Minolta Healthcare recently announced it is working with Amazon Web Services to offer its cloud-based Exa Platform and Symmetry PACS as a Software as a Service model in the Cloud.

Imaging Technology News spoke with Konica Minolta's Kevin Borden and Ash Dhar of AWS at RSNA to learn more about this new venture and how Konica Minolta and Amazon Web Services are working together.

Related Content:

Konica Minolta Healthcare to Extend Exa Platform to the Cloud with AWS

BLOG: Improving Productivity and Simplifying Patient Eligibility for Imaging Practices

Legent Imaging Increases Revenue, Decreases Rejected Claims with Exa Platform and Revenue Cycle Management Solution

Find more RSNA22 coverage here 

Artificial Intelligence | August 18, 2022

Digital solutions like AI and the cloud are driving innovation and transforming the way radiologists and imaging centers approach their work. ITN recently spoke with Alexandre Salvador, vice president and global head of digital business solutions for Bayer's radiology business, about Calantic Digital Solutions, Bayer's new cloud-based platform providing AI applications integrated into the clinical workflow of the radiology department. 

PACS | March 14, 2022

Software automation can help improve many processes, including verifying eligibility for patient exams, navigating the patient responsibility landscape, and meeting the upcoming CDSM mandate for Appropriate Use Criteria. ITN recently spoke with with Kevin Borden, Vice President of Product, HCIT, for Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas about how Konica Minolta is leveraging automation to enhance productivity and efficiency in these areas. 

Related content:

New Exa Platform Functionality Automates Decision Support, Insurance-Related Tasks for Enhanced Productivity and Profitability

More HIMSS 2022 content

Radiation Oncology | February 02, 2022

Douglas E. Holt, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, explains the use of 3-D virtual reality volumetric imaging review to help improve cancer patients’ understanding of their disease and treatment. Pictures are worth a thousand words, and moving pictures inside a patient's body even more. Holt said using virtual reality to go through the patient's anatomy in 3D and to show them what is wrong and how it will be treated offers a new level of understanding that is not possible using a discussion or a couple still images from their medical imaging.

Holt presented this study as a late-breaker at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

Find more ASTRO videos and news

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Enterprise Imaging | January 27, 2022

Rik Primo, principle at Primo Medical Imaging Informatics Consultants and former health IT developer with Siemens, Philips and Agfa, explains the difference cloud-native versus cloud-enabled PACS and radiology enterprise imaging systems. He spoke with ITN during RSNA 2021.the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

Find more RSNA news and video

Related content on enterprise imaging

 

Artificial Intelligence | January 27, 2022

Emanuel Kanal, M.D., FACR, FISMRM, AANG, director of the department of emergency radiology and teleradiology, director of MRI services, and professor of radiology and neuroradiology at the University of Pittsburgh, explains artificial intelligence (AI) is the biggest over all trend in radiology at  the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Trends in Medical Imaging — Interview with Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D.

VIDEO: Examples of Artificial Intelligence Pulmonary Embolism Response Team Apps

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

Computed Tomography (CT) | January 27, 2022

Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic's CT Clinical Innovation Center,  explains how photon-counting computed tomography (CT) detectors work and why it is a better technology over conventional CT systems. She helped Siemens develop the Naeotom Alpha, the first photo-counting CT system to be approved by the FDA in the fall of 2021. She spoke to ITN at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 annual meeting.

Read more about the first commercial photon-counting scanner 

The device uses the emerging CT technology of photon-counting detectors, which can measure each individual X-ray photon that passes through a patient's body, as opposed to current systems which use detectors that measure the total energy contained in many X-rays at once. By "counting" each individual X-ray photon, more detailed information about the patient can be obtained and used to create images with less information that is not useful, such as image noise. 

Current CT technology uses a two-step conversion process to convert X-ray photons into visible light using a scintillator layer in the detector. Then, photo diode light sensors turn the visible light into a digital signal. Due to this intermediate step, important information about the energy of the X-rays is lost and no longer available to aid in diagnosis. Also, contrast is reduced and images are not as clear.

Photon-counting detectors use a single step of direct conversion of X-rays into electrical current, and skips the step of converting X-rays into visible light. This allows the energy thresholds of each pulse to be collected and binned based on different kilovolt (kV) energy levels. This creates data to improve contrast and enable dual-energy, spectral imaging. The direct conversion also helps improve image quality without information loss. This improves image sharpness and contrast.

Photon-counting detectors have already been used for several years in high-energy physics and nuclear imaging. However, these previously generation photon-counting detectors could not be used with a clinical CT scanner because they could not keep up with the high higher rate of photons reaching the detector. The detector on the Naeotom Alpha was designed for this increased speed.

Related Photon-counting CT Content:

Mayo Clinic Begins Use of Third-Generation Photon-counting CT Clinical Research Detector

VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology — Interview with Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D.

VIDEO: Photon Counting Detectors Will be the Next Major Advance in Computed Tomography — Interview with Todd Villines, M.D.

Key Trends in Cardiac CT at SCCT 2020

GE Healthcare Pioneers Photon Counting CT with Prismatic Sensors Acquisition

Top Trend Takeaways in Radiology From RSNA 2020

NeuroLogica Joins Forces with Massachusetts General Hospital to Pilot Photon Counting CT at the Patient’s Point-Of-Care Using OmniTom Elite CT

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.

Artificial Intelligence | January 13, 2022

Here are two examples of artificial intelligence (AI) driven pulmonary embolism (PE) response team apps featured by vendors Aidoc and Viz.AI at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2021 meeting.

The AI scans computed tomography (CT) image datasets as they came off the imaging system and looked for evidence of PE. If detected by the algorithm, it immediately sends an alert to the stroke care team members via smartphone messaging. This is done before the images are even loaded into the PACS. The radiologist on the team can use a link on the app to open the CT dataset and has basic tools for scrolling, windowing and leveling to determine if there is a PE and the severity. The team can then use the app to send messages, access patient information, imaging and reports. This enabled them all to be on the same page and can communicate quickly via mobile devices, rather than being required to use dedicated workstations in the hospital. 

Both vendors showed similar apps for stroke at RSNA 2019. That idea for rapid alerts, diagnosis and communications for acute care teams has now expanded to PE and also for aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). AI.Viz and Aidoc are looking at expanding this type of technology for other acute care team rolls, including heart failure response. 

Read more about this technology in the article AI Can Facilitate Automated Activation of Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

Enterprise Imaging | January 13, 2022

Steve Holloway, company director at Signify Research, explains the trends he has seen over the past couple years in enterprise imaging. He spoke to ITN at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America meeting.

Holloway shared how medical imaging systems are expanding to include all departments in healthcare system enterprises that generate data, images and waveforms, so these items can be stored in a central location, rather than disparate silos or in separate systems requiring multiple logins or specific workstations. Most of these systems are are web enabled or web based, allowing users to work from anywhere as long as they have an internet connection. Most enterprise imaging systems also use a web-based vendor neutral archive, allowing DICOM and non-DICOM images to be stored there. All of these features allow easier and faster access to patient information and images.

He said these systems are becoming more inclusive of ologies outside of radiology and cardiology. Most notably is digital pathology, which was featured by many enterprise imaging vendors at RSNA 2021. 

Enterprise imaging systems are also accepting point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS), which has exploded in use over the past two years with COVID, Holloway said.

Find more RSNA news and video

VIDEO: Trends in Radiology IT seen at RSNA 2021 — Interview with Jef Williams, Paragon Consultants

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Trends in Medical Imaging — Interview with Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D, from Signify Research

VIDEO: Examples of Improved PACS Workflow to Aid Speed and Efficiency 

VIDEO: The New Normal of Home Workstations, Teleradiology and Remote Reading — Interview with Elizabeth Hawk, M.D.

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2019
 

 

Enterprise Imaging | January 06, 2022

Jef Williams, MBA, PMP, CIIP, managing partner, Paragon Consulting Partners LLC, explains trends he saw at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. These include radiology IT trends in the evolution of enterprise imaging, increasing use of artificial intelligence (AI) and the movement to web-based systems.

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Trends in Medical Imaging — Interview with Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D, from Signify Research

VIDEO: Trends in Enterprise Imaging From Signify Research — Interview with Steve Holloway, Signify Research

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology 2021

Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2019

VIDEO: Examples of Improved PACS Workflow to Aid Speed and Efficiency 

VIDEO: The New Normal of Home Workstations, Teleradiology and Remote Reading — Interview with Elizabeth Hawk, M.D.

VIDEO: Mammography Trends and Advances at RSNA 2021 — Interview with Stamatia Destounis, M.D.

Find more RSNA news and video

Teleradiology | December 10, 2021

Elizabeth Hawk, M.D., Ph.D., director of innovation Engagement at Rad Partners, a regional president for Matrix Teleradiology, and assistant professor of medicine at Stanford, explains how the COVID-19 pandemic has helped advance home reading and changed radiology.

While teleradiology and remote reading is not new, its expansion was greatly accelerated in 2020-2021 due to COVID. Early in the pandemic, hospitals tried to get as many of their employees as possible to work remotely, and radiologists who wanted to read from home were allowed to do so in large numbers. The past two years has taught many people that remote reading from home is possible and it also can aid the balance between work and family life. Hawk said remote reading will likely be the new normal even after the pandemic.

Hawk presented in a session on this topic at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. She said many radiologists from her practice were already reading from home prior to the pandemic, so they had the experience to quickly ramp up expansion during COVID. She offers advice to hospitals that want to introduce or expand home radiology reading. 

Find more teleradiology news

Find more RSNA news and video

Artificial Intelligence | December 08, 2021

Sanjay Parekh, Ph.D., Signify Research senior market analyst, explains some of the recent trends in the application of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology at the 2021 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

He discusses three trends in AI at RSNA, including:
   • AI-based critical care team tools for rapid communication and assessment of patient imaging. This is activated by an AI first pass review of the images. This includes response team alerts for pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, aortic dissection and acute heart failure.
   • AI systems now offering numerous algorithms to perform multiple tasks, rather than a single function, adding greater valve for those AI apps.
   • Greater integration of AI apps into PACS so it fits into the radiology workflow.

Find more AI news

Find more RSNA news and video

Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | November 12, 2021

An example of the Varian Noona software used by clinicians to interface with oncology patients demonstrated at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. It allows bi-direction communication between the care team and the patient’s smartphone. This included reporting complains about side effects, pain, questions for the physician and surveys. The data the interfaces with the patient record so anyone on the care team can access it or reach out to the patient.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Enterprise Imaging | September 03, 2021

ITN Editor Dave Fornell collected numerous examples of how PACS and enterprise imaging vendors are improving the speed and workflow of their systems during booth demonstrations at the 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS). The 11 minute video condenses down the highlights of workflow efficiencies seen during two days o vendor booth tours.

There was a clear trend of many vendors moving to new platforms that leverage more modern cloud-platform interfaces. This enables faster study loading speeds over web connections. These platforms are also using deeper integration of third-party applications and artificial intelligence (AI) software that do not require separate logins or workflows. Read more about these key trends observed at HIMSS 2021.

Vendors also showed various ways they have speed up radiology workflows. These included easier to customize hanging protocols, automated fetching of prior exams, synchronizing views and scrolling between a current a prior exams, use of timeline views of patient priors and procedures to make it easier to find relevant images and reports, and integration of all types of images into one unified viewer. 

Specific examples in this video include: 
   • Visage Imaging: Example of high speed cloud PACS access to 3D mammograms and and priors. This first video clip shows a demonstration of opening large datasets in a matter of a couple seconds over a network connection from a tethered cellphone.
   • Visage Imaging: Ability to access multiple modalities on one PACS viewer
   • GE Healthcare: Examples of fast access to priors and location on screen 
   • GE Healthcare: Example of deep integration of third-party AI software
   • Siemens: Overview of its Lung AI Pathway Companion workflow  
   • Change Healthcare: Enabling fast ability to free rotate around lung anatomy rather than going slice by slice manually 
   • Change Healthcare: Color-coded bar shows loading progress of an image or data set
   • Infinitt: Hanging protocol automation to find same view on prior and link for synchronized scrolling   
   • Infinitt: Use of timeline to get quick view of prior reports and images without needing to open whole exam 
   • Siemens: Example of deeper integration with third-party apps, in this case Epsilon strain echo analysis  
   • Fujifilm: Integrated advanced visualization in the radiology workflow for liver segmentation used for surgical or embolization planning 
   • Fujifilm: Example of life-like cinematic rendering of a CT scan offers new ways to view anatomy and explain it to a patient 
   • Visage Imaging: Example of enterprise platform able to bring in full original format advanced visualization reconstructed images on a single platform viewer

Related Medical Imaging IT Content From HIMSS 2021:

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

HIMSS 2021 Showed What to Expect From In-person Healthcare Conferences During the COVID Pandemic

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

VIDEO: Examples of COVID-19 CT Scan Analysis Software

 

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 31, 2021

Several radiology IT vendors at 2021 Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference demonstrated computed tomography (CT) imaging advanced visualization software software to help automatically identify and quantify COVID-19 pneumonia in the lungs. These tools can help speed assessment of the lung involvement and serial tracking can be used to assess the patient's progress in the hospital and during long-COVID observation. 

Examples of COVID analysis tool shown in this video include clips from booth tours at: 
   • Fujifilm
   • Siemens Healthineers 
   • Canon (Vital)

Canon received FDA clearance for its tool under and emergency use authorization (EUA).

Siemens said its tool was part of its lung analysis originally developed for cancer but modified and prioritized to aid in COVID assessments. 
 

HIMSS Related Content:

Advances in CVIS and Enterprise iImaging at HIMSS 21

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D.

VIDEO: Coordinating Followup for Radiology Incidental Findings — Interview with David Danhauer, M.D.

VIDEO: Cardiology AI Aggregates Patient Data and Enables Interactive Risk Assessments

VIDEO: Example of Epsilon Strain Imaging Deep Integration With Siemens CVIS

 

Information Technology | August 30, 2021

David Danhauer, M.D., FAAP, FHIMSS, chief medical information officer, Owensboro Health, Owensboro, Ky., explains the implementation of healthcare information technology (IT) to coordinate followup on incidental radiology findings. He presented on this topic in a session at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 meeting. 

Their system starts with key words being identified to flag incidental findings by the voice recognition system used to enter radiology report information. IT interfaces with the electronic medical record create a list of patients that need followup and what departments the incidental findings relate to so a coordinator can connect the patient with the proper subspecialty.

Danhauer said many of the incidental findings at his center include lung nodules and abdominal aortic aneurisms. In the past, many of these were lost to followup, but the new system now promotes follow through to get the patient the care they need. This has helped increase revenue, improve patient care and lowers the health system's liability profile. 

The system experienced several patient safety events due to gaps in care coordination with incidental findings documented in the radiology report, but missed by referring physicians. A patient safety initiative he helped implement automating the workflow resulted in a nine-fold increase in identifying and communicating incidental findings for improved patient safety. 

Read about more advances in PACS and enterprise imaging at HIMSS 21.

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2021

VIDEO: Importance of Body Part Labeling in Enterprise Imaging — Interview with Alex Towbin, M.D. 

 

 

 

Enterprise Imaging | August 27, 2021

Alex Towbin, M.D., Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center CMIO, Radiology Department associate chief of clinical operations and informatics, and chair of radiology informatics, spoke in an enterprise imaging session at the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2021 meeting and highlight the importance of a standardizing body part labeling to enable imaging consumption, image sharing, greater levels of interoperability and image-based artificial intelligence (AI) research. 

He described the process by which existing body part ontologies were evaluated, how the HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging Community raised awareness of the issues caused by the lack of an industry-standard body-part ontology, and the process by which an industry standard will be selected. Finally, the speakers will discuss how the HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging Community plans to advocate for the selected ontology to be incorporated as part of existing standards such as DICOM and HL7 FHIR.

In the video he outlines three metadata elements needed to selection of a relevant comparison imaging examination. He also explains how the HIMSS-SIIM EIC convened experts to select a standard body part ontology for use in enterprise imaging
Describe the HIMSS-SIIM EIC’s plan to foster adoption of a standard body part ontology for use in enterprise imaging
 

Advances in PACS and Cardiology Information Systems at HIMSS 2021

Find more HIMSS content

Enterprise Imaging | August 06, 2021

Integrated Speech recognition solutions are becoming a necessary part of radiology reporting platforms. Konica Minolta recently announced a partnership with nVoq to integrate a speech to text solution into their Exa Platform. 

ITN recently spoke with Kevin Borden, Vice President of Product, Healthcare IT for Konica Minolta and Chad Hiner, Vice President of Customer Experience for nVoq, to talk about how this integration is improving the Exa user experience.

Related enterprise imaging content:

Talking Trends with Konica Minolta

BLOG: Zero-footprint Viewer with Server-side Rendering Pushes Imaging Forward During Pandemic

BLOG: Exa Gateway Offers a New Way to Deliver Teleradiology 

BLOG: Artificial Intelligence for Clinical Decision Support and Increased Revenues

BLOG: The Power of the Next Generation of RIS

 

Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2021

This is an overview of trends and technologies in radiology artificial intelligence (AI) applications in 2021. Views were shared by 11 radiologists using AI and industry leaders, which include:

• Randy Hicks, M.D., MBA, radiologist and CEO of Reginal Medical Imaging (RMI), and an iCAD Profound AI user.

• Prof. Dr. Thomas Frauenfelder, University of Zurich, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, and Riverain AI user. 

• Amy Patel, M.D., medical director of Liberty Hospital Women’s Imaging, assistant professor of radiology at UMKC, and user of Kios AI for breast ultrasound. 

• Sham Sokka, Ph.D., vice president and head of innovation, precision diagnosis, Philips Healthcare.

• Ivo Dreisser, Siemens Healthineers, global marketing manager for the AI Rad Companion.

• Bill Lacey, vice president of medical informatics, Fujifilm Medical Systems USA.

• Karley Yoder, vice president and general manager, artificial intelligence, GE Healthcare.

• Georges Espada, head of Agfa Healthcare digital and computed radiography business unit.

• Pooja Rao, head of research and development and co-founder of Qure.ai.

• Jill Hamman, world-wide marketing manager at Carestream Health.

• Sebastian Nickel, Siemens Healthineers, global product manager for the AI Pathway Companion. 

There has been a change in attitudes about AI on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) over the last two years. AI conversations were originally 101 level and discussed how AI technology could be trained to sort photos of dogs and cats. However, in 2020, with numerous FDA approvals for various AI applications, the conversations at RSNA, and industry wide, have shifted to that of accepting the validity of AI. Radiologists now want to discuss how a specific AI algorithm is going to help them save time, make more accurate diagnoses and make them more efficient.

With a higher level of maturity in AI and the technology seeing wider adoption, radiologists using it say AI gives them additional confidence in their diagnoses, and can even help readers who may not be deep experts in the exam type they are being asked to read. 

With a myriad of new AI apps gaining regulatory approval from scores of imaging vendors, the biggest challenge for getting this technology into hospitals is an easy to integrate format. This has led to several vendors creating AI app stores. These allow AI apps to integrate easily into radiology workflows because the apps are already integrated as third-party software into a larger radiology vendors' IT platform.  

There are now hundreds of AI applications that do a wide variety of analysis, from data analytics, image reconstruction, disease and anatomy identification, automating measurements and advanced visualization. The AI applications can be divided into 2 basic types — AI to improve workflow, and AI for clinical decision support, such as diagnostic aids.

On the workflow side, several vendors are leveraging AI to pull together all of a patients' information, prior exams and reports in one location and to digest the information so it is easier for the radiologist to consume. Often the AI pulls only data and priors that relate to a specific question being asked, based on the imaging protocol used for the exam. One example of this is the Siemens Healthineers AI Clinical Pathway and Siemens AI integrations with PACS to automate measurements and advanced visualization.

AI is also helping simplify complex tasks and help reduce the reading time on involved exams. One example of this is in 3-D breast tomosythesis with hundreds of images, which is rapidly replacing 2-D mammography, which only produces 4 images. Another example is automated image reconstruction algorithms to significantly reduce manual work. AI also is now being integrated directly into several vendors' imaging systems to speed workflow and improve image quality.

Vendors say AI is here to stay. They explain the future of AI will be automation to help improve image quality, simplify manual processes, improved diagnostic quality, new ways to analyze data, and workflow aids that operate in the background as part of a growing number of software solutions. 

Several vendors at RSNA 2020 noted that AI's biggest impact in the coming years will be its ability to augment and speed the workflow for the small number of radiologists compared to the quickly growing elder patient populations worldwide. There also are applications in rural and developing countries were there are very low numbers of physicians or specialists.

 

Related AI in Medical Imaging Content:

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Selecting an AI Marketplace for Radiology: Key Considerations for Healthcare Providers

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Northwestern Medicine Introduces Artificial Intelligence to Improve Ultrasound Imaging

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 19, 2021

Darryl B. Sneag, M.D., a radiologist and director of peripheral nerve MRI at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City, explains how artificial intelligence (AI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction algorithms have cut imaging times by 50 percent. This has enabled his facility to maintain the same number of patients as it did prior to the pandemic, while still having time to sterilize the scanners after each patient. 

Many radiology departments are now experiencing a backlog of cases due to COVID-19 shutdowns in 2020 and the limits on the number of patients that can be in the hospital for imaging exams due to pandemic containment precautions. Sneag said AI is now playing a role in helping streamline workflow.

HSS has 19 GE Healthcare MRI scanners and uses the Air Recon DL AI image reconstruction algorithm. This allows for shorter scan times, so the same number of patients as pre-pandemic can be imaged per day, even with deeper cleaning of the MRI bore. Sneag explains the algorithm has greatly helped with patient throughput, but the trade off is sometimes getting a ringing artifact on images.

HSS also uses GE's Air Coil flexible pad MRI coils. These can wrap around the patient to improve comfort and get the coils closer to the anatomy being imaged.

 

Related MRI and COVID Content:

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Find more COVID radiology-related content

 

PET-CT | December 04, 2020

This is an example of Canon's Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) AI-driven image reconstruction software that is now being used to improve image quality on the Canon Celesteion Prime PET/CT nuclear imaging system. The deep learning is used to enhance the iterative reconstruction used to reduce noise and sharped high contrast resolution on positron emission tomography (PET) images from the digital PET detector used on the system. 

This example is a whole-body FGD PET scan of a patient with a large BMI with lung cancer.

The Cartesion Prime PET/CT is the industry’s only air-cooled digital PET/CT, provides variable bed time (vBT) acquisition as a standard feature. This and the new FDA 510(k)-pending AiCE technology were highlighted at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. 

Find more RSNA news

 

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