Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 13, 2017

GE Healthcare Launches Blanket-Like Air Technology MRI Coils

New coil design is 60 percent lighter than conventional coils, provides more flexibility and conforms to a patient’s anatomy regardless of shape or size

GE Healthcare Launches Blanket-Like Air Technology MRI Coils

December 13, 2017 — GE Healthcare announced U.S. FDA 510(k) clearance of its new Air Technology, what it calls an industry-first suite of radiofrequency (RF) coils that enables total freedom in coil positioning and handling during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The new coil design is 60 percent lighter than conventional coils, benefiting both patients and technologists, offers greater flexibility in all axes to help conform to patients’ anatomies and fits all patient ages, sizes and shapes.

Air Technology uses a flexible conductor material that allows each coil element to be closer to the anatomy to improve signal reception, depth of penetration and image quality. Its ultra-lightweight and flexible design makes it easier for the technologist to position the coil on the patient.

 “In my opinion, one of the greatest advancements in MR is Air Coil Technology,” said Tammy Heydle, senior MR technologist at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and part of the team who evaluated the Air Technology Suite in a clinical study. “There are almost endless possibilities for its use. The Air Coils are light like a blanket, versatile and very comfortable for patient positioning.”

The unique electrical properties of Air Technology also address clinical productivity by minimizing coil coupling between elements and enabling arrays with higher element density and more robust parallel imaging with higher acceleration factors.

“I’m pleased with the image quality,” said Scott Reeder, professor of radiology, chief of MRI, vice chair of research at University of Wisconsin – Madison, who led the clinical study. “The coils have great signal- to-noise-ratio. And our patients have given us excellent feedback on the overall comfort of the coil.”

By avoiding the copper etching of elements in traditional coil manufacturing, flexible Air Coils are constructed using a sustainable manufacturing process that is up to 90 percent greener through a reduction of typical electronics and packaging waste. Air Technology also consumes 50 percent less power compared to conventional coils.

Air Technology is currently available on Signa Premier, GE Healthcare’s newest wide bore 3.0T MRI system. It is available as a 48-channel head coil designed to fit 99.9 percent of patients, a 30-channel anterior array providing 65 cm of coverage and a 60-channel posterior array providing 110 cm of coverage.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

Related Content

Videos | Cardiac Imaging | August 12, 2020
Advanced visualization company...
Rafael Rivero, M.D., Global Head of Medical Affairs at MSI, said: "The importance of MyoStrain cannot be understated because of the test's immense clinical value and ability to quantify intramyocardial dysfunction across 48 segments of the heart. In a six-heartbeat MRI scan, MyoStrain arms physicians with novel clinical information about a patient's heart health."
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 11, 2020
August 11, 2020 — Myocardial Solutions, Inc. and United Imaging, Inc.
SyntheticMR announced its imaging software SyMRI is compatible with additional scanners from Siemens Healthineers on the US market, including 1.5T scanners such as Magnetom Altea, Sola and Sola Fit, as well as 3T scanners such as MAGNETOM Skyra and Prisma.
News | Information Technology | August 11, 2020
August 11, 2020 — SyntheticMR announced its imaging softwar
A special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences features stories about the interpersonal skills beyond the technical aspects to care for and guide patients through medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures

Image courtesy of Canon

News | Patient Engagement | August 11, 2020
August 11, 2020 — "I went into the MRI
High resolution in-vivo MR-STAT using a matrix-free and parallelized reconstruction algorithm being developed by Philips and UMC.

In-vivo T1, T2 and proton density maps reconstructed with MR-STAT using eight (first column), four (second column), two (third column) and one (fourth column) of the acquired k-spaces in the reconstruction. The acquisition times were 13.6, 6.8, 3.4 and 1.7 seconds respectively on a 1.5T Philips Ingenia MRI system. Find more images and information in this article.[1] 

 

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 10, 2020
August 10, 2020 — During the International Society for Magnetic...
Imaging volumes in hospitals and practices previously slowed by the coronavirus pandemic continue to hold steady, according to new QuickPoLL survey results that gauge how radiologists feel about current business and the impact of COVID-19.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 03, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Imaging volumes in hospitals and practices previously slowed by the coronavirus pandemic continue to hold steady, acc
Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 31, 2020
July 31, 2020 — In the thick of the COVID-19 eme
It covers every major modality, including breast imaging/mammography, fixed and portable C-arms (cath, IR/angio, hybrid, OR), CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, radiographic fluoroscopy, ultrasound and X-ray
News | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2020
July 29, 2020 — IMV Medical Information, part of Scien...