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VIDEO: First FLASH Proton Therapy Trial Completed in Humans

Proton Therapy | May 16, 2022

John C. Breneman, M.D., medical director of the Cincinnati Children's/UC Health Proton Therapy Center, and the principal investigator of the FAST-01 trial, explains FLASH therapy and details on the trial. This study is testing the use of a single FLASH proton therapy session, rather than weeks of fractionated doses.

FLASH and hypo fractionated therapy have been among the hottest topics in radiation oncology. The premise of FLASH is to deliver extremely high doses of radiation to a tumor in one, short dose. Lab testing has shown this actually has a healthy tissue sparing capability and may help in reducing collateral damage.  

If this and other trials show benefit and improved outcomes from FLASH, it is possible this may become the primary treatment method for many cancers in the years to come. Reducing therapy to one treatment session also would open up much more time for proton centers so many more patients could be treated. It also would be a significant time and cost savings for patients and their families, who would not be required to stay at nearby hotels for extended stays during their course of treatment.  

Cincinnati Children's/UC Health Proton Therapy Center announced the completion of enrollment in FAST-01 (FeAsibility Study of FLASH Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Symptomatic Bone Metastases) in October. This is the first human clinical trial of FLASH therapy, which centered on patients with metastases in arms and legs to avoid irradiating critical structures. If this trials shows benefits and low toxicity, followup studies will attempt more complex treatments in other parts of the body.

Related ASTRO 2021 Radiation Oncology Content:

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021 

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

VIDEO: Sedating Children With Movies Rather Than Drugs for Radiation Therapy — Interview with Jeffrey T. Chapman

VIDEO: 4 Radiation Oncology Technologies to Watch — Interview with Anthony Zietman, M.D.

VIDEO: Advances in Radiopharmaceutical Therapy — Interview with Ana Kiess, M.D., Ph.D.

VIDEO: MRI-Linac and PSMA PET Imaging Technologies Aids Therapy at GenesisCare — Interview with Walter Curran, Jr. M.D., 

VIDEO: Elekta Harmony Radiotherapy System Walk-around

VIDEO Example of the Varian Noona Bidirection Oncology Patient Interface Software

VIDEO: Examples of Cherenkov Radiation Imaging During Radiation Therapy

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology

Proton Therapy | May 16, 2022

John C. Breneman, M.D., medical director of the Cincinnati Children's/UC Health Proton Therapy Center, and the principal investigator of the FAST-01 trial, explains FLASH therapy and details on the trial. This study is testing the use of a single FLASH proton therapy session, rather than weeks of fractionated doses.

FLASH and hypo fractionated therapy have been among the hottest topics in radiation oncology. The premise of FLASH is to deliver extremely high doses of radiation to a tumor in one, short dose. Lab testing has shown this actually has a healthy tissue sparing capability and may help in reducing collateral damage.  

If this and other trials show benefit and improved outcomes from FLASH, it is possible this may become the primary treatment method for many cancers in the years to come. Reducing therapy to one treatment session also would open up much more time for proton centers so many more patients could be treated. It also would be a significant time and cost savings for patients and their families, who would not be required to stay at nearby hotels for extended stays during their course of treatment.  

Cincinnati Children's/UC Health Proton Therapy Center announced the completion of enrollment in FAST-01 (FeAsibility Study of FLASH Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Symptomatic Bone Metastases) in October. This is the first human clinical trial of FLASH therapy, which centered on patients with metastases in arms and legs to avoid irradiating critical structures. If this trials shows benefits and low toxicity, followup studies will attempt more complex treatments in other parts of the body.

Related ASTRO 2021 Radiation Oncology Content:

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021 

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

VIDEO: Sedating Children With Movies Rather Than Drugs for Radiation Therapy — Interview with Jeffrey T. Chapman

VIDEO: 4 Radiation Oncology Technologies to Watch — Interview with Anthony Zietman, M.D.

VIDEO: Advances in Radiopharmaceutical Therapy — Interview with Ana Kiess, M.D., Ph.D.

VIDEO: MRI-Linac and PSMA PET Imaging Technologies Aids Therapy at GenesisCare — Interview with Walter Curran, Jr. M.D., 

VIDEO: Elekta Harmony Radiotherapy System Walk-around

VIDEO Example of the Varian Noona Bidirection Oncology Patient Interface Software

VIDEO: Examples of Cherenkov Radiation Imaging During Radiation Therapy

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | February 16, 2022

Elekta’s latest linear accelerator, Harmony, is designed to provide a productive and versatile radiotherapy solution for both mature and developing markets. ITN recently spoke with Chris Gilpin, Global Product Marketing Manager, and Emily Basset, Global Clinical Marketing Manager, to learn more about the treatment system. 

Related content:

Growing Use of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy for Diagnosis and Treatment

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

VIDEO: Elekta Harmony Radiotherapy System Walk-around

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

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Radiation Therapy | February 02, 2022

Magdalena Bazalova-Carter, Ph.D., assistant professor, University of Victoria University, discusses the current state of ultra-high dose FLASH radiation therapy at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting. Flash therapy is said to be a key technology to keep an eye on in the next few years. If it proves viable in human patients, it promises to greatly shorten treatment times, and reduce fractions to between 1-3 sessions.

The idea is that a super-high dose of radiation is delivered in one large, very fast dose. It appears that despite the high dose of radiation, there is a tissue sparing biology mechanism that is not yet fully understood, where health tissue is preserved and there is less collateral damage than the standard series of lower dose fractions over days or weeks.  

Flash therapy is being tested in electron beam therapy systems to treat superficial cancers, which are much easier to adopt to flash than deeper tissue tumors. Proton may be able to produce the higher energies needed for deeper tumor treatments, but current photon beam systems are limited because to deliver the high doses needed may cause enough heat to melt the X-ray beam source.

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology | February 02, 2022

Brian S. Bingham, M.D., chief resident in radiation oncology at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, explains the practice-level and national cost burden of treatment-related prior authorization for academic radiation oncology practices. This was a highlighted study presented at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

 

Radiation Therapy | February 02, 2022

Nima Nabavizadeh, M.D., radiation oncologist and associate professor of radiation medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, explains the use of external-beam radiation therapy as a bridge to transplant in hepatocellular carcinoma cancer patients.

He presented a utilization analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology | February 02, 2022

Bridget F. Koontz, M.D., chief medical officer at GenesisCare USA explains how to manage the complex needs of pelvic radiotherapy survivors. She offers an. overview of published evidence about the various toxicity types and approaches for managing them.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

 

Radiation Oncology | February 02, 2022

Douglas E. Holt, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, explains the use of 3-D virtual reality volumetric imaging review to help improve cancer patients’ understanding of their disease and treatment. Pictures are worth a thousand words, and moving pictures inside a patient's body even more. Holt said using virtual reality to go through the patient's anatomy in 3D and to show them what is wrong and how it will be treated offers a new level of understanding that is not possible using a discussion or a couple still images from their medical imaging.

Holt presented this study as a late-breaker at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

Find more ASTRO videos and news

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 24, 2021

Jeffrey T. Chapman, a medical student at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Explains how watching movies can be used to help sedate pediatric radiation therapy patients. He presented the results of the Pediatric Radiation Oncology With Movie Induced Sedation Effect (PROMISE) study at the 2021 American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

Children usually have to be sedated with anesthesia to keep them immobile each day for weeks for their daily fractions of radiotherapy. This presents problems because the child will have side effects from the anesthesia and face issues with eating only at certain times. UTSW developed a system where the child can watch a movie and if they move the movie and the radiation beam both immediately shut off. This trains the child to stay still during treatments without the need for anesthesia.

7 Trends in Radiation Therapy at ASTRO 2021

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | November 17, 2021

Ana Kiess, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiation oncology and molecular radiation sciences, Johns Hopkins University, explains the current state of patient-centered radiopharmaceutical therapy at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. 

She discusses development and use over the past decade of Radium-223 dichloride and Lutetium-177 dotatate. Kiess also expects there will be targeted injectable radiopharmaceuticals for nearly all solid tumor types in the next decade. She said her center is currently investigating the use of radiopharma agents to treat oligometastatic metastatic cancers.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 17, 2021

The Elekta Harmony radiotherapy system gained FDA clearance in the summer of 2021 and was on display for the first time at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. It offers fast treatments and the ability to track and treat multiple metastases at the same time. 

It has a large round screen on the machine so the patient's information is immediately available table side. It uses facial recognition to verify the correct patient is in the room for treatment.

The speed of the treatment delivery increased over that of prior systems, so the time a patient spends in the treatment room for lung SBRT went from 30 minutes down to less than 2 minutes. SBRT prostate went down from 5 minutes to 90 seconds. It also can perform hypofractionation lung therapy in a single 20 minute treatment.

Read more on the Harmony system. 

 

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology | November 16, 2021

This is a model of the Toshiba ion beam radiation therapy system at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. It shows the cyclotron, beam lines and two treatment rooms, one with a fixed beam and second with a rotating gantry.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology | November 16, 2021

Walter Curran, Jr. M.D., FACR, FASCO, GenesisCare global chief medical officer, discusses three technologies that are helping advance radiation oncology care during the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. These technology advances include:

   • Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for prostate cancer.

   • MRI-linear accelerator (Linac) systems that allow real-time imaging during radiation therapy.

   • Remote treatment planning to help radiation treatment centers that are in rural areas.

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. The new PSMA PET imaging is expected to significantly improve how prostate cancer is detected and treated. The FDA approved the drug for PET nuclear imaging of PSMA-positive lesions in men with prostate cancer. 68Ga-PSMA-11 is a radioactive imaging agent that binds to prostate cancer cells to help localize prostate cancer cells.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Oncology | November 16, 2021

This is an example of a multileaf collimator (MLC) on the Accuray Thomotherapy radiation therapy system at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. MLCs are made of steel leaves that rapidly open and close to shape the radiation beam to match the size of the tumor in the treatment plan as the radiation beam moves around a patient. The MLC blocks the beam from hitting surrounding healthy tissue.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 15, 2021

Anthony Zietman, M.D., interim chief, radiation oncology, Mass General Cancer Center, and former president of the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), explains some of the recent technology trends to watch in radiation oncology at the ASTRO 2021 meeting.

He said four technologies to watch include:
   • Proton therapy
   • FLASH therapy
   • Image guided radiotherapy
   • PET guided radiotherapy

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 15, 2021

Siemens and Philips demonstrated examples of new imaging software to convert MRI datasets into synthetic computed tomography (CT) datasets at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. The synthetic CT datasets can be used for radiotherapy treatment planning. This eliminates the need for a separate CT scan, reducing time and cost in patient care. 

The technology uses an algorithm to convert the MRI dataset into a CT grayscale Hounsfield units. The Hounsfield units correlate with the densities of the various tissues and are used to calculate the doses required and beam routes needed in radiotherapy to treat a patient.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | November 12, 2021

An example of the Varian Noona software used by clinicians to interface with oncology patients demonstrated at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. It allows bi-direction communication between the care team and the patient’s smartphone. This included reporting complains about side effects, pain, questions for the physician and surveys. The data the interfaces with the patient record so anyone on the care team can access it or reach out to the patient.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 11, 2021

This is Reflexion’s X1 LINAC radiotherapy system on display at ASTRO 2021. It recently gained FDA clearance for standard SBRT, IMRT and SRS. However, the real value of the system is that it was designed for biologically guided radiotherapy, where PET radiotracer detectors can image metastases and the system can target each one with real time adaptive radiotherapy. That technology is currently involved in a FDA IDE trial. If it gains FDA clearance in the coming years, the technology promises to significantly speed treatment of metastatic disease. The system in 2021 currently is installed at the University of Texas Southwest,Stanford and City of Hope.

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

Radiation Therapy | November 11, 2021

An example of flexible bolus made from silicone on molds that were 3-D printed from patient CT scans. These are very flexible, so more comfortable for the patient than 3D printed plastic. These are used to attenuate electron beam radiation therapy (EBRT) doses in treating skin cancers. This a new product, FlexiBol,  from Decimal shown for the first time at the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 meeting. 

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

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Radiation Therapy | November 11, 2021

DoseOptic gained FDA clearance in 2020 for its Cherenkov radiation imaging system for use during radiation therapy treatments so the irradiated field can be visualized. The system can show areas where there is misalignment of the beam, or needless irradiation of health tissue. They showed examples at American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2021 of whole breast radiotherapy, where the edge of beam hit the patient's chin and arm. One video showed how a patient moved and they placed their arm in the treatment field. 

Photo Gallery of Technologies at ASTRO 2021

Radiation Oncology Research Featured at ASTRO 2021

Find more radiation oncology technology news

 

Information Technology | December 01, 2020

Treating cancer effectively often includes a combination of patient therapies. In recent years, technology advancements have led to a more efficient and personalized approach to treatment. Andrew Wilson, President of Oncology Informatics at Elekta, discussed the latest software advancements with ITN.

Radiation Therapy | November 15, 2020

Bruce Bauer, Ph.D., CEO of TAE Life Sciences. The company is developing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a new radiation therapy for cancer. A patient is first infused with a non-toxic boron-10 compound, which selectively accumulates in tumor tissue. A neutron beam is then focused on the tumor and the neutrons are captured by the boron and causes emission of alpha radiation particles within the tumor. Alpha particles have a a very short range, so this helps spare surrounding healthy tissue from radiation damage. 

Historically, BNCT clinical studies have been carried out using boronophenylalanine (BPA) and neutrons derived from the core of a nuclear reactor. While the clinical outcomes have been encouraging, the availability of better boron-10 compounds and access to a neutron source posed a significant barrier to clinical research and adoption of BNCT as a practical cancer therapy.

There is now a renaissance in BNCT with the availability of new accelerator-based neutrons sources and novel synthesis of boron-10 target drugs, allowing clinical research to expand with the goal to have BNCT available as a new treatment option for patients.

The secondary radiation reaction from BNCT, with cellular-level precision, spares more healthy tissues and can potentially treat cancers that otherwise have few treatment options.

The system requires a neutron accelerator, but this is smaller than a proton system and operates at much lower energy, so the shielding requirement is much lower, cutting construction costs.

Find more news and video on radiation therapy

 

Contrast Media Injectors | May 22, 2020

At this year’s RSNA ITN sat down with Dennis Durmis, Senior Vice President, Bayer Radiology to discuss Radiology trends. Discussion topics centered around three key areas where Bayer Radiology is responding to trends; including digitalization, workflow efficiencies and efforts to bring more focus to the Radiology patient experience. During the interview Dennis discussed Bayer’s digital strategy, features and benefits of their new injector, the MEDRAD® Stellant FLEX Injector and Bayer’s education efforts of the imaging needs of women with Dense Breast.

Artificial Intelligence | February 21, 2020

In Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2019, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting.

Proton Therapy | December 16, 2019

Join Chris Toth, president of Varian’s Oncology Systems business, for a peek at the history of machine learning/AI in radiation oncology, plus other highlights in 2019:

  • Ethos therapy: the world’s first AI-powered adaptive radiotherapy.
  • Noona cloud-based application for capturing patient-reported outcomes.
  • Varian’s multi-room configuration for ProBeam 360 proton therapy.
  • The promise of FLASH, an ultra-high-speed treatment that is in pre-clinical testing, and represents an exciting and potentially promising new direction in the treatment of cancer. 
Quality Assurance (QA) | December 06, 2019

Modus QA is proud to offer a superior phantom for quantifying geometric distortion in modern MRgRT applications. Watch this video to discover how the entire QA process including set-up and data analysis can be completed in under 10 minutes.

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Radiation Oncology | October 11, 2019

Lorraine Drapek, DNP, nurse practitioner, radiation oncology, GI service, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the roles of advanced practice providers in radiation therapy. She spoke on this topic at ASTRO 2019 at a session that reviewed the integration of APPs into radiation oncology practice to enhance clinical care. This includes but is not limited to: on-treatment management, symptom and acute toxicity management during treatment, inpatient consultations, procedural assistance, treatment planning, follow-up, survivorship and research.

Radiation Therapy | October 08, 2019

Kristin Higgins, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology, Emory Clinic at the Winship Cancer Institute, explains considerations when treating previous radiation oncology patients again at the same or other tumor sites. She spoke on this topic at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2019 annual meeting in Chicago.

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Prostate Cancer | September 30, 2019

Bill Hartsell, M.D., medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Proton Center in Warrenville, Ill., discusses the outcomes of a trial investigating the use of a hydrogel spacer to hold the rectum away from the prostate during radiation therapy treatments. The trial was presented at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting. 

Read the article "Augmenix Announces Positive Three-Year Long-Term Data for SpaceOAR Hydrogel Spacer"

Read the article "Latest Advances in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy"

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Radiation Therapy | September 27, 2019

Candice Johnstone, M.D., MPH, Medical College of Wisconsin explains the need for palliative radiotherapy and patient selection considerations at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2019 annual meeting. 

Despite improvements in the survival of some populations of cancer patients, some patients are not candidates for ablative therapy and need symptom relief. Cases will be used to highlight evidenced based approaches to palliative radiation therapy. A significant proportion of patients do not benefit from immunotherapy and need standard palliative radiation. The best palliative radiation utilizes the fewest number of fractions to achieve the desired effect, minimizes side effects of treatment and treatment related costs.

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Radiation Therapy | September 26, 2019

Clifford Robinson, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology, chief of the SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) service, director of clinical trials, Washington University, St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, explains the longer term results of cardiac radiotherapy ablation to treat ventricular tachycardia. 

The results of the ENCORE-VT study were presented at ASTRO 2019.

Read the article "Noninvasive Radioablation Offers Long-term Benefits to High-risk Heart Arrhythmia Patients"

More coverage of ASTRO 2019

Radiation Oncology | September 20, 2019

Anne Hubbard, MBA, director of health policy for ASTRO, explains the details and purpose of the proposed Radiation Oncology Alternative Payment Model (RO Model) at the ASTRO 2019 meeting.

In July 2019, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) issued a proposed rule establishing the RO Model. It requires participation from about 40 percent of radiation oncology practices in a model that dramatically changes the way Medicare pays for radiation therapy services. The RO Model is designed to test whether prospective episode-based payments to physician group practices (PGPs), hospital outpatient departments (HOPDs) and freestanding radiation therapy centers for episodes of care would reduce Medicare expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries. CMMI proposes launching the model as early as Jan. 1, 2020.

Related Content

CMS Proposes New Alternative Payment Model for Radiation Oncology

ASTRO Releases Comments on Proposed CMS Radiation Oncology Alternative Payment Model

Additional ASTRO 2019 coverage

 

Radiation Therapy | September 20, 2019

ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Vinai Gondi, M.D., co-director of the Brain Tumor Center at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the long-term results of a radiation therapy technique called hippocampal avoidance to preserve neurocognitive function for cancer patients with brain metastases at the 2019 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) annual meeting.

Watch the VIDEO: Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and the VIDEO: Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors, a previous two-part interview with Gondi.

Read the article "Hippocampal Avoidance Using IMRT Now Recommended as Standard of Care for Brain Metastases"

Quality Assurance (QA) | September 04, 2019

Modus QA is proud to offer the world's first MR-safe Motion QA phantom for simulation, planning and delivery applications. Watch the video to see how the integrated design saves setup time and increases operational efficiency.

View the video here: 

Proton Therapy | August 21, 2019

A new area for proton therapy in treatment of eye cancer, because of the ability to control the tissue penetration and eliminate full beam lines through a multitude of critical structures in the head. RaySearch unveiled a new treatment planning software for the eye at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. The vendor showed some of the first patient cases coming out of the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen (WPE) proton center in Germany. RaySearch said several U.S. proton centers had interest in the technology at the conference.

Find more news and video from AAPM

 

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and auto-contours them as the first step in creating radiation oncology treatment plans. This example of a segmented prostate computed tomography (CT) scan being used to plan radiotherapy was created without any human intervention. It was demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. 

This example shows OAR Space hydrogel (outlined in blue) injected to create space between the prostate and the rectum to prevent damage to that radiation sensitive structure. The gel is hard to identify on the CT scan because it looks like part of the rectum or prostate. But the softwares AI has been trained to identify it when present.

The DLCExpert software was cleared by the FDA in July 2018 and was first shown at ASTRO 2018. It automatically identifies anatomical structures and contours them to save staff time. The files created by the software are vendor neutral and can be imported into any vendor’s treatment planning system. Read more about this software. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 21, 2019

This is a quick demonstration of the Varian Identify image-guided patient positioning system at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. It helps align patients on the radiotherapy system treatment table to match the position they were in when the computed tomography (CT) scan was created. This ensures the radiation beams are delivered according to the treatment plan and will not be aimed accidentally at health tissue. It uses real-time tracking of the surface of the patient's skin using three visible light emitters, so it does not add dose, such as when on-board X-ray imaging is used. The system compares the patients position to the treatment plan CT scan and color codes in red any areas that are not in the proper position. It also uses RFID tags on the table to help know the exact position of the patient.

The system can show the radiotherapist if the patient is no longer aligned with the plan and the therapist can manually stop the therapy. The vendor said in the future, they plan to integrate the system with Varian's therapy systems so treatment will be stopped automatically by the Identify system. 

The system also uses a biometric scanner to ensure the correct plan is being used with the correct patient. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019

This is a lung cancer tumor radiotherapy treatment plan for the Accuray CyberKnife system demonstrated at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. The blue lines are the radiation beam lines that are shot from different positions to all intersect in the tumor to deliver the prescribed amount of radiation and prevent damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The beams also are planned around the critical structure organs near the target tumor to limit their dose. The organs are color coded to differentiate them on the treatment plan and to help with the estimated radiation dose each receives based on the plan. After the plan is optimized, it is fed into the radiotherapy treatment system computer to deliver the treatment once the patient is positioned on the treatment table exactly as they are in the CT scans used to create the plan. 

Find more news and video from AAPM

 

 

Computed Tomography (CT) | August 21, 2019

This is a quick walk around of a mobile 32-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner used for surgery, brachytherapy and proton therapy on display by Mobius Imaging at the 2019 American Association Of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) meeting. The system simply plugs into a standard wall outlet and all of the required hardware and software is built into the gantry. There is no need for an equipment closet, cabinet or server tower. The company said the CT system was created by some of the same developers who built the O-arm mobile CT system, but they said this CT scanner is much more compact.

 

Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019

Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.

Find more SCCT news and videos

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