News | Radiation Oncology | July 17, 2019

CMS Proposes New Alternative Payment Model for Radiation Oncology

ASTRO issues statement emphasizing need for radiation oncologists to participate in value-based cancer care

CMS Proposes New Alternative Payment Model for Radiation Oncology

July 17, 2019 — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposal for an advanced alternative payment model (APM) for radiation oncology on July 10, 2019. In response, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) issued the following statement from Paul Harari, M.D., FASTRO, chair of the ASTRO Board of Directors:

“The Radiation Oncology (RO) Model announced today by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) is a step forward in allowing the nation’s 4,500 radiation oncologists to participate in the transition to value-based care that improves outcomes for cancer patients. We believe that once implemented with modifications, the model will incentivize higher quality, more convenient radiation treatments for patients and support their journey toward a cure,” Harari said.

“We look forward to providing comments on the specifics of the model, including requirements for certain radiation oncology groups to participate. In our comments to CMS, ASTRO will prioritize recommendations that achieve our longstanding payment reform goals, including stable and fair payments accompanied by incentives for higher quality care and lower costs. In addition, ASTRO will look closely for opportunities to ensure the model is consistent with the administration’s initiative to reduce physician burden and paperwork,” he continued.

“ASTRO has worked for many years to craft a viable payment model that would stabilize payments, drive adherence to nationally-recognized clinical guidelines and improve patient care. We appreciate the Administration’s focus and commitment to ensuring radiation oncologists' ability to participate in an advanced APM,” Harari concluded. 

Read the full proposed alternative payment model from CMS.

For more information: www.astro.org

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