Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 20, 2019

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac MRI Technology

James Carr, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, and incoming 2020 President of the Society of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (SCMR), explains why MRI is an ideal cardiac imaging modality, at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

Heart MRI offers advantages over computed tomography (CT) and echocardiography because of its excellent soft tissue delineation and its ability to offer information beyond anatomical imaging, such as perfusion, morphology and metabolism. MRI can be technically challenging and the exams requiring a long time, but recent advances have helped cur cardiac imaging times down significantly. Automation and artificial intelligence (AI) also is making post-processing and quantification mush faster, brining it closer to the time it takes to scan and post-process CT imaging.
 
Northwestern is was one of the early adopters of cardiovascular MRI. Carr said heart MRI was not common in regular clinical use until the past decade at some luminary centers. In 2005, Carr was given the opportunity to develop a clinical cardiac MRI program at Northwestern.
 
He said MRI scanners have improved, and now much faster than a decade ago. They are also more optimized for cardiac imaging. While heart MRI is well known in large hospital centers, Carr said it still needs to develop and expand to community hospitals and rural hospitals outside major population centers. 

Artificial intelligence is playing a significant role in cardiac MRI automation of speeding workflow and quantification. Carr said these technologies will become mainstream in the next few years. AI also will play an increasing role in risk prediction based on new image analysis algorithms in development.

For more information on cardiac MRI, visit SCMR's website www.heartmri.org.

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Mammography | January 24, 2020

Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed Henry Izawa, vice president of modality solutions, Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. about Fujifilm's latest innovations in mammography.

In this video, Izawa announces the latest imaging advancements available for the Aspire Cristalle digital mammography system with digital breast tomosynthesis, including S-View, a synthesized 2-D image reconstructed from DBT and other patient enhancements such as the comfort paddle to provide a noticeably more comfortable exam for the patient.

Watch the video to hear all about Fujifilm's updates.

To learn more, visit www.fujimed.com

Enterprise Imaging | January 20, 2020

GE Healthcare's iCenter is a cloud-based management software that provides 24/7 visibility to customers' visual and operational data. In this Conversations video, Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr discusses iCenter with GE and Microsoft Executives at RSNA 2019.

RSNA | January 13, 2020

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

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RSNA | January 07, 2020

Elizabeth M. Hecht, M.D., professor of radiology, Columbia University, New York, explains the latest advances to help visualize the difficult to image pancreas. She was a moderator of a session on pancreatic imaging advances at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

She explained computed tomography is the front line imaging modality, followed by MRI for more detailed examination of the soft tissue details. MRI tissue elastography can also help to differentiate pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Hecht also said PET-CT and endoscopic ultrasound also play roles in pancreatic imaging. She said new software is helping automate measurements and artificial intelligence (AI) is in development to help improve pancreatic imaging and to find new radiomic markers that might be missed by the human eye to better detect disease or risk stratify patients.

Find more news and video from RSNA

 

 

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Mammography | January 24, 2020

Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed Henry Izawa, vice president of modality solutions, Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. about Fujifilm's latest innovations in mammography.

In this video, Izawa announces the latest imaging advancements available for the Aspire Cristalle digital mammography system with digital breast tomosynthesis, including S-View, a synthesized 2-D image reconstructed from DBT and other patient enhancements such as the comfort paddle to provide a noticeably more comfortable exam for the patient.

Watch the video to hear all about Fujifilm's updates.

To learn more, visit www.fujimed.com

Enterprise Imaging | January 20, 2020

GE Healthcare's iCenter is a cloud-based management software that provides 24/7 visibility to customers' visual and operational data. In this Conversations video, Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr discusses iCenter with GE and Microsoft Executives at RSNA 2019.

Digital Radiography (DR) | January 06, 2020

An experienced technologist and two Agfa executives talk about what distinguishes the new Agfa 100s. Three key highlights include the quality of images that users can get out of the system for the certainty of the diagnostic; more flexibility that has been designed around the user; and its revolutionary platform.

Ultrasound Imaging | January 06, 2020

The Arietta 850SE provides facilities with numerous features and functionality to get the most out of a system. The CMUT probe performs the role of multiple probes while the single-crystal C252 probe gets increased penetration. eFocusing simplifies scanning techniques and shearwave elastography provides unique feedback on tissue stiffness.

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Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018

Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.

For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:

Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray Philosophy

ASTRO Puts Patients First

Technology Reports | April 01, 2018

ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:

Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For Radiology

Value in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of Radiology

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Mammography | January 24, 2020

Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed Henry Izawa, vice president of modality solutions, Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. about Fujifilm's latest innovations in mammography.

In this video, Izawa announces the latest imaging advancements available for the Aspire Cristalle digital mammography system with digital breast tomosynthesis, including S-View, a synthesized 2-D image reconstructed from DBT and other patient enhancements such as the comfort paddle to provide a noticeably more comfortable exam for the patient.

Watch the video to hear all about Fujifilm's updates.

To learn more, visit www.fujimed.com

Enterprise Imaging | January 20, 2020

GE Healthcare's iCenter is a cloud-based management software that provides 24/7 visibility to customers' visual and operational data. In this Conversations video, Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr discusses iCenter with GE and Microsoft Executives at RSNA 2019.

RSNA | January 13, 2020

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

Find more videos and news from RSNA 2019

 

RSNA | January 07, 2020

Elizabeth M. Hecht, M.D., professor of radiology, Columbia University, New York, explains the latest advances to help visualize the difficult to image pancreas. She was a moderator of a session on pancreatic imaging advances at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

She explained computed tomography is the front line imaging modality, followed by MRI for more detailed examination of the soft tissue details. MRI tissue elastography can also help to differentiate pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Hecht also said PET-CT and endoscopic ultrasound also play roles in pancreatic imaging. She said new software is helping automate measurements and artificial intelligence (AI) is in development to help improve pancreatic imaging and to find new radiomic markers that might be missed by the human eye to better detect disease or risk stratify patients.

Find more news and video from RSNA

 

 

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Proton Therapy | December 16, 2019

Join Chris Toth, president of Varian’s Oncology Systems business, for a peek at the history of machine learning/AI in radiation oncology, plus other highlights in 2019:

  • Ethos therapy: the world’s first AI-powered adaptive radiotherapy.
  • Noona cloud-based application for capturing patient-reported outcomes.
  • Varian’s multi-room configuration for ProBeam 360 proton therapy.
  • The promise of FLASH, an ultra-high-speed treatment that is in pre-clinical testing, and represents an exciting and potentially promising new direction in the treatment of cancer. 
Quality Assurance (QA) | December 06, 2019

Modus QA is proud to offer a superior phantom for quantifying geometric distortion in modern MRgRT applications. Watch this video to discover how the entire QA process including set-up and data analysis can be completed in under 10 minutes.

Artificial Intelligence | October 22, 2019

David Sjostrom, Ph.D., deputy chief physicist, Herlev Hospital, Department of Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Herlev, Denmark, shares the first clinical experience treating cancer patients with the Varian Ethos radiation therapy system. He spoke to ITN at ASTRO 2019, where he presented information on the first 5 patients in the world being treated with this new technology. It uses artificial intelligence to take the onboard cone beam CT scans to automatically create an adaptive plan for any changes in patient weight loss, bladder volume, or change in tumor size. The plan can be available in minutes while the patient is on the table. It enables sparing of more healthy tissue and makes adaptive therapy much easier to use. 

 

Radiation Oncology | October 11, 2019

Lorraine Drapek, DNP, nurse practitioner, radiation oncology, GI service, Massachusetts General Hospital, explains the roles of advanced practice providers in radiation therapy. She spoke on this topic at ASTRO 2019 at a session that reviewed the integration of APPs into radiation oncology practice to enhance clinical care. This includes but is not limited to: on-treatment management, symptom and acute toxicity management during treatment, inpatient consultations, procedural assistance, treatment planning, follow-up, survivorship and research.

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Mammography | January 24, 2020

Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed Henry Izawa, vice president of modality solutions, Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. about Fujifilm's latest innovations in mammography.

In this video, Izawa announces the latest imaging advancements available for the Aspire Cristalle digital mammography system with digital breast tomosynthesis, including S-View, a synthesized 2-D image reconstructed from DBT and other patient enhancements such as the comfort paddle to provide a noticeably more comfortable exam for the patient.

Watch the video to hear all about Fujifilm's updates.

To learn more, visit www.fujimed.com

RSNA | January 13, 2020

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

Find more videos and news from RSNA 2019

 

RSNA | January 07, 2020

Elizabeth M. Hecht, M.D., professor of radiology, Columbia University, New York, explains the latest advances to help visualize the difficult to image pancreas. She was a moderator of a session on pancreatic imaging advances at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

She explained computed tomography is the front line imaging modality, followed by MRI for more detailed examination of the soft tissue details. MRI tissue elastography can also help to differentiate pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Hecht also said PET-CT and endoscopic ultrasound also play roles in pancreatic imaging. She said new software is helping automate measurements and artificial intelligence (AI) is in development to help improve pancreatic imaging and to find new radiomic markers that might be missed by the human eye to better detect disease or risk stratify patients.

Find more news and video from RSNA

 

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 06, 2020

Karen Ordovas, M.D., MAS, professor of radiology and cardiology at the University of California San Francisco (UCFS) School of Medicine and a Society of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) board member, explains how cardiac MRI can help in women's heart disease and to better define complex congenital heart anatomy. She spoke at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

She specializes in cardiac and pulmonary imaging, and has particular expertise in using CT and MRI techniques in cardiovascular imaging and the differences of presentation in imaging between male and female cardiac patients. Ordovas is helping advance education around heart disease in women and bring great awareness of quality tools to diagnose heart disease and how heart MRI can help. She also is heavily involved in the use of heart MRIs for pregnant women, since there is no radiation,  and patients with congenital heart disease where detailed imaging of the complex anatomy is required.

The use of cardiac MRI in congenital heart disease is common in serial imaging of patients with Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), one of the most common congenital heart diseases for which patients are referred for post-operative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging evaluation. In the past few decades, surgery has proved successful, but most patients require repeat imaging throughout their lives and MRI can offer more detailed soft tissue imaging without the use of radiation. 

 

Related Cardiac MRI Content:

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac MRI Technology — Interview with James Carr, M.D.

Cardiac MRI Delivers Accurate Diagnosis for Frontline Chest Pain Evaluation

VIDEO: Dedicated Cardiac MRI Use at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital

Advantages and New Applications of Cardiac MRI

Will Cardiac MRI Expand?

 

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Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019

Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting

 

Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis

New PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition

25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology Articles

Recent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology

SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018

This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It's CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.

Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” 

Read the article "Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition."

Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018

Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.

Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital

 

Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:

Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

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Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017

Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article "Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging."

 

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Enterprise Imaging | January 20, 2020

GE Healthcare's iCenter is a cloud-based management software that provides 24/7 visibility to customers' visual and operational data. In this Conversations video, Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr discusses iCenter with GE and Microsoft Executives at RSNA 2019.

RSNA | January 13, 2020

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

Find more videos and news from RSNA 2019

 

Stroke | January 03, 2020

Ajay Choudhri, M.D., chairman of radiology, Capital Health, Hopewell, N.J., explains his center's experience using an artificial intelligence (AI) application to help auto detect intracranial hemorrhage. There are several AI stroke auto detection apps now available with FDA clearance or in development that were shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. These are being adopted by hospitals and multi-center radiology practices the U.S. to flag suspected cases of ischemic stroke or brain bleeds for immediate reads. 

MaxQ AI Accipio hemorrhagic stroke detection software. MaxQ.AIThe software also offers a second set of eyes for more difficult to detect cases. Quickly determining is a stroke is ischemic or hemorrhagic is critical to the path of treatment. If caught early enough, TPA can be injected into patients to clear clots causing an ischemic stroke, but can cause massive brain damage or death if injected into a patient with a brain bleed. At advanced neuro-interventional centers, quickly determining the type of stroke is needed to know if they need to revascularize a patient or manage a hemorrhage. 

 

Related Content:

How Artificial Intelligence Can Predict and Detect Stroke

MaxQ AI's Intracranial Hemorrhage Software to be Integrated on Philips CT Systems

Find more news and video from RSNA

Advanced Visualization | December 30, 2019

This is a hologram of a fracture from a computed tomography (CT) scan displayed by the start up company Voxon at the 2019 Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) meeting. The technology uses a half millimeter thick glass plate that pulses up and down very rapidly while projecting 4,000 images per second. It can display standard DICOM radiology files or STL files used for 3-D printing.

There were at least four vendors showing holographic screens to display advanced visualization 3-D renderings of anatomy from medical imaging. All four of these screens could be viewed in true 3-D using normal vision without the need for special glasses or a virtual reality visor.

The images in this example flickers because of the different frame rates of the system and the iPhone used to film it, but the actual images appears much more stable.

This technology was also included in the VIDEO: Editors Choice of the Most Innovative New Radiology Technology at RSNA 2019

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

Find more news and video from RSNA

 

Women's Health View all 67 items

Mammography | January 24, 2020

Imaging Technology News Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr interviewed Henry Izawa, vice president of modality solutions, Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. about Fujifilm's latest innovations in mammography.

In this video, Izawa announces the latest imaging advancements available for the Aspire Cristalle digital mammography system with digital breast tomosynthesis, including S-View, a synthesized 2-D image reconstructed from DBT and other patient enhancements such as the comfort paddle to provide a noticeably more comfortable exam for the patient.

Watch the video to hear all about Fujifilm's updates.

To learn more, visit www.fujimed.com

RSNA | January 13, 2020

ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 meeting. 

Technology examples include a robotic arm to perform remote ultrasound exams, integration of artificial intelligence (AI) to speed or automate radiology workflow, holographic medical imaging display screens, a new glassless digital radiography (DR) X-ray detector, augmented reality for transesophageal echo (TEE) training, moving DR X-ray images, 3-D printed surgical implants created from a patient's CT imaging, DR X-ray tomosynthesis datasets, radiation dose management and analytics software, and new computed tomography (CT) technologies.

Photo Gallery of New Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2019

Find more videos and news from RSNA 2019

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 06, 2020

Karen Ordovas, M.D., MAS, professor of radiology and cardiology at the University of California San Francisco (UCFS) School of Medicine and a Society of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) board member, explains how cardiac MRI can help in women's heart disease and to better define complex congenital heart anatomy. She spoke at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. 

She specializes in cardiac and pulmonary imaging, and has particular expertise in using CT and MRI techniques in cardiovascular imaging and the differences of presentation in imaging between male and female cardiac patients. Ordovas is helping advance education around heart disease in women and bring great awareness of quality tools to diagnose heart disease and how heart MRI can help. She also is heavily involved in the use of heart MRIs for pregnant women, since there is no radiation,  and patients with congenital heart disease where detailed imaging of the complex anatomy is required.

The use of cardiac MRI in congenital heart disease is common in serial imaging of patients with Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), one of the most common congenital heart diseases for which patients are referred for post-operative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging evaluation. In the past few decades, surgery has proved successful, but most patients require repeat imaging throughout their lives and MRI can offer more detailed soft tissue imaging without the use of radiation. 

 

Related Cardiac MRI Content:

VIDEO: Advances in Cardiac MRI Technology — Interview with James Carr, M.D.

Cardiac MRI Delivers Accurate Diagnosis for Frontline Chest Pain Evaluation

VIDEO: Dedicated Cardiac MRI Use at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital

Advantages and New Applications of Cardiac MRI

Will Cardiac MRI Expand?

 

Digital Radiography (DR) | January 03, 2020

At RSNA19, David Widmann, president and CEO of Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas, discussed innovation, stressing the importance of academic relationships.