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Recent Videos View all 569 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 26, 2020

GE Healthcare is highlighting artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging, 

The new SonoLyst AI software can auto recognize 20 standard fetal views in the second trimester protocol. The goal is to speed exam times and make the exams more accurate, even for less experienced monographers. The AI can tell users what any image is when they freeze the frame. This can be used to help cue up measurements and appropriate annotations. The AI also can tell th user if all the required anatomical structures are in an image needed for the exam protocols.
 

Find more RSNA news and video

MRI Breast | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to clearly identify breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue. In women with dense breasts, it can be very difficult to detect many cancers on standard mammograms because the cancers and dense tissue both appear white. MRI can help clearly define tumors and identify which nodules are cancer and which are benign, which can help greatly reduce the need for biopsies.

Kuhl is an expert in breast imaging and breast MRI. She helped develop an a shortened MRI protocol that allows breast MR images to be created in 3 minutes or less, rather than standard protocols that can take up to 30 minutes. In the interview she shows patient case examples of standard mammograms and the MRI supplemental imaging for the same patient to show the hidden tumors. 

She also explains the differences between standard 2-d mammography, the current standard of care, and the newer 3-D mammogram tomosythnesis technology, breast ultrasound and breast MRI technologies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Breast MRI Content:

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts — Interview with Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

Rapid Breast MRI Screening Improves Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts

Breast MRI in Cancer Diagnosis
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has impacted screening mammography and raised fears there will be a large increase in more advanced breast cancer cases in the near future as sizable numbers of women skip their annual exams this year. Kuhl also explains the COVID safety protocols most breast imaging centers are taking to limit any potential exposure to the virus from asymptomatic patients.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

 

How COVID Has Disrupted Screening Mammography and The Urgency to Resume Screenings:

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Half of Breast Cancer Survivors Had Delays in Care Due to COVID-19

Insight on the Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Imaging

Delay in Breast Cancer Operations Appears Non Life-threatening for Early-stage Disease

Hologic and Sheryl Crow Begin Back to Screening Campaign

A Slow Return to Normalcy in Breast Imaging

Breast Density | October 13, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains what it means to have dense breasts and how density can hide cancers in mammograms. She offers an explanation describing dense breast tissue and that this occurs in about half of women. Density is itself a risk factor for breast cancer and the fact that dense tissue hides cancers on mammography means that supplemental imaging is needed to accurately diagnose these patients and avoid false positives, or needless tissue biopsies. Breast ultrasound and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to see through dense tissue to better identify cancers and avoid the need for many biopsies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Dense Breast Content:

Breast Density Explained

Animation to Bring Clarity to Dense Breasts

Improving Clinical Image Quality for Breast Imaging

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

 

Sponsored Videos View all 159 items

PACS | June 29, 2020

Kevin Borden, Vice President of Product, Healthcare IT for Konica Minolta, talks about Improving Access and Aiding Workflow with itnTV. He explains how the server-side rendering and zero-footprint viewer in its Exa PACS make it well-suited for remote reading.

Contrast Media Injectors | May 22, 2020

At this year’s RSNA ITN sat down with Dennis Durmis, Senior Vice President, Bayer Radiology to discuss Radiology trends. Discussion topics centered around three key areas where Bayer Radiology is responding to trends; including digitalization, workflow efficiencies and efforts to bring more focus to the Radiology patient experience. During the interview Dennis discussed Bayer’s digital strategy, features and benefits of their new injector, the MEDRAD® Stellant FLEX Injector and Bayer’s education efforts of the imaging needs of women with Dense Breast.

Enterprise Imaging | March 02, 2020

At RSNA19, Philips discussed with ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr how its IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition fits into the Philips portfolio, and how the corporate acquisition of Carestream Health IT might affect the company. The video also discusses how Philips will help prospective customers acquire its products.

Artificial Intelligence | February 21, 2020

In Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2019, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting.

Technology Reports View all 11 items

Artificial Intelligence | February 21, 2020

In Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2019, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting.

Enterprise Imaging | February 21, 2020

In Enterprise Imaging at RSNA 2019, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting.

Conference Coverage View all 460 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 26, 2020

GE Healthcare is highlighting artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging, 

The new SonoLyst AI software can auto recognize 20 standard fetal views in the second trimester protocol. The goal is to speed exam times and make the exams more accurate, even for less experienced monographers. The AI can tell users what any image is when they freeze the frame. This can be used to help cue up measurements and appropriate annotations. The AI also can tell th user if all the required anatomical structures are in an image needed for the exam protocols.
 

Find more RSNA news and video

MRI Breast | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to clearly identify breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue. In women with dense breasts, it can be very difficult to detect many cancers on standard mammograms because the cancers and dense tissue both appear white. MRI can help clearly define tumors and identify which nodules are cancer and which are benign, which can help greatly reduce the need for biopsies.

Kuhl is an expert in breast imaging and breast MRI. She helped develop an a shortened MRI protocol that allows breast MR images to be created in 3 minutes or less, rather than standard protocols that can take up to 30 minutes. In the interview she shows patient case examples of standard mammograms and the MRI supplemental imaging for the same patient to show the hidden tumors. 

She also explains the differences between standard 2-d mammography, the current standard of care, and the newer 3-D mammogram tomosythnesis technology, breast ultrasound and breast MRI technologies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Breast MRI Content:

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts — Interview with Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

Rapid Breast MRI Screening Improves Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts

Breast MRI in Cancer Diagnosis
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has impacted screening mammography and raised fears there will be a large increase in more advanced breast cancer cases in the near future as sizable numbers of women skip their annual exams this year. Kuhl also explains the COVID safety protocols most breast imaging centers are taking to limit any potential exposure to the virus from asymptomatic patients.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

 

How COVID Has Disrupted Screening Mammography and The Urgency to Resume Screenings:

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Half of Breast Cancer Survivors Had Delays in Care Due to COVID-19

Insight on the Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Imaging

Delay in Breast Cancer Operations Appears Non Life-threatening for Early-stage Disease

Hologic and Sheryl Crow Begin Back to Screening Campaign

A Slow Return to Normalcy in Breast Imaging

Breast Density | October 13, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains what it means to have dense breasts and how density can hide cancers in mammograms. She offers an explanation describing dense breast tissue and that this occurs in about half of women. Density is itself a risk factor for breast cancer and the fact that dense tissue hides cancers on mammography means that supplemental imaging is needed to accurately diagnose these patients and avoid false positives, or needless tissue biopsies. Breast ultrasound and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to see through dense tissue to better identify cancers and avoid the need for many biopsies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Dense Breast Content:

Breast Density Explained

Animation to Bring Clarity to Dense Breasts

Improving Clinical Image Quality for Breast Imaging

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

 

Radiation Oncology View all 114 items

Contrast Media Injectors | May 22, 2020

At this year’s RSNA ITN sat down with Dennis Durmis, Senior Vice President, Bayer Radiology to discuss Radiology trends. Discussion topics centered around three key areas where Bayer Radiology is responding to trends; including digitalization, workflow efficiencies and efforts to bring more focus to the Radiology patient experience. During the interview Dennis discussed Bayer’s digital strategy, features and benefits of their new injector, the MEDRAD® Stellant FLEX Injector and Bayer’s education efforts of the imaging needs of women with Dense Breast.

Artificial Intelligence | February 21, 2020

In Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2019, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2019 annual meeting.

Proton Therapy | December 16, 2019

Join Chris Toth, president of Varian’s Oncology Systems business, for a peek at the history of machine learning/AI in radiation oncology, plus other highlights in 2019:

  • Ethos therapy: the world’s first AI-powered adaptive radiotherapy.
  • Noona cloud-based application for capturing patient-reported outcomes.
  • Varian’s multi-room configuration for ProBeam 360 proton therapy.
  • The promise of FLASH, an ultra-high-speed treatment that is in pre-clinical testing, and represents an exciting and potentially promising new direction in the treatment of cancer. 
Quality Assurance (QA) | December 06, 2019

Modus QA is proud to offer a superior phantom for quantifying geometric distortion in modern MRgRT applications. Watch this video to discover how the entire QA process including set-up and data analysis can be completed in under 10 minutes.

Radiology Imaging View all 345 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 26, 2020

GE Healthcare is highlighting artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging, 

The new SonoLyst AI software can auto recognize 20 standard fetal views in the second trimester protocol. The goal is to speed exam times and make the exams more accurate, even for less experienced monographers. The AI can tell users what any image is when they freeze the frame. This can be used to help cue up measurements and appropriate annotations. The AI also can tell th user if all the required anatomical structures are in an image needed for the exam protocols.
 

Find more RSNA news and video

MRI Breast | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to clearly identify breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue. In women with dense breasts, it can be very difficult to detect many cancers on standard mammograms because the cancers and dense tissue both appear white. MRI can help clearly define tumors and identify which nodules are cancer and which are benign, which can help greatly reduce the need for biopsies.

Kuhl is an expert in breast imaging and breast MRI. She helped develop an a shortened MRI protocol that allows breast MR images to be created in 3 minutes or less, rather than standard protocols that can take up to 30 minutes. In the interview she shows patient case examples of standard mammograms and the MRI supplemental imaging for the same patient to show the hidden tumors. 

She also explains the differences between standard 2-d mammography, the current standard of care, and the newer 3-D mammogram tomosythnesis technology, breast ultrasound and breast MRI technologies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Breast MRI Content:

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts — Interview with Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

Rapid Breast MRI Screening Improves Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts

Breast MRI in Cancer Diagnosis
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has impacted screening mammography and raised fears there will be a large increase in more advanced breast cancer cases in the near future as sizable numbers of women skip their annual exams this year. Kuhl also explains the COVID safety protocols most breast imaging centers are taking to limit any potential exposure to the virus from asymptomatic patients.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

 

How COVID Has Disrupted Screening Mammography and The Urgency to Resume Screenings:

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Half of Breast Cancer Survivors Had Delays in Care Due to COVID-19

Insight on the Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Imaging

Delay in Breast Cancer Operations Appears Non Life-threatening for Early-stage Disease

Hologic and Sheryl Crow Begin Back to Screening Campaign

A Slow Return to Normalcy in Breast Imaging

Breast Density | October 13, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains what it means to have dense breasts and how density can hide cancers in mammograms. She offers an explanation describing dense breast tissue and that this occurs in about half of women. Density is itself a risk factor for breast cancer and the fact that dense tissue hides cancers on mammography means that supplemental imaging is needed to accurately diagnose these patients and avoid false positives, or needless tissue biopsies. Breast ultrasound and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to see through dense tissue to better identify cancers and avoid the need for many biopsies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Dense Breast Content:

Breast Density Explained

Animation to Bring Clarity to Dense Breasts

Improving Clinical Image Quality for Breast Imaging

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

 

Molecular Imaging View all 28 items

Artificial Intelligence | September 25, 2020

Ernest Garcia, Ph.D., MASNC, FAHA, endowed professor in cardiac imaging, director of nuclear cardiology R&D laboratory, Emory University, developer of the Emory Cardiac Tool Box used in nuclear imaging and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cardiac imaging. He said there is a tsunami of new AI applications that are starting to flood the FDA for market approval, and there are several examples of AI already in use in radiology. He spoke on this topic in a keynote session at the 2020 ASNC meeting.

 

Related Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Machine Learning for Diagnosis and Risk Prediction in Nuclear Cardiology — Interview with Piotr J. Slomka, Ph.D.,

Artificial Intelligence Applications in Cardiology

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions — Interview with Nick West, M.D., Abbott CMO

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence for Echocardiography at Mass General — Interview with Judy Hung, M.D.

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

For more AI in cardiology content

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 18, 2020

Stephen Bloom, M.D., FASNC, director of noninvasive cardiology (cardiac CT, nuclear cardiology and echocardiography) at Midwest Heart and Vascular Associates, Overland Park, Kansas. He is also a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, explains some of the issues involved and protocols used for cardiac imaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. His discussion includes computed tomography, cardiac ultrasound and nuclear imaging.

Right now, Bloom said it is difficult to test everybody and there is a shortage of masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment (PPE), and the imaging equipment needs to be sanitized each time it is used. He said it is just is not possible to image all the patients who need imaging right now. Hospitals also are trying to limit the number of healthy people people coming into hospitals for routine visits and tests to reduce their potential exposure to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) and help containment efforts. 

"The tests should be done, very simply, if it changes the care of the patient. If it doesn't change the care of the patient, and it can be postponed, it should be postponed," Bloom explained. "I would say 80 percent of our cardiac imaging exams have stopped. It has been very dramatic."

 

Related Imaging Precautions During COVID-19 Content:

Cardiac Imaging Best Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories During the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic

ASE Guidelines for the Protection of Echocardiography Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak 

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D. 

VIDEO: 9 Cardiologists Share COVID-19 Takeaways From Across the U.S.  

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with radiologist John Kim, M.D.

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 04, 2020

Hicham Skali, M.D., a staff cardiologist and member of the Non-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and at Brigham and Women’s / Massachusetts General Health Care Center at Foxborough, explains the new recommendations from the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) and from imagers in China and Singapore. The ASNC created a best practices document for nuclear cardiology laboratories during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. The suggestions in the guidelines can ally to any imaging modality, including computed tomography (CT), MRI and ultrasound. 

Skali elaborates on the following points in his discussion, which are specific recommendations in the ASNC and SNMMI COVID-19 guidance document:
   • Rescheduling non-urgent visits
   • Rescheduling elective surgeries and procedures
   • Using separate spaces for patients with known or suspected COVID-19 to prevent spread
   • Ensuring supplies are available
   • Promoting use of telehealth
   • Screen staff, patients and visitors before they enter the department
   • Minimize non-essential visitors into the department
   • Record symptoms at the start of the shift
   • Use personal protective equipment (PPE)for healthcare personnel
   • If available, use PPE for patients due to concern of asymptomatic transmission of COVID-19
   • Maintain strict hand hygiene
   • Maintain 6 feet distance in all patient/staff interactions when possible
   • Work remotely whenever feasible, especially with ready studies
   • Rotating staff schedules for on-site and off-site work
   • Use of rest only studies if possible
   • Use of half-time SPECT to speed exam times
   • Use of PET if available to speed exam times

Skali served as the moderator in for the ASNC on demand webinar COVID-19 Preparedness for Nuclear Cardiology Labs: Insights from the US, China and Singapore.

VIDEO: Telemedicine in Cardiology and Medical Imaging During COVID-19 — Interview with Regina Druz, M.D., an ASNC Board member and also a speaker during the ASNC webinar.

Find more news and video on relating to COVID-19 and its impact on radiology

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | March 27, 2020

Regina Druz, M.D., FASNC, a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Board of Directors, chairwomen of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Healthcare Innovation Section, and a cardiologist at Integrative Cardiology Center of Long Island, N.Y., explains the rapid expansion of telemedicine with the U.S. spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2).

Druz spoke on the unprecedented expansion of telemedicine in the U.S. under COVID-19, seeing more use in the last two months, as opposed to the past two decades. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) previously only reimbursed for Telehealth in rural areas it determined had a shortage of doctors. However, in early March 2020, CMS dropped the geographic requirements and allowed Telehealth usage across th country as a way to mitigate person-to-person contact and keep vulnerable, older patients at home for routine check ups with doctors.

Druz has subspecialty certifications in nuclear cardiology, adult echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography (CT) and explains how Telehealth can be used to pre-screen patients and get patient sign off on procedures prior to coming in for an exam, helping speed the process in the hospital and limit personal contact.

Concerns about the rpaid spread of COVID-19 also has driven many radiology departments to convert to wider use of teleradiology to allow more radiologists to work from home and reduce person-to-person contact within the hospitals. 

Watch the related VIDEO: Use of Teleradiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — an interview with John Kim, M.D., chairman, Department of Radiology, THR Presbyterian Plano, Texas, and chief technology officer at Texas Radiology Associates.

 

Related COVID-19 Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) — Interview with emergency physician Mike Stone, M.D.,

VIDEO: How China Leveraged Health IT to Combat COVID-19 — Interview with Jilan Liu, M.D., CEO for the HIMSS Greater China

Study Looks at CT Findings of COVID-19 Through Recovery

Experts Stress Radiology Preparedness for COVID-19

ACR Recommendations for the Use of Chest Radiography and CT for Suspected COVID-19 Cases

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

 

 

 

Information Technology View all 255 items

Artificial Intelligence | October 26, 2020

GE Healthcare is highlighting artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging, 

The new SonoLyst AI software can auto recognize 20 standard fetal views in the second trimester protocol. The goal is to speed exam times and make the exams more accurate, even for less experienced monographers. The AI can tell users what any image is when they freeze the frame. This can be used to help cue up measurements and appropriate annotations. The AI also can tell th user if all the required anatomical structures are in an image needed for the exam protocols.
 

Find more RSNA news and video

Artificial Intelligence | September 25, 2020

Ernest Garcia, Ph.D., MASNC, FAHA, endowed professor in cardiac imaging, director of nuclear cardiology R&D laboratory, Emory University, developer of the Emory Cardiac Tool Box used in nuclear imaging and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cardiac imaging. He said there is a tsunami of new AI applications that are starting to flood the FDA for market approval, and there are several examples of AI already in use in radiology. He spoke on this topic in a keynote session at the 2020 ASNC meeting.

 

Related Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Machine Learning for Diagnosis and Risk Prediction in Nuclear Cardiology — Interview with Piotr J. Slomka, Ph.D.,

Artificial Intelligence Applications in Cardiology

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Improve Cath Lab Interventions — Interview with Nick West, M.D., Abbott CMO

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence for Echocardiography at Mass General — Interview with Judy Hung, M.D.

VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — Interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

VIDEO: Overview of Artificial Intelligence and its Use in Cardiology — Interview with Anthony Chang, M.D.

For more AI in cardiology content

Remote Viewing Systems | September 09, 2020

Enterprise viewers are designed to provide fast and easy access to a patient’s imaging history, and today’s modern healthcare systems require a clinical viewer capable of meeting the diverse needs of a large group of users. GE Healthcare’s Zero Footprint Viewer can quickly and easily display digital images, video clips and cine loops from any department and on many different devices.

It provides access to images and reports from anywhere, whether it’s on the hospital floor, in surgery, in clinic or at home, to allow clinicians to access and develop clinical insights that deliver patient results and drive operational efficiencies.

Learn more at https://www.gehealthcare.com/products/healthcare-it/enterprise-imaging/centricity-universal-viewer-zero-footprint

Ultrasound Imaging | August 13, 2020

This is a tutorial video on how to perform an artificial intelligence (AI) automated cardiac ejection fraction measurement using the GE Healthcare Vscan Extend point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) system and the LVivo EF app, developed and licensed by DiA Imaging Analysis. This FDA-cleared app enables an automated edge detection of left ventricular endocardium and calculates end-diastolic, end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction, using apical 4-chamber view.

the LVivo EF app was showcased by GE Healthcare in its virtual booth at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2020 virtual meeting. POCUS imaging has emerged as a primary imaging modality for bedside assessment of COVID-19 patients in 2020.

 

Related ASE News and POCUS Content:

VIDEO: Automated Cardiac Ejection Fraction for Point-of-care-ultrasound Using Artificial Intelligence

LVivo EF Comparable to MRI, Contrast Echo in Assessing Ejection Fraction

GE Highlights New Echocardiography Technologies at ASE 2020

Other ASE news and video

Women's Health View all 74 items

MRI Breast | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to clearly identify breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue. In women with dense breasts, it can be very difficult to detect many cancers on standard mammograms because the cancers and dense tissue both appear white. MRI can help clearly define tumors and identify which nodules are cancer and which are benign, which can help greatly reduce the need for biopsies.

Kuhl is an expert in breast imaging and breast MRI. She helped develop an a shortened MRI protocol that allows breast MR images to be created in 3 minutes or less, rather than standard protocols that can take up to 30 minutes. In the interview she shows patient case examples of standard mammograms and the MRI supplemental imaging for the same patient to show the hidden tumors. 

She also explains the differences between standard 2-d mammography, the current standard of care, and the newer 3-D mammogram tomosythnesis technology, breast ultrasound and breast MRI technologies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Breast MRI Content:

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts — Interview with Christiane Kuhl, M.D.

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

Rapid Breast MRI Screening Improves Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts

Breast MRI in Cancer Diagnosis
 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) | October 14, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains how the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has impacted screening mammography and raised fears there will be a large increase in more advanced breast cancer cases in the near future as sizable numbers of women skip their annual exams this year. Kuhl also explains the COVID safety protocols most breast imaging centers are taking to limit any potential exposure to the virus from asymptomatic patients.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Explaining Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

 

How COVID Has Disrupted Screening Mammography and The Urgency to Resume Screenings:

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Half of Breast Cancer Survivors Had Delays in Care Due to COVID-19

Insight on the Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Imaging

Delay in Breast Cancer Operations Appears Non Life-threatening for Early-stage Disease

Hologic and Sheryl Crow Begin Back to Screening Campaign

A Slow Return to Normalcy in Breast Imaging

Breast Density | October 13, 2020

Professor Christiane Kuhl, M.D., director of radiology, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, explains what it means to have dense breasts and how density can hide cancers in mammograms. She offers an explanation describing dense breast tissue and that this occurs in about half of women. Density is itself a risk factor for breast cancer and the fact that dense tissue hides cancers on mammography means that supplemental imaging is needed to accurately diagnose these patients and avoid false positives, or needless tissue biopsies. Breast ultrasound and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to see through dense tissue to better identify cancers and avoid the need for many biopsies.

Other video interviews with Dr. Kuhl:

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Screening in Women With Dense Breasts

VIDEO: The Impact of COVID-19 on Breast Imaging

 

Related Dense Breast Content:

Breast Density Explained

Animation to Bring Clarity to Dense Breasts

Improving Clinical Image Quality for Breast Imaging

Breast Imaging in the Age of Coronavirus

Abbreviated MRI Outperforms 3-D Mammograms at Finding Cancer in Dense Breasts

VIDEO: Use of Breast MRI Improved Cancer Detection in Dense Breasts in Dutch Study — Interview with Gillian Newstead, M.D.

Technologies to Watch in Breast Imaging

Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients

 

Artificial Intelligence | February 06, 2020

ProFound AI is an FDA-cleared artificial intelligence (AI) system for reading 3-D breast tomosynthesis images. At RSNA19, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr spoke with iCad Chairman and CEO Michael Klein about the system, which has been clinically proven in a large reader study to produce an 8% average improvement in sensitivity, 7.2% average reduction in recall rate and 52.7% reduction in average radiologist reading time.