Feature | RSNA 2017 | January 11, 2018

Key RSNA 2017 Study Presentations, Trends and Video

Links to all the RSNA late-breaking clinical study presentations, key news and videos from the conference

RSNA 2017 technical exhibits, expo floor, showing new radiology technology advances.

January 11, 2018 — Here is a list of some of the key clinical study presentations, articles on trends and videos from the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting. Each item links back to articles or videos.

 

Key Study Presentations:

3 High-impact Clinical Trials At RSNA 2017

New Studies Show Brain Impact of Youth Football

Hip Steroid Injections Associated with Bone Changes

Weight Loss Through Exercise Alone Does Not Protect Knees

 

Neurofeedback Shows Promise in Treating Tinnitus

Male Triathletes May Be Putting Their Heart Health at Risk

Women Prefer Getting Mammograms Every Year

 

3-D-Printed Prosthetic Implants Could Improve Treatment for Hearing Loss

Radiology Offers Clues in Cases of Domestic Abuse and Sexual Assault

MRI Uncovers Brain Abnormalities in People With Depression and Anxiety

 

Overweight Women May Need More Frequent Mammograms

Migraines Linked to High Sodium Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid

Key RSNA 2017 Study Presentations, Trends and Video

 

Machine Learning Concerns Discussed at RSNA/AAPM Symposium

Coronary CT Often Misinterpreted With Higher Rates of CAD

Brain's Appetite Regulator Disrupted in Obese Teens

 

CT Shows Enlarged Aortas in Former Pro Football Players

Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

 

Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain

Fat Distribution in Women and Men Provides Clues to Heart Attack Risk

 

 

Key News and Video From RSNA 2017:

Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2017

Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For Radiology

Value in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Editor's Choice of the Most Innovative New Imaging Technology at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: Big Concerns Remain for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Safety at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: How Utilization of Artificial Intelligence Will Impact Radiology

VIDEO: The Impact of Breast Density Technology and Legislation

VIDEO: How Contrast-Enhanced Mammography Will Impact Breast Imaging

VIDEO: How Advanced Visualization and 3D Printing Can Improve Outcomes in Complex Cases

VIDEO: Examples of How Artificial Intelligence Will Improve Medical Imaging

VIDEO: Advances in MRI Neuro Quantification Software

VIDEO: New App Improves MRI Safety For Implantable Devices

VIDEO: Cybersecurity in the Medical Imaging Department

VIDEO: How Serious is MRI Gadolinium Retention in the Brain and Body?

VIDEO: What is New in Breast Imaging Technology

 

RSNA 2017 Blogs:

RSNA 2017: Often Real Systems (Were) Not Available

A Glimpse Into Radiology in the Developing World in Africa

Radiology Has Failed to Properly Assess or Track MRI Gadolinium Contrast Safety

 

 

See What Vendors Exhibited at RSNA 2017:

RSNA 2017 product listings by modality on the ITN FastPass microsite at www.rsnafastpass.com

 

 

RSNA 2017 Vendor Videos:

VIDEO: Konica Minolta Focuses on Efficiency at RSNA 2017

VIDEO: ZST+ Enables Significant Mindray Resona 7 Upgrade

VIDEO: NTT Data Services Empowers Medical Imaging Data

VIDEO: Vital Images Enterprise Imaging Solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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