News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 27, 2018

Thirty-Six Percent of Medical Facilities Not Compliant With MRI Safety Standards

MRI Safety Week survey by Metrasens shows many MRI providers must still make changes in protocol

Thirty-Six Percent of Medical Facilities Not Compliant With MRI Safety Standards

July 27, 2018 — Global magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety firm Metrasens recently conducted a survey in which 36 percent of 162 MRI professionals admitted they are not compliant with the Revised Requirements for Diagnostic Imaging Services. The standards were released in July of 2015 by the Joint Commission, a non-profit organization that accredits and certifies more than 21,000 healthcare organizations and programs in the United States.

The commission’s requirements state that MRI facilities should collect data on the following:

  • Incidents where ferromagnetic objects unintentionally entered the MRI scanner room; and
  • Injuries resulting from the presence of ferromagnetic objects in the MRI scanner room.

Ferromagnetic objects, such as oxygen tanks and wheelchairs, can become lethal projectiles when brought into an MRI room. They are attracted to the MRI’s strong magnetic field and are pulled at rapid speed toward the machine. This has led to serious injuries and, in some cases, death.

With MRI Safety Week taking place July 23-29, 2018, Metrasens is raising awareness in the healthcare community about solutions that are available to curtail such accidents from happening. The company specializes in ferromagnetic detection systems (FMDS) that identify dangerous objects before they come near the entries of MRI rooms and become a threat.

“The Joint Commission’s Diagnostic Imaging Standards state that hospitals manage safety risks in the MRI environment, but these survey results make it clear this is not being done,” said Tobias Gilk, a Metrasens consultant and MRI safety expert. “Without assessing and identifying the individual risks an MRI facility faces, managers have no way to implement mitigating practices and create effective policies that keep patients, family members and staff safe.”

MRI safety solutions offered by Metrasens include the MRI Safety Manager, which collects and categorizes the data required by the Joint Commission. MRI administrators can use this tool to identify ferromagnetic activity trends and generate reports.

In addition to its ferromagnetic detections systems, Metrasens also offers risk assessment consultancy services for MRI facilities.

For more information: www.metrasens.com

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