PET Imaging

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (also referred to as molecular imaging) that enables visualization of metabolic processes in the body. The basics of PET imaging is that the technique detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (also called radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclides or radiotracer). The tracer is injected into a vein on a biologically active molecule, usually a sugar that is used for cellular energy. PET systems have sensitive detector panels to capture gamma ray emissions from inside the body and use software to plot to triangulate the source of the emissions, creating 3-D computed tomography images of the tracer concentrations within the body.

Siemens Healthineers, SNMMI '16, molecular imaging, syngo.via, Biograph Horizon PET/CT, mobile configuration
News | Nuclear Imaging | June 09, 2016
June 9, 2016 — At the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), Siemens...
NaF-PET/CT, sodium fluoride, advanced prostate cancer, metastases, pilot study
News | PET-CT | June 07, 2016
June 7, 2016 — A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium...
Axumin, fluciclovine F-18 injection, PET imaging agent, recurrent prostate cancer, Blue Earth Diagnostics, Siemens PETNET Solutions
Technology | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | June 07, 2016
June 7, 2016 — Blue Earth Diagnostics Ltd. and Siemens’ PETNET Solutions Inc. announced the commercial availability of...
pet scan cancer

A PET-CT head and neck cancer scan showing various image reconstructions. The top left image is the separate CT scan showing the anatomy. The top right scan shows the fused PET and CT scans with false color added to help interpret the image. The bottom left scan is an initial FDG PET image showing tracer hot spots in the neck and a lymph node in the right jaw due to cancer. The right bottom image is a delayed enhancement scan showing tracer uptake over time, with normal hot spots in the bladder, kidneys, testicles and brain, which normally have higher metabolic activity. The low-grade gray shading of the anatomy is due to the normal cellular metabolism uptake of the FDG throughout the body. 

Feature | PET Imaging | June 03, 2016 | Dave Fornell
Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (also referred to as molecular imaging) that enables...
FDG-PET, brain injured patients, awareness, Current Biology study

This figure shows brain glucose metabolism as evidenced by positron emission tomography with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG) at rest in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness (vegetative state and minimally conscious patients) and fully conscious control subjects. Please notice the dramatic drop in brain glucose metabolism from full consciousness to the minimal conscious and persistent vegetative states. Image courtesy of Stender et al.

News | Nuclear Imaging | June 01, 2016
June 1, 2016 — Researchers have new evidence that readily obtainable measures of the amount of glucose (sugar) consumed...
screening, imaging

Graphic courtesy Pixabay

Blog | Radiology Imaging | June 01, 2016
Cancer screening is the only circumstance in which apparently healthy people subject themselves purposely to an agent...
China, computed bioconductance, CB, PET, positron emission tomography, lung lesions
News | PET Imaging | May 25, 2016
May 25, 2016 — Positron emission tomography (PET) is used commonly in the diagnosis of suspected lung cancer. Computed...
tau protein, Alzheimer's, PET scan, imaging agent, brain decline, Washington University in St. Louis

A study using a new PET imaging agent shows that measures of tau protein in the brain more closely track cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's disease compared with long-studied measures of amyloid beta. More red color indicates more tau protein. The image on the left shows the average tau accumulation in the brains of cognitively normal people, averaged over many individuals. The image on the right shows the average amount of tau buildup in the brains of multiple people with mild Alzheimer's symptoms. Scanning multiple individuals shows that the intensity of tau deposits correlates with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. Image courtesy of Matthew R. Brier.

News | PET Imaging | May 12, 2016
May 12, 2016 — A buildup of plaque and dysfunctional proteins in the brain are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease. While...
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 09, 2016
May 9, 2016 — A recent study demonstrates that Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (...
Carestream, oncology workflow, PET/CT, Vue Motion
Technology | Oncology Diagnostics | May 05, 2016
May 5, 2016 — Carestream now offers an oncology reading workflow for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed...

Early detection of cancer lesions with the latest generation of PET/CT scanners supports improved patient management. Yet much of PET’s potential, particularly for following patients and as a component in PET/MR, remains unrealized. (Image courtesy of Siemens Healthcare and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Feature | Radiology Imaging | April 29, 2016 | Greg Freiherr
Adopting medical technology because it is new or novel lost its luster a long time ago. It is little wonder then that...
Advances in PET/CT Technology

Photo courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Radiology Imaging | April 29, 2016 | Jeff Zagoudis
The last 12 months have seen significant growth in the positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)...
Will PET/MR Ever Be Widely Adopted?

PET/MR images courtesy of GE Healthcare

Blog | Molecular Imaging | April 27, 2016
In the world of molecular imaging, PET/MR is a wild card. But it’s a wild card that’s ready to be played. Three major...
Mirada Medical, The Christie Hospital, England, PET-MRI, radiation therapy
News | Nuclear Imaging | April 20, 2016
April 20, 2016 — Mirada Medical announced a new agreement to work with the clinicians and physicists at The Christie...
Why Politics (and Money) Will Define the Next Generation of Scanners

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Blog | Molecular Imaging | April 20, 2016
It’s been a long time since radiology focused just on the detection of disease. And it will never see those days again...
Why the Use of PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Requires Thinking Outside the Box

Graphic courtesy Pixabay

Blog | Molecular Imaging | April 13, 2016
The intersection between PET/CT and radiation therapy is widening. And it is doing so in unanticipated ways. You might...
PET, Hodgkin lymphoma, chemotherapy, remission, U.S. trial
News | PET Imaging | April 13, 2016
April 13, 2016 — Using positron emission tomography (PET) to guide chemotherapy treatment significantly increases the...
How to Achieve the Quantitative Promise of PET/CT

Image courtesy Siemens Healthcare

Blog | PET-CT | April 06, 2016
The good news for molecular imaging is that the latest generation of PET/CT can visualize more and subtler signs of...
PET/CT scan, brain stress center, heart disease predictor, ACC.16
News | PET-CT | April 05, 2016
April 5, 2016 — New research shows individuals with a greater degree of activity in the stress center of the brain also...
PET imaging, cancer treatment, UCLA study, Caius Radu, dCK
News | PET Imaging | March 29, 2016
March 29, 2016 —A promising new discovery by University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) scientists could lead to a new...