News | RSNA | July 21, 2021

Registration Now Open for RSNA21

The event will be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

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July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021.

“The COVID-19 pandemic reminded us of the critical importance of global cooperation and knowledge sharing within our specialty,” said RSNA president Mary C. Mahoney, M.D. “RSNA 2021 will provide a long-awaited opportunity to reconnect with colleagues from near and far, experience a wealth of educational opportunities, and explore the latest medical imaging research discoveries and technological advances.”

RSNA 2021: Redefining Radiology will showcase new ideas and technologies that redefine what it means to work as a radiologist. With more than 2,000 presenters and more than 300 live educational courses, the meeting promises to deliver an outstanding program with a multitude of science, education and CME opportunities for radiology professionals from around the world. Popular features like the Image Interpretation Session and Case of the Day will offer dynamic experiences for attendees. Also returning is the rapid-fire “Fast 5”—brisk and engaging presentations on how medical insight and research are driving the future of radiology. The Discovery Theater returns in 2021 with lively presentations and entertainment.

“We have an outstanding plenary program highlighting timely, relevant topics in radiology presented by some of the leading experts in the field,” Mahoney said.

In addition to Mahoney’s President’s Address, “Redefining Radiology: The Road Ahead,” Sunday’s opening session features James Merlino, M.D., of Cleveland Clinic, discussing strategies radiologists can adopt to create a state-of-the-art patient experience. On Monday, James A. Brink, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital, will discuss radiology’s role in value-based health care. On Tuesday, Michele Johnson, M.D., Yale University, and Christine Porath, Ph.D., Georgetown University, will share actionable ways radiologists can help achieve equitable patient care and a thriving work environment, and on Wednesday, Iris C. Gibbs, M.D., Stanford, will address the need to improve diversity in radiation oncology.

Thursday’s RSNA/AAPM Symposium will highlight the successful collaboration at Mayo Clinic between radiologists and physicists toward technical developments and clinical translations in medical imaging.

As the world’s largest medical imaging conference, RSNA 2021 also provides the ultimate show floor for demonstrating the latest medical imaging technologies in CT, MRI, artificial intelligence (AI), 3D printing, and more. The technical exhibition will once again feature the expansive AI Showcase and Theater, as well as the 3D Printing and Mixed Reality Showcase, the First-time Exhibitor Pavilion, Educators Row and Recruiters Row. Currently, there are 518 confirmed exhibitors occupying 342,600 square feet of exhibit space, including 103 exhibitors occupying 34,900 square feet in the AI Showcase.

RSNA 2021’s virtual meeting component will allow those who have been impacted by institutional, corporate or national travel restrictions the opportunity to participate in the meeting.

As part of RSNA’s commitment to creating an inclusive experience for all radiology professionals, Camp RSNA—onsite childcare that has been in operation for more than 20 years—will be offered this year at no cost to members. For those traveling to the meeting with children, Camp RSNA provides a safe environment with a creative, customized schedule of events and a variety of engaging age-appropriate activities led by trained professionals.

Several registration packages are available, including in-person and virtual access, in-person only, virtual only, and technical exhibits only. In-person registration is free to RSNA members through October 1. Hotel reservations are available. 

For more information: www.rsna.org

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