PET Imaging

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (also referred to as molecular imaging) that enables visualization of metabolic processes in the body. The basics of PET imaging is that the technique detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (also called radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclides or radiotracer). The tracer is injected into a vein on a biologically active molecule, usually a sugar that is used for cellular energy. PET systems have sensitive detector panels to capture gamma ray emissions from inside the body and use software to plot to triangulate the source of the emissions, creating 3-D computed tomography images of the tracer concentrations within the body.

Videos | Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017
David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American...
News | Prostate Cancer | April 24, 2017
April 24, 2017 — Cancer Targeted Technology recently announced it is focusing on small molecules that target pivotal...
PET
Feature | Radiology Imaging | April 11, 2017 | By Greg Freiherr
Positron emission tomography (PET) and other brain assessments...
FDG-PET, cell mutations, lung cancer patients, non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC, Journal of Nuclear Medicine study

From left to right are patients with EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, and EGFR– and KRAS– tumors, respectively. Stage I and III tumors are shown in the top and bottom rows, respectively. Arrows indicate the locations of the lung tumors. Credit: Stephen S.F. Yip, Ph.D., and Hugo Aerts, Ph.D., Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston; John Kim, M.D., University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Mich.

News | PET Imaging | April 05, 2017
April 5, 2017 — Researchers have used positron...
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, MR-PET scanner, first in Illinois, Siemens Biograph mMR
News | PET-MRI | March 31, 2017
March 31, 2017 — Northwestern Memorial Hospital is now home to the Chicago area's first combined magnetic resonance (...
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 29, 2017
March 29, 2017 — Advanced Accelerator Applications S.A. announced that its product NETSPOT (gallium Ga-68 dotatate) has...
lung cancer recurrence, biomarker blood test, CT scans, 2017 Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium, clinical study
News | Lung Cancer | March 28, 2017
March 28, 2017 — Results from a prospective clinical trial showed a blood test looking at specific biomarkers was able...
PET/CT, recurrent prostate cancer, fluciclovine F-18, Emory University

CTVPOST (red) = CTVPRE (yellow) union CTVPET (pink). Also shown (upper right corner) are the PRE (square) vs POST (triangle) dose volume histograms for PTV1, PTV2, rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, showing minimal impact on target coverage or organs at risk dose with the modified targets. Image courtesy of Ashesh B. Jani, M.D., and David Schuster, M.D., Emory University.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 16, 2017
March 16, 2017 — The featured clinical investigation article of the March 2017 issue of the ...
X0000_Piramal_Neuraceq PET agent_beta amyloid plaque imaging.jpg
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 09, 2017
March 9, 2017 — Piramal Imaging SA and Isologic Innovative Radiopharmaceuticals recently announced that Health Canada...
PET imaging, atherosclerotic plaque, inflammation, Ga-68-pentixafor, Technishe Universitat Munchen, Germany

Note the high uptake of Ga-68-pentixafor on multi-planar reconstructions in the organs expressing CXCR4 such as the spleen (red arrows) and adrenal glands (yellow arrows), which was nearly completely blocked by the pre-injection of AMD 3100, a potent CXCR4 inhibitor. Strong accumulation of Ga-68-pentixafor was also found in the kidneys (asterisks) reflecting the renal clearance of the tracer. In addition, high, focal activities were detected in the abdominal aorta (red arrowheads) and right carotid artery (orange arrowheads) of atherosclerotic rabbits, whereas no significant signal could be detected in the non-injured left carotid artery (white arrowheads) of atherosclerotic and control rabbits, as well as in the abdominal aorta and right carotid artery of control rabbits. Furthermore, focal activities detected with PET in atherosclerotic plaques of the abdominal aorta and the right carotid artery decreased significantly when the same rabbit was re-imaged after blocking CXCR4 receptors. Image courtesy of Fabien Hyafil, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany

News | PET Imaging | March 03, 2017
March 3, 2017 — In the featured article of the March 2017 issue of...
PET/CT, primary and metastatic prostate cancer, Journal of Nuclear Medicine study, JNM

Ga-68-BBN PET/CT of a 64-year-old man newly diagnosed with prostate cancer by biopsy. Multiple bone metastasis lesions (arrows) were detected. Image courtesy of Jingjing Zhang, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

News | Prostate Cancer | February 02, 2017
February 2, 2017 — In the featured article from the February 2017 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers...
News | PET Imaging | January 25, 2017
January 25, 2017 — In work published this week in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), a team led by Jacob...
Medrad Intego PET Infusion System, recall
News | Nuclear Imaging | January 12, 2017
January 12, 2017 — Bayer Healthcare has initiated a recall of all its Medrad Intego PET Infusion System Source...
News | Prostate Cancer | December 14, 2016
December 14, 2016 — Cancer Targeted Technology (CTT), a privately-held Seattle-based biotechnology firm focusing on...
Numa, NumaStatus, radiation dose reporting software, RSNA 2016
News | Radiation Dose Management | December 08, 2016
December 8, 2016 — Numa introduced a new software application at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of...
prostate cancer, PET imaging, Johns Hopkins, Daniel Thorek, 11B6 antibody

Uptake of 89Zr-11B6 in the prostate of a transgenic mouse with prostate cancer. Image courtesy of Daniel Thorek

News | Prostate Cancer | November 30, 2016
November 30, 2016 — An international group of researchers report success in mice of a method of using...
Medic Vision, 2016 growth, RSNA, dose management, reporting, SafeCT
News | Radiation Dose Management | November 10, 2016
November 10, 2016 — Medic Vision Imaging Solutions Ltd. announced recently that the company has tripled its growth....
Alzheimer's disease, early diagnosis, PET scans, imaging compound, Fluselenamyl

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a chemical compound that detects the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta better than current FDA-approved agents. The compound potentially may be used in brain scans to identify people in the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease. In the image, the compound has passed from the bloodstream of a living mouse into its brain, where it is detected by a positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Arrows indicate clumps of amyloid beta. Credit Ping Yan and Jin-Moo Lee.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | November 02, 2016
November 2, 2016 — By the time unambiguous signs of memory loss and cognitive decline appear in people with Alzheimer’s...