PET Imaging

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (also referred to as molecular imaging) that enables visualization of metabolic processes in the body. The basics of PET imaging is that the technique detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (also called radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclides or radiotracer). The tracer is injected into a vein on a biologically active molecule, usually a sugar that is used for cellular energy. PET systems have sensitive detector panels to capture gamma ray emissions from inside the body and use software to plot to triangulate the source of the emissions, creating 3-D computed tomography images of the tracer concentrations within the body.

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News | Clinical Trials | June 09, 2017

The milestone Imaging Dementia — Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study is working with government and academic...

Toshiba Medical launches its new Celesteion PUREViSION Edition PET/CT system to help diagnose and treat oncology patients

Toshiba Medical launches its new Celesteion PUREViSION Edition PET/CT system to help diagnose and treat oncology patients.

News | PET-CT | June 09, 2017

Oncologists have access to advanced imaging technologies for excellent cancer patient care with the new Celesteion...

Siemens Healthineers Debuts Symbia Intevo Bold SPECT/CT
News | SPECT-CT | June 08, 2017

Siemens Healthineers debuts Symbia Intevo Bold at the 2017 annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine &...

Lantheus and GE Healthcare Sign Agreement for Worldwide Development, Commercialization of Flurpiridaz F-18
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 22, 2017

May 22, 2017 — Lantheus Holdings Inc., parent company of Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc., and GE Healthcare announced...

FALCON Trial of Fluciclovine PET/CT Imaging Stops Recruitment after Successful Interim Analysis
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 15, 2017

May 15, 2017 — Blue Earth Diagnostics announced that the Trial Steering Committee recommended further recruitment be...

A low-dose lung CT scan can be used to help detect mesothelioma.

An example of a low-dose CT scan of the lungs, showing lung cancer. Image courtesy of Toshiba.

Feature | Lung Cancer | May 05, 2017 | Alison Grimes

The term mesothelioma was coined in 1909, just a few years after the introduction of medical X-ray imaging. The term...

PET/CT

The Philips Ingenuity TF PET/CT system leverages multiple technologies.

Feature | Radiation Oncology | May 05, 2017 | By Lola Koktysh

The continuum of personalized care, covering individualized prevention and therapy, translates into multiple changes...

PET/CT Helps Predict Therapy Effectiveness in Pediatric Brain Tumors

FIGURE: MRI AND PET-MRI FUSION IMAGES OF PATIENTS WITH DIPG. Top row: Zr-89-bevacizumab PET (144 hrs p.i.) fused with T1-Gd weighted MRI per patient; middle row: T1-Gd weighted MRI; lower row: T2-weighted/FLAIR MR-images. Five tumors show variable uptake of Zr-89-bevacizumab (white arrows), with both PET negative and positive areas within each tumor. Two primary tumors are completely PET negative (Fig. 1C and 1E), while the T2 weighted images show tumor infiltration in the whole pons of both patients. In the middle row, the red arrows represent the areas of contrast enhancement within the tumor. In four out of five primary tumors, the PET-positive area corresponds with the contrast-enhancing area on MRI of the tumors (Fig. 1A, 1B, 1F and 1G). In Fig. 1C, the tumor shows an MRI contrast-enhancing area, while there is no Zr-89-bevacizumab uptake. Fig. 1D shows a PET positive tumor, while no Gd-enhancement is observed on MRI. Credit: Sophie Veldhuijzen van Zanten and Marc Jansen, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

News | PET-CT | May 02, 2017

May 2, 2017 — In a first-ever molecular drug-imaging study in children, researchers in The Netherlands used whole-...

Australian Team Finds New Method for Producing PET Radiotracers in Higher Radiochemical Yields
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | April 28, 2017

April 28, 2017 — Researchers at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have led the...

Videos | Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017

David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American...

News | Prostate Cancer | April 24, 2017

April 24, 2017 — Cancer Targeted Technology recently announced it is focusing on small molecules that target pivotal...

PET
Feature | Radiology Imaging | April 11, 2017 | By Greg Freiherr
FDG-PET, cell mutations, lung cancer patients, non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC, Journal of Nuclear Medicine study

From left to right are patients with EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, and EGFR– and KRAS– tumors, respectively. Stage I and III tumors are shown in the top and bottom rows, respectively. Arrows indicate the locations of the lung tumors. Credit: Stephen S.F. Yip, Ph.D., and Hugo Aerts, Ph.D., Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston; John Kim, M.D., University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Mich.

News | PET Imaging | April 05, 2017

April 5, 2017 — Researchers have used ...

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, MR-PET scanner, first in Illinois, Siemens Biograph mMR
News | PET-MRI | March 31, 2017

March 31, 2017 — Northwestern Memorial Hospital is now home to the Chicago area's first combined magnetic resonance...

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 29, 2017

March 29, 2017 — Advanced Accelerator Applications S.A. announced that its product NETSPOT (gallium Ga-68 dotatate)...

lung cancer recurrence, biomarker blood test, CT scans, 2017 Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium, clinical study
News | Lung Cancer | March 28, 2017

March 28, 2017 — Results from a prospective clinical trial showed a blood test looking at specific biomarkers was...

PET/CT, recurrent prostate cancer, fluciclovine F-18, Emory University

CTVPOST (red) = CTVPRE (yellow) union CTVPET (pink). Also shown (upper right corner) are the PRE (square) vs POST (triangle) dose volume histograms for PTV1, PTV2, rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, showing minimal impact on target coverage or organs at risk dose with the modified targets. Image courtesy of Ashesh B. Jani, M.D., and David Schuster, M.D., Emory University.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 16, 2017

March 16, 2017 — The featured clinical investigation article of the March 2017 issue of the ...

X0000_Piramal_Neuraceq PET agent_beta amyloid plaque imaging.jpg
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | March 09, 2017

March 9, 2017 — Piramal Imaging SA and Isologic Innovative Radiopharmaceuticals recently announced that Health...

PET imaging, atherosclerotic plaque, inflammation, Ga-68-pentixafor, Technishe Universitat Munchen, Germany

Note the high uptake of Ga-68-pentixafor on multi-planar reconstructions in the organs expressing CXCR4 such as the spleen (red arrows) and adrenal glands (yellow arrows), which was nearly completely blocked by the pre-injection of AMD 3100, a potent CXCR4 inhibitor. Strong accumulation of Ga-68-pentixafor was also found in the kidneys (asterisks) reflecting the renal clearance of the tracer. In addition, high, focal activities were detected in the abdominal aorta (red arrowheads) and right carotid artery (orange arrowheads) of atherosclerotic rabbits, whereas no significant signal could be detected in the non-injured left carotid artery (white arrowheads) of atherosclerotic and control rabbits, as well as in the abdominal aorta and right carotid artery of control rabbits. Furthermore, focal activities detected with PET in atherosclerotic plaques of the abdominal aorta and the right carotid artery decreased significantly when the same rabbit was re-imaged after blocking CXCR4 receptors. Image courtesy of Fabien Hyafil, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany

News | PET Imaging | March 03, 2017

March 3, 2017 — In the featured article of the March 2017 issue of...