News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 31, 2021

Use of Face Masks in the MRI Environment

#coronavirus #COVID19 #pandemic Face masks may contain metallic components, both visible and hidden, which in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment may pose a hazard. The role of face masks in infection control is recognized and their use should not be avoided as simple practices can avoid these hazards.

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March 31, 2021 — Face masks may contain metallic components, both visible and hidden, which in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment may pose a hazard. The role of face masks in infection control is recognized and their use should not be avoided as simple practices can avoid these hazards.

Metallic components may cause deflection or displacement of masks reducing effectiveness. Metallic components may also cause heating when worn by the patient during scanning, with one reported incident in the United States.

Masks worn by patients undergoing MRI should not contain metallic components. Due to the risk of hidden and unlabelled metal in patients’ own masks, MRI departments should maintain a supply of suitable non-metallic face masks for use by patients during scanning.

This statement was initiated by the British Institute of Radiology (BIR) MR Safety Working Party.

For more information: www.bir.org.uk

 

Additional MRI Safety Content:

FDA Reminds Patients to Wear COVID Face Masks with No Metal During MRI Exams

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VIDEO: Identifying and Eliminating MRI Safety Hazards

How To Manage Risk in the MR Suite

Closing the Loopholes in MRI Safety

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Medical Device Safety in MRI Environment

Study Assesses Risk of MRI Exams for Patients With Tattoos

MRI Safety and Technology Updates

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