News | Computed Tomography (CT) | October 24, 2019

Philips Bringing Incisive CT Platform to North America

New CT platform with ‘Tube for Life’ guarantee helps imaging departments and healthcare organizations achieve their financial, clinical and operational goals

Philips Bringing Incisive CT Platform to North America

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Philips Incisive CT OnPlan gantry controls

The Incisive CT platform includes Philips' OnPlan gantry controls, allowing the technologist to do more at the scanner. Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

October 24, 2019 — Following its launch at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) in February, Philips is now bringing its Incisive Computed Tomography (CT) platform to North America. Incisive CT integrates innovations in imaging, workflow and lifecycle management, helping healthcare providers to improve the CT experience for patients and staff, enabling smart clinical decision-making and increasing efficiency.

The Incisive CT helps providers manage operational costs so more attention can be focused on optimizing patient care. With its ‘Tube for Life’ guarantee [1], Philips will replace the Incisive’s X-ray tube – a key component of any CT system – at no additional cost throughout the entire life of the system, potentially lowering operating expenses by an estimated $420,000 [2]. To minimize the cost of obsolescence, the system is available with the Philips Technology Maximizer program, which provides the latest available software and hardware updates as they are released.

Read the article “Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades”

In addition to economic value, the Incisive CT incorporates a range of innovations to support high image quality at a low dose, while also enhancing efficiency and workflow. It includes DoseWise Portal, a web-based dose monitoring solution that collects, measures, analyzes and reports patient and staff radiation exposure, assisting in control of quality of care, efficiency, and patient and staff safety. Philips’ new OnPlan patient-side gantry controls let the technologist do more directly from the scanner, such as setup and pre-scan adjustments, minimizing time spent away from the patient.

The Philips Incisive CT will make its North American debut at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, taking place Dec. 1-6 in Chicago. 

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare

References

1. Life of the product is defined by Philips as 10 years. Tube for Life guarantee availability varies by country. Please contact your local Philips sales representative for details.

2. Actual operating costs for customers vary significantly because many variables exist (such as CT make and model, hospital/imaging center size, case mix, system usage). The potential savings identified estimates the avoidance of purchasing replacement tubes over a 10-year useful life of a CT system, based on an average selling price of $140,000 per replacement tube and estimated tube life of 3 years. There can be no guarantee that all customers will achieve this result. Tube for Life guarantee availability varies by country.

Related Content

According to ARRS’ American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the resources required to warm iohexol 350 to body temperature before injection for computed tomography (CT) may not be warranted, given the lack of observed practical benefit.

Values represent number of patients, with percentage in parentheses and 95% CI in brackets (not reported for levels of severity of allergic/allergic-like reactions). 95% CIs were calculated using the Clopper-Pearson exact formula. For events with zero frequency, one-sided 97.5% CIs are provided.

News | Contrast Media | July 30, 2021
Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery.

Images, or a digital twin mitral valve of a patient, created from cardiac ultrasound that were used to perform a virtual surgical procedure to test how the intervention would impact the patient prior to actually performing the procedure. The right image shows color coding for sheer stresses on the valve leaflets before and after the virtual surgery. The left image shows the model quantitation of leaflet coaptation at peak systole prior to the the virtual surgery. Read the original article in Plos One.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | July 28, 2021
Outside of medicine, computer-generated virtual twins of real machines like cars or airplanes have been used in engin
Videos | Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2021
This is an overview of trends and technologies in radiology...
This change will be debuted at HIMSS 2021, and Vital will be exhibiting as Canon Medical for the first time
News | Information Technology | July 22, 2021
July 22, 2021 — Canon Medical Systems Corpora
An example of Viz.AI's pulmonary embolism AI application and mobile alert to the physician on-call. Viz.AI and Avicenna.AI Partner to Launch Artificial Intelligence Care Coordination for Pulmonary Embolism and Aortic Disease

An example of Viz.AI's pulmonary embolism AI application and mobile alert to the physician on-call. 

News | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Artificial int...
Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 107th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting, the world’s largest annual radiology forum, to be held at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | July 21, 2021
July 21, 2021 — Registration is now open for the Radiological Society of North America (...