Technology | Radiology Imaging | January 17, 2018

Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades

Five-year, cross-modality program for structured upgrades maximizes clinical value of Philips imaging system investments, helps manage security risks

Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades

January 17, 2018 — Philips recently announced the launch of Technology Maximizer, a cross-modality program designed to boost the clinical capabilities and performance of imaging equipment through proactive upgrades. Technology Maximizer provides confidence to radiology and cardiology department leaders and clinicians that their systems are up to date and compliant at a fraction of the cost of individual upgrades, according to Philips.  

Equipment performance is key to increasing efficiency, which is vital for hospitals looking to increase their quality of patient care. When departments are efficient, they become stronger and more productive. Proactive upgrades help keep imaging equipment up to date, which is important for managing security risk. These updates also help keep systems well-maintained, compliant and protected from obsolescence, which helps decrease unexpected downtime. However, complicated financial processes and overburdened staff can often create barriers to obtaining needed and timely system upgrades.

With Philips' Technology Maximizer, healthcare organizations no longer need to upgrade systems or software on an individual basis. Through regular upgrades and by refreshing existing hardware, this five-year subscription program provides radiology and cardiology departments with the latest software and hardware updates while maintaining cost efficiency through a predictable fee. Technology Maximizer is available for selected Philips magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), image-guided therapy (IGT) and ultrasound systems, and runs in tandem with existing RightFit Customer Service Agreements.

Philips' Technology Maximizer Pro option provides additional benefits. Organizations that select the Pro option for a clinical domain will automatically receive the latest specialty applications for the domain as Philips releases them. For example, Technology Maximizer Pro is available for MR systems in body, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and neurology domains.

Technology Maximizer will be commercially available globally, including in North America as well as select markets in Europe, Latin America and Asia Pacific, starting in early 2018.  Technology Maximizer customers will have the latest available software and hardware technology releases for a fraction of the cost of purchasing them individually as an added subscription benefit.

Philips showcased Technology Maximizer at the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Annual Meeting, Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare

 

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