News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 26, 2020

Virtual Imaging Trials Optimize CT, Radiography for COVID-19

Computational patient models and human phantom with coronavirus abnormalities via multidiagnostic confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection yield 'realistic' texture and shape

B, Representative computational model shows lung stroma intraorgan structure of XCAT phantom that was developed using anatomically informed mathematic model. Inset shows enlarged view for better visibility of details and small structures. C, Voxelized rendition (ground truth) of XCAT phantom highlights detailed model of lung parenchyma. Inset shows enlarged view for better visibility of details and small structures

B, Representative computational model shows lung stroma intraorgan structure of XCAT phantom that was developed using anatomically informed mathematic model. Inset shows enlarged view for better visibility of details and small structures. C, Voxelized rendition (ground truth) of XCAT phantom highlights detailed model of lung parenchyma. Inset shows enlarged view for better visibility of details and small structures. Image courtesy of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

August 26, 2020 — An open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) established a foundation for the use of virtual imaging trials in effective assessment and optimization of computed tomography (CT) and radiography acquisitions and analysis tools to help manage the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

Virtual imaging trials have two main components — representative models of targeted subjects and realistic models of imaging scanners — and the authors of this AJR article developed the first computational models of patients with COVID-19, while showing, as proof of principle, how they can be combined with imaging simulators for COVID-19 imaging studies.

"For the body habitus of the models," lead author Ehsan Abadi explained, "we used the 4-D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) model that was developed at Duke University."

Abadi and his Duke colleagues then segmented the morphologic features of COVID-19 abnormalities from 20 CT images of patients with multidiagnostic confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection and incorporated them into XCAT models.

"Within a given disease area, the texture and material of the lung parenchyma in the XCAT were modified to match the properties observed in the clinical images," Abadi et al. continued.

Using a specific CT scanner (Definition Flash, Siemens Healthineers) and validated radiography simulator (DukeSim) to help illustrate utility, the team virtually imaged three developed COVID-19 computational phantoms.

"Subjectively," the authors concluded, "the simulated abnormalities were realistic in terms of shape and texture," adding their preliminary results showed that the contrast-to-noise ratios in the abnormal regions were 1.6, 3.0, and 3.6 for 5-, 25-, and 50-mAs images, respectively.

For more information: www.arrs.org

Related Coronavirus Content:

VIDEO: Imaging COVID-19 With Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

Cardiac Imaging Best Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic

RSNA Publishes COVID-19 Best Practices for Radiology Departments

ASE Guidelines for the Protection of Echocardiography Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak
New CT Scoring Criteria for Timely Diagnosis, Treatment of Coronavirus Disease

FDA Issues New Policy for Imaging Systems During COVID-19

VIDEO: COVID-19 Precautions for Cardiac Imaging —  Interview with Stephen Bloom, M.D.

A Review of Studies Cautions Against Chest CT for Coronavirus Diagnosis

New Research Finds Chest X-ray Not Reliable Diagnostic Tool for COVID-19

VIDEO: Radiology Industry Responding to COVID-19

University of Washington Issues Radiology Policies for COVID-19

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic — Interview with Hicham Skali, M.D.

New Research Highlights Blood Clot Dangers of COVID-19

Survey Reveals Most Medical Practices are Now Using Telehealth Due to COVID-19

CMS Offers Recommendations on Reopening Healthcare in Areas of Low COVID-19 Cases

CT Provides Best Diagnosis for Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Radiology Lessons for Coronavirus From the SARS and MERS Epidemics

Radiologists Describe Coronavirus CT Imaging Features

CT Imaging of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

Related Content

Researchers led by Göttingen University develop new three-dimensional imaging technique to visualize tissue damage in severe COVID-19

T Salditt, M Eckermann

Sections through the three-dimensional reconstruction volume (upper left, grey) around a pulmonary alveolus with hyaline membrane (lower left, yellow). On the right, the images are superimposed. In the centre is the air bubble (alveolus). The electron density is represented by different shades of grey. On the inside of the air bubble is a layer of proteins and dead cell residues, the "hyaline membrane". This deposit, which can be represented in its three-dimensional structure for the first time by the new method, reduces the gas exchange and leads to respiratory distress.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 25, 2020
August 25, 2020 — Physicists at the University of Göttingen
Metova, a leading provider of custom software solutions for mobile, web, connected home and car, and Internet of Things (IoT) for the private and public sector and Innovator Health, a leading provider of telehealth and telemedicine solutions, announced the results of a new survey of over 1,000 people in the United States on telemedicine – a technology that's reviving the house call during the COVID-19 pandemic
News | Patient Engagement | August 21, 2020
August 21, 2020 — Metova, a leading provider of custom software s
The results of an online questionnaire of 609 breast cancer survivors in the U.S. suggest that nearly half of patients experienced delays in care during the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 19, 2020
August 19, 2020 — The...
During the SCCT 2020 virtual meeting, SCCT President Ron Blankstein, M.D., Brigham and Women's, presented the SCCT Gold Award to John Lesser, M.D., MSCCT, director of advanced imaging and cardiac CT, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital. 

During the SCCT 2020 virtual meeting, SCCT President Ron Blankstein, M.D., Brigham and Women's, presented the SCCT Gold Award to John Lesser, M.D., MSCCT, director of advanced imaging and cardiac CT, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital. 

News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 14, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Sheer stresses on the walls of arteries are believed to cause the formation atherosclerotic plaques. This is an area of research that is expected to see increased use in the next few years. This study was presented at SCCT 2020 as an example of how sheer stresses can help evaluate and predict the patency of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG).

Sheer stresses on the walls of arteries are believed to cause the formation atherosclerotic plaques. This is an area of research that is expected to see increased use in the next few years. This study was presented at SCCT 2020 as an example of how sheer stresses can help evaluate and predict the patency of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG).

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 14, 2020
The latest technical advances and trends in...
a) Includes scintigraphy and PET with and without concomitant CT. b) Includes conventional radiography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, fluoroscopy, and radiography performed during radiologic interventions. c) Includes general, cardiothoracic, maxillary, plastic, and orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. d) Includes allergology, cardiology, geriatrics, general internal medicine, pulmonology, gastroenterology, and rheumatology

a) Includes scintigraphy and PET with and without concomitant CT. b) Includes conventional radiography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, fluoroscopy, and radiography performed during radiologic interventions. c) Includes general, cardiothoracic, maxillary, plastic, and orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery. d) Includes allergology, cardiology, geriatrics, general internal medicine, pulmonology, gastroenterology, and rheumatology. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Radiology Imaging | August 14, 2020
August 14, 2020 — According to ARRS' ...
There was a higher incidence and severity of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) among patients seen at a large, academic medical center in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the prior three years, according to new a study published in Radiology.

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 13, 2020
August 13, 2020 — There was a higher incidence and severity of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) among patient