Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 06, 2017

Toshiba Launches Vantage Titan 1.5T cS Edition MR System

FDA-cleared cS Edition engineered for more efficient and standardized cardiac exams

Toshiba, Vantage Titan 1.5T cS Edition, MRI, RSNA 2016, cardiac exams, FDA clearance

January 6, 2017 — Toshiba Medical announced in November that its Vantage Titan 1.5T/cS Edition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with M-Power V3.6 software received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance at the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The new system retains all the patient-friendly features of the Vantage Titan 1.5T MR with added technology to simplify complex cardiac exams.

The Vantage Titan / cS Edition offers cardiologists and radiologists a comprehensive suite of innovative applications to help them improve their workflow and patient comfort:

  • SUREVOI with CardioLine+ (Option): The system offers SUREVOI Cardiac anatomy recognition technology to automatically determine the position of the heart. The enhanced CardioLine application CardioLine+ works with SUREVOI to automatically detect anatomical landmarks for accurate and reproducible positioning to complete alignment of 14 standard cardiac views with minimal operator interaction;
  • Multi b-Value Diffusion: The Vantage Titan / cS Edition allows acquisition of multiple b-values in a single scan enabling physicians to quickly identify tissue diffusivity;
  • Multi-echo T2 Mapping: The system also supports Multi-echo T2 Mapping, enabling physicians to visualize T2 map cartilage images to aid them in making a diagnosis and determining if treatment is needed; and
  • Vitrea Extend (Option): The Vitrea Extend application permits clinicians to complete post-processing at a separate workstation while allowing the next patient exam to be conducted at the magnetic resonance (MR) system. The Vitrea Extend solution comes with expert packages powered by the latest post-processing applications made by Olea Medical and Medis.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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