News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 26, 2016

Study Highlights Sedation Alternatives for Children Undergoing MRI

Mock MRI scanners, MR-compatible audiovisual systems and feed-sleep manipulation found to be most effective and provide greatest cost savings

ASRT, Radiologic Technology, clinical study, MRI, sedation alternatives, children, pediatric patients

October 26, 2016 — Hospitals should consider mock magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions, MR-compatible audiovisual systems and feed-sleep manipulation strategies before sedating pediatric patients preparing for MR procedures, according to a new study.

The importance of assessing alternatives to sedation and general anesthesia before MR procedures, the effectiveness of sedation alternatives and an analysis of their cost savings are among the topics covered in a literature review published in the American Society of Radiologic Technologists’ scientific journal, Radiologic Technology.

Delaney McGuirt, B.S., R.T.(R)(MR), a radiologic technologist from the University of North Carolina Biomedical Research Imaging Center, used online databases to review dozens of studies published within the past 10 years to identify the most effective alternatives to sedation or general anesthesia for pediatric patients undergoing an MRI examination.

MR procedures require patients to remain still in a confined space for long periods. This can be extremely difficult for pediatric patients. According to McGuirt, preprocedural sedation or general anesthesia is commonly used to relax patients eight years old and younger. However, pediatric sedation is associated with a higher risk of respiratory depression resulting from oversedation, potentially causing a loss of protective reflexes and airway maintenance. As a result, alternative methods of preparing infants and children for MR examinations should be explored to reduce patient risk, as well as time and cost to facilities.

“Any measure that can be taken to increase the safety of patients is worth exploring, especially when dealing with the particularly sensitive population that is pediatrics,” said McGuirt.

In her research, McGuirt identified the eight most commonly used alternatives to pediatric sedation in MRI preparation: mock scanner, MR-compatible audiovisual system, feed-sleep manipulation, play therapy, incubators/immobilizers, photo diary, sucrose solution and guided imagery. Of the eight, mock scanner, MR-compatible audiovisual system and feed-sleep manipulation showed to be the most effective and provided the greatest cost savings.

The literature review reports that mock scanners — full-scale replicas of MR imaging units devoid of internal magnets — have a high success rate with guiding children through successful MR procedures and providing cost savings. For example, a program at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Australia that uses a mock scanner to prepare patients noted an 8.6 percent reduction in general anesthesia rates. Also, of 102 children who used the mock scanner, 98 percent went on to have a successful MRI procedure. Moreover, the hospital compared a full-scale mock MR examination, including staff and maintenance, with that of general anesthesia and found an estimated annual net savings of $117,870.

MR-compatible audiovisual systems, which allow patients to watch and listen to a movie during their scan, have a solid success rate as well, according to the literature review. McGuirt referenced a number of studies that showed high success rates using MR-compatible audiovisual systems, including one that reported an overall 9 percent reduction in sedation rates and a 13 percent decrease in sedation rates among children 3 to 10 years old.

Feed-sleep manipulation, a process where a child’s normal feeding and sleeping patterns are modified, is also effective, but primarily with children younger than four years of age. In addition, McGuirt cited several studies that showed high success rates (up to 96 percent), when scans were completed during children’s natural sleep cycle.

“Instead of relying on sedation, facilities should invest time in developing alternative methods for pre-procedural MRI preparation. Research has shown this has the potential to decrease possible hazards to the pediatric patient, as well as cut costs,” said McGuirt.

McGuirt stressed that current resources fail to provide a comprehensive review of all existing alternative sedation methods, and further investigation is needed to identify a best practice.

For more information: www.radiologictechnology.org

Related Content

Avoiding contrast dyes for imaging tests not necessary if concerned about iodine allergy, peer-reviewed study concludes #MRI

Getty Images

News | Contrast Media Injectors | September 16, 2021
September 16, 2021 — FDB (First Databank), a leading provider of drug and medical device knowledge that helps healthc
Revised guidelines for lung cancer screening eligibility are perpetuating disparities for racial/ethnic minorities, according to a new study in Radiology.

Getty Images

News | Lung Imaging | September 15, 2021
September 15, 2021 — Revised guidelines for...
To get more flexibility and cost savings from storage, healthcare organizations are increasing their investments in the cloud
Feature | Information Technology | September 15, 2021 | By Kumar Goswami
Healthcare organizations today are storing petabytes of medical imaging data — lab slides,...
Figure 1: MWT Schematic of a typical setup for detecting malignant tissues/tumors.

Figure 1: MWT Schematic of a typical setup for detecting malignant tissues/tumors.

Feature | Radiology Imaging | September 14, 2021 | By Brendon McHugh
As with all imaging technologies, COVID-19 is expected to continue to negatively impact the market.

Courtesy of Grand View Research

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 14, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Plan to attend RSNA21 at McCormick Place Chicago, Nov. 28 – Dec. 2, 2021

Getty Images

News | RSNA | September 13, 2021
September 13, 2021 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) today announced highlights of the Technical Exh
New recommendations will help provide more reliable, reproducible results for MRI-based measurements of cartilage degeneration in the knee, helping to slow down disease and prevent progression to irreversible osteoarthritis, according to a special report published in the journal Radiology

Knee cartilage compartments with anatomic labels implemented in lateral (left side), central (middle), and medial (right side) MRI obtained with an intermediate weighted fat-saturated fast-spin-echo sequence (top row) and a spin-lattice relaxation time constant in rotating frame (T1r) magnetization-prepared angle-modulated partitioned k-space spoiled gradient echo snapshots sequence (bottom row, T1r maps). Study was performed without administration of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast material. The lateral femur (LF)/medial femur (MF) and lateral tibia (LT)/medial tibia (MT) can be further divided into subcompartments on the basis of meniscus anatomy according to Eckstein et al. P = patella, T = trochlea.  Chalian et al, Radiology 2021 301; 7 ©RSNA 2021

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 10, 2021
September 10, 2021 — New recommendations will help provide more reliable, reproducible results for...
Neuroscientists at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology carried out comparative studies to determine safe operating conditions for multiband EEG-fMRI imaging while maintaining acceptable data quality standards

A team of psychologists and neuroscientists at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology including Sepideh Sadaghiani, Maximillian Egan, Ryan Larsen, and Brad Sutton published a study to establish safe use of electroencephalography coupled with newly developed functional MRI sequences. Image courtesy of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 07, 2021
September 7, 2021 — A team of psychologists and neuroscientists at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Tec
As the world’s first FDA-cleared bedside MRI system, Hyperfine’s portable Swoop system is designed to allow physicians to rapidly understand the current state of injury to make life-saving decisions.

As the world’s first FDA-cleared bedside MRI system, Hyperfine’s portable Swoop system is designed to allow physicians to rapidly understand the current state of injury to make life-saving decisions. Within minutes, the technology can acquire critical images via a wireless tablet, powered by a standard wall outlet at the patient’s bedside. (Photo: Business Wire)

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 01, 2021
September 1, 2021 — ...