Technology | Lung Imaging | May 09, 2018

Body Vision Medical Receives FDA Clearance for LungVision Tool

Lung navigation catheter part of LungVision Platform for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics and treatment procedures

Body Vision Medical Receives FDA Clearance for LungVision Tool

May 9, 2018 — Body Vision Medical received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market their LungVision Tool. The LungVision Tool is an affordable lung navigation catheter with what the company calls superb maneuverability. It is used in conjunction with standard bronchoscopes and the LungVision System to guide endotherapy accessories to small pulmonary nodules.

This approval clears the way for Body Vision Medical to accelerate commercialization efforts for its LungVision Platform for pulmonary specialists across the U.S., providing an affordable and effective real-time solution for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics and treatment procedures.

The LungVison Imaging and Navigation System was cleared by the FDA in May 2017 and has been successfully used in over 290 clinical procedures in 10 lung cancer centers across the U.S.

"Body Vision has pioneered a new generation platform for navigation bronchoscopy that applies an augmented reality approach to plan, visualize and accurately track radiolucent bronchial nodules in real time," said Krish Bhadra, M.D., from CHI Memorial Hospital, Chattanooga, Tenn. "The LungVision navigation tool has clear performance and cost benefits over current navigation tools that are bound to electromagnetic sensing."

The clinical experience from a multicentral study with the LungVision System will be presented at the American Thoracic Society Conference, May 18-23 in San Diego.

For more information: www.bodyvisionmedical.com

 

Related Content

Brazilian researchers found that the higher the lung ultrasound score the greater the risk of ICU admission, intubation and death. Image courtesy of Julio Alencar

Brazilian researchers found that the higher the lung ultrasound score the greater the risk of ICU admission, intubation and death. Image courtesy of Julio Alencar

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 11, 2021
February 11, 2021 — ...

Chart courtesy of the American Cancer Society

News | Breast Imaging | February 08, 2021
February 8, 2021 — Cancer ranks as a leading cause of death in every country in the world, and, for the first time,
More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

More complex, longer interventional procedures such as structural heart interventions or this revascularization of a coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, requires angiography imaging systems that have improved image detail and lower radiation dose. However, purchase of new systems was put on hold by many hospitals in 2020 due to the sudden drop in elective procedures and diversion of resources due to the COVID-19. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Angiography | January 19, 2021 | By Bhvita Jani
January 19, 2021 – With the postponement of non-essential elective surgeries and medical procedures in 2020 to conser
The GE Healthcare Allia IGS 7 angiography system. #RSNA #RSNA20 #RSNA2020

The GE Healthcare Allia IGS 7 angiography system.

News | Angiography | December 01, 2020
December 3, 2020 — GE Healthcare is introducing a new version of its robotic driven ...
Study conducted by medical AI startup Lunit and Massachusetts General Hospital, published in JAMA Network Open - When used as a second reader, the AI algorithm may help detect lung cancer
News | Artificial Intelligence | November 26, 2020
November 26, 2020 — A recent study published in ...
Minimizing delays to treatment could improve cancer survival rates, say researchers

Getty Images

News | Radiation Oncology | November 10, 2020
November 10, 2020 — People whose treatment for cancer is delayed by even one month have in many cases a 6 to 13% high