News | Radiation Oncology | February 01, 2018

​ITN Celebrates World Cancer Day 2018

World Cancer Day is Feb. 4 and aims to raise the profile of cancer

​ITN Celebrates World Cancer Day 2018

World Cancer Day takes place annually on Feb. 4 to raise awareness and education in the media, governments and people around the world, with an aim to save millions of preventable deaths each year, according to its website. Every year, almost 9 million people die of cancer. Here we have gathered ITN’s coverage of cancer treatments, studies and technological advances. More information can be found on ITN's Radiation Oncology channel page:

 

Radiation Oncology Comparison Charts

Access to these charts requires a login, but it is free and only takes a minute to fill out the form.

Arc-Based Radiotherapy Systems

Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)

Oncology Information Systems (OIS)

Proton Therapy Systems

Radiation Therapy Systems

Treatment Planning Systems

 

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