Sponsored Content | Webinar | Radiation Therapy| October 13, 2017

WEBINAR: Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided Radiation

Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided Radiation Therapy, MRI guided RT.

The webinar "Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided Radiation" was presented by Parag Parikh, BSE, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology and biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, and Percy Lee, M.D., associate professor and vice chair of education for the Department of Radiation Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. They will share their ongoing experience in using MR-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer.

The webinar took place Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017.

View the archived webinar.

This presentation includes highlights of significant outcomes and treatment protocols currently used with their patients. The webinar will compliment the presenters' poster published at ASTRO17, “Higher Maximum Biologic Effective Dose Utilizing Adaptive MRI Guided Radiation Therapy Improves Survival of Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer Patients," which provided a retrospective review of 42 locally-advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated at four institutions:

- Washington University and Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis

- University of California, Los Angeles Health System and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

- University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center in Madison

- VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, Netherlands

The study found that stereotactic dosing regimens guided by MR imaging using the MRIdian system and daily online adaptation had led to significantly prolonged patient survival and resulted in favorably low toxicity.

 

Presenters:

Percy Lee, M.D.Percy Lee, M.D.
Associate Professor Vice Chair, Education Director, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Program
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA , UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dr. Lee is an associate professor and vice chair of education for the Department of Radiation Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Lee is the clinical director of the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program and the chief of service for the thoracic and GI radiation cncology programs in the department. He also serves as the residency training program drector as well as the director for the medical student clerkship. Lee attended the Johns Hopkins University and graduated with the highest honors majoring in biomedical engineering with a concentration in chemical engineering. He attended Harvard Medical School and the Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology Program where he received his M.D., and graduated magna cum laude. At Harvard, he was also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow. He interned at the Massachusetts General Hospital and received specialty training in radiation oncology from Stanford University School of Medicine.

 

Parag Parikh, BSE, M.DParag Parikh, BSE, M.D
BSE Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis 

Parag Parikh, BSE, M.D. is an associate professor of radiation oncology and biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. He serves as the chief of the gastrointestinal radiation oncology service at Washington University School of Medicine – Barnes Jewish Hospital - Siteman Cancer Center. He sees 400 new patients with pancreatic, liver, rectal and anal cancers per year. He has been routinely using MR-guided radiation therapy for three years, and will be coordinating a multicenter trial with UCLA and other institutions that looks at high dose radiation delivered with MR-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer.

 

About ViewRay

ViewRay Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY) designs, manufactures and markets the MRIdian radiation therapy system. MRIdian integrates MRI technology, radiation delivery and proprietary software to locate, target and track the position and shape of soft-tissue tumors during radiation. ViewRay believes this combination of enhanced visualization and accuracy will significantly improve outcomes for patients.

ViewRay and MRIdian are registered trademarks of ViewRay Inc.

 

View the archived webinar.

Related Content

The paradox is that COVID-19 has manifested the critical need for exactly what the rules require: advancement of interoperability and digital online access to clinical data and imaging, at scale, for care coordination and infection control.

The paradox is that COVID-19 has manifested the critical need for exactly what the rules require: advancement of interoperability and digital online access to clinical data and imaging, at scale, for care coordination and infection control. Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020 | By Matthew A. Michela
One year after being proposed, federal rules to advance interoperability in healthcare and create easier access for p
The opportunity to converge the silos of data into a cross-functional analysis can provide immense value during the COVID-19 outbreak and in the future

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 28, 2020 | By Jeff Vachon
In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic normal
Miami Cancer Institute’s Proton Therapy Center is the first in South Florida and the region’s top destination for this leading-edge treatment. Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses pencil beam scanning (PBS) technology.

Miami Cancer Institute’s Proton Therapy Center is the first in South Florida and the region’s top destination for this leading-edge treatment. Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses pencil beam scanning (PBS) technology.

Feature | Proton Therapy | May 27, 2020 | By Minesh Mehta, M.D.
Radiation therapy has advanced significantly in the last few decades as a result of a continued technological revolut
Technology becomes a state-of-the-art tool when it gets exposed to a structure that constantly tests it and allows it to evolve.

Technology becomes a state-of-the-art tool when it gets exposed to a structure that constantly tests it and allows it to evolve. Getty Images

Feature | Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | May 27, 2020 | By Reshu Gupta
In the history of medicine, researchers have found cures for many diseases, but cancer has been elusive.
Off-site imaging companies are playing a key role in the fight against COVID-19
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 26, 2020 | By Sean Zahniser
After the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic has pas
a Schematic of the system. The entire solid tumour is illuminated from four sides by a four-arm fibre bundle. A cylindrically focused linear array is designed to detect optoacoustic signals from the tumour. In vivo imaging is performed in conical scanning geometry by controlling the rotation and translation stages. The sensing part of the transducer array and the tumour are submerged in water to provide acoustic coupling. b Maximum intensity projections of the optoacoustic reconstruction of a phantom of pol

a Schematic of the system. The entire solid tumour is illuminated from four sides by a four-arm fibre bundle. A cylindrically focused linear array is designed to detect optoacoustic signals from the tumour. In vivo imaging is performed in conical scanning geometry by controlling the rotation and translation stages. The sensing part of the transducer array and the tumour are submerged in water to provide acoustic coupling. b Maximum intensity projections of the optoacoustic reconstruction of a phantom of polyethylene microspheres (diameter, 20 μm) dispersed in agar. The inset shows a zoomed-in view of the region boxed with a yellow dashed line. In addition, the yellow boxes are signal profiles along the xy and z axes across the microsphere centre, as well as the corresponding full width at half-maximum values. c Normalized absorption spectra of Hb, HbO2 and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The spectrum for the AuNPs was obtained using a USB4000 spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, FL, USA), while the spectra for Hb and HbO2 were taken from http://omlc.org/spectra/haemoglobin/index.html. The vertical dashed lines indicate the five wavelengths used to stimulate the three absorbers: 710, 750, 780, 810 and 850 nm. Optoacoustic signals were filtered into a low-frequency band (red) and high-frequency band (green), which were used to reconstruct separate images.

News | Breast Imaging | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women.
A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue

A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue. Image courtesy of Xiandoing Xue, UC Davis

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a...