News | April 25, 2013

Toshiba Partners With Leading Universities for Advanced MR Research

Introduces new sequence development environment at ISMRM

April 25, 2013 — Leading research institutions are making breakthroughs in advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with Toshiba America Medical Systems Inc.’s Vantage Titan 3.0T MR system. Toshiba has partnered with Shands at the University of Florida and the Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California (USC) for MR clinical research in functional MRI (fMRI), as well as body and cardiac imaging.

 “We’re utilizing the Titan 3.0T MR to enhance visualization of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) flow non-invasively and in the research of traumatic brain injuries from combat and athletics,” said Anthony Mancuso, professor and chairman of the department of radiology, UF College of Medicine. “The Titan 3.0T fulfills all the promises of a high-end 3.0T system, with high image quality, gradient homogeneity and patient-focused features.”

As part of Toshiba’s commitment to supporting institutions in advanced MR research, Toshiba is demonstrating the new sequence development environment (NSDE), a research-only tool that allows the research community to develop its own pulse sequences to explore new applications of MR imaging.

“Partnering with prestigious universities such as USC and Shands at the University of Florida illustrates our commitment to developing advanced technology that can expand the potential clinical applications of MR imaging,” said Suresh Narayan, senior manager, market development, MR business unit, Toshiba.

Toshiba showcased the Titan 3.0T with NSDE at this year’s International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) annual meeting in Salt Lake City, April 20-26, 2013.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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