News | February 09, 2009

Stroke Therapy Window Might Be Extended For Some, Study Says


February 9, 2009 – Some patients who suffer a stroke as a result of a blockage in an artery in the brain may benefit from a clot-busting drug nine or more hours after the onset of symptoms, according to findings published in the online edition of Radiology.

“Every hour that we can add to the treatment window would allow vastly more stroke patients to be treated with potentially life-saving therapy,” said the study’s lead author, William A. Copen, M.D., director of advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston.

The most common type of stroke is called ischemic stroke. These strokes occur when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel supplying blood to the brain. Some ischemic strokes can be treated with thrombolytic, or clot-busting, therapy using tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), which helps dissolve the blockage. However, the window of opportunity to safely administer the medication is generally considered to be just three hours. Because few patients get to the hospital to be diagnosed and treated within that time frame, fewer than seven percent of patients receive the drug.

In this retrospective study, researchers analyzed the test results of 109 ischemic stroke patients at MGH. The testing methods included two different MRI scanning techniques: perfusion MRI, which measures blood flow in the brain, and diffusion MRI, which measures the movement of water molecules in tissue.

“Comparing the lesions that we see in these two MR images reveals which areas of the brain are threatened by a lack of blood flow, but could still be salvageable,” Dr. Copen said. “A mismatch between the lesions suggests that a patient might still benefit from thrombolytic therapy.”

In the study, most patients with blockage in a proximal artery, close to the base of the brain, continued to demonstrate a diffusion-perfusion mismatch between nine and 24 hours after the onset of their strokes.

“Patients who have a mismatch have been successfully treated up to nine hours after stroke onset, which is already much longer than the guidelines allow, Dr. Copen said. “Our findings suggest a need for a clinical trial to measure the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy more than nine hours after the onset of an ischemic stroke.”

For more information: www.rsna.org

Related Content

ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Contrast Media | August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
GE Healthcare's Signa Premier MRI Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 04, 2017
GE Healthcare announced Signa Premier, a new wide bore 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, is now available...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 31, 2017
Elekta’s magnetic resonance radiation therapy (MR/RT) system will be the subject of 21 abstracts at the 59th American...
NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area

NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area. Image courtesy of David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., University of Florida.

News | Neuro Imaging | July 31, 2017
Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson...
Contrast Media from Bayer, trends in contrast media and developments in contrast media
Feature | Contrast Media | July 28, 2017 | By Dave Fornell
Here are several updates in medical imaging ...
NeuroQuant Software Compatible With Hitachi 1.2T, 1.5T and 3.0T Hitachi MRI Scanners
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 27, 2017
July 27, 2017 — CorTechs Labs recently announced that Hitachi 1.2T Oasis, 1.5T Echelon Oval and 3.0T Trillium Oval...
Overlay Init