News | August 05, 2009

SCCT Announces Winners of Third Annual Young Investigator Award

August 5, 2009 – The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) named Chirapa Puntawangkoon, M.D., and Thananya Boonyasirinant, M.D., the winners of the third annual Young Investigator Award.

Both winners were honored at SCCT’s 2009 Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando, Fla.

“The Young Investigator Award cultivates pioneers, who will ultimately enhance the safety, comfort and effectiveness of diagnostic imaging,” said Daniel S. Berman, M.D., SCCT president. “In today’s economic environment, SCCT’s and Toshiba’s support of this award is all the more critical in finding tomorrow’s medical imaging leaders.”

Dr. Boonyasirinant from the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio won for her submission titled, “Comprehensive Multidetector Computed Tomographic Assessment for Noninvasive Coronary Sinus Imaging and Myocardial Infarction Correlation in Ischemic versus Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Implications for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.”

Dr. Puntawangkoon, from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., was named a winner for her paper titled, “Elliptical Geometry of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract (LVOT) Results in Underestimation of LVOT Area by Echocardiography Compared to Planimetric Measurement by Cardiac Computed Tomography (CCT).”

Five finalists presented their work at the SCCT Annual Scientific Meeting. An independent panel of five editorial advisers reviewed the submitted papers for scientific accuracy, as well as originality, creativity and writing style. Dr. Puntawangkoon and Dr. Boonyasirinant were awarded the Young Investigator Award, which includes a $2,500 cash prize, trophy, an opportunity for priority peer-reviewed publication in the JCC and recognition at a Toshiba-sponsored dinner.

“During my career in diagnostic imaging, I have continually been impressed by the way physicians can see new ways to use imaging equipment, especially CT, to improve protocols and patient care,” said Doug Ryan, senior director, CT business unit, Toshiba. “Toshiba is leading innovation in equipment development, and we believe the industry’s young investigators are the ones who are going to continue to develop new applications that will make significant differences within healthcare.”

Sponsored by Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. through an unrestricted educational grant, the Young Investigator Awards are awarded to two residents or fellows in either radiology or cardiology for their patient care research in the categories of technical and clinical advancement of cardiovascular CT.

For more information: www.scct.org

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