News | Prostate Cancer | August 20, 2015

ScanMed Brings Prostate/Pelvic MRI Coil to the Masses

CEO discusses wearable diagnostic coil on Omaha’s CBS Action News 3

Scanmed, prostate/pelvic MRI coil, Omaha, CBS Action News 3, masses

August 20, 2015 — ScanMed LLC CEO Randall Jones, Ph.D., MBA, introduced the prostate/pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil dedicated to prostate cancer detection on Omaha's CBS Action News 3 segment "The Morning Blend."

The landscape of prostate cancer awareness, detection and diagnosis is rapidly changing. ScanMed introduces solution-based MRI coils to the market as well as provides MRI coil repair, refurbishment, engineering, manufacturing, and online coil commerce services.

Jones saw the opportunity to improve prostate cancer detection in 2011, and dedicated his research and design team to the creation of the Prostate/Pelvic Coil. His main goal was to make affordable, non-invasive diagnostic options available to the masses, as he explained to "The Morning Blend" team Mike DiGiacomo and Mary Nelson.

Jones informed the interviewers that the only technology available has been general torso coils, which don't have enough sensitivity to detect cancers, and the endorectal probe, an invasive coil that has given male patients considerable pause (or denial) when it comes to their diagnostic options. Jones believes that this wearable MRI coil will rapidly change this paradigm.

Jones recommends that patients 40+ years old get their prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, as it can be a valid early-warning indicator. If the PSA indicates anything out of the ordinary, he then recommends looking at procedures like MRI instead of turning immediately to a "blind" biopsy, which produces approximately 50 percent false negative results and can cause damage to the prostate organ.

The key to success is the early detection that the Prostate/Pelvic Coil can provide in conjunction with advanced MRI techniques. Jones points out that in terms of later detection, typically the only treatment option presented is total removal of the organ. This typically results in incontinence, impotence or both.

For more information: www.scanmed.com

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