News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 12, 2016

RSNA Hosts Spotlight Course in Emergency Radiology

Course held in Mexico is first of new initiative to provide regional training around the world

RSNA, regional course, emergency radiology, Mexico

January 12, 2016 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) will offer its first regional course later this year in Mexico. RSNA Spotlight: Radiología de Urgencias: Curso Interactivo con Casos Mexico 2016 will be held June 2-4, 2016, at the Grand Fiesta Americana Coral Beach Cancún Resort & Spa in Cancún, Mexico.

The course launches a new RSNA initiative, providing quality education on important medical imaging issues in different regions. Cancun was selected as the site for the course debut, based on an assessment of the educational needs of RSNA members in Latin America.

During the 2 ½-day program presented entirely in Spanish, participants will explore the use of emergency radiology as part of daily practice. The course will include general and breakout sessions, cases of the day and interactive RSNA Diagnosis Live sessions, and will offer credits for continuing medical education.

“This spotlight course was designed to provide a high-level update on various aspects of one of the fastest growing fields in radiology: emergency imaging,” said Jorge Soto, M.D., from Boston University School of Medicine. “The need for 24-hour onsite coverage or off-site interpretations by well-trained radiologists is now commonplace in emergency centers throughout the world. The format of the course, with small group workshops and lectures with audience response, is well suited to allow the attendees to interact closely with the faculty.”

Presented under the direction of Soto and Guillermo Elizondo Riojas, M.D., Ph.D., from University of Nuevo Leon in Monterrey, Mexico, the course will be taught by renowned leaders in the specialty of radiology. Many of the instructors are from Latin America and will discuss issues of special relevance to the region.

“This course addresses an important and broad topic, with both plenary sessions and small group workshops, using interactive tools and activities,” Riojas said. “The professors are among the best Spanish-speaking lecturers, and the location is ideal.”

For more information: www.rsna.org

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