News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 02, 2017

Quality of MAGiC Brain Scans Non-Inferior to Conventional MRI

Study of multi-contrast MR technique finds synthetically-generated scans are of similar diagnostic quality to conventional scans

Quality of MAGiC Brain Scans Non-Inferior to Conventional MRI

May 2, 2017 — A new study published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR) compares the MAGiC (Magnetic Resonance Image Compilation) software to conventional MRI. MAGiC is a customized version of SyntheticMR’s SyMRI IMAGE software marketed by GE Healthcare under a license agreement. Clinicians from six different sites compared the two methods and verified that the image quality of MAGiC is comparable to conventional images. 

The study, conducted by GE Healthcare and published in the American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR), comprised a set of 1,526 images that were read by seven neuroradiologists comparing synthetic and conventional MR brain images from 109 subjects with neuroimaging indications. The results revealed that the diagnostic quality of the images generated synthetically were non-inferior to conventional imaging.

MAGiC is the industry’s first multi-contrast MR technique cleared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to SyntheticMR. The technique gives clinicians more data than conventional scanning in a substantially shorter time frame. MAGiC gives users the flexibility to adjust the images retrospectively, leading to significant timesaving, fewer rescans and therefore cost savings, which combined, can assist the clinician in making a more decisive diagnosis.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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