Technology | December 13, 2011

Philips CT iDose4 Iterative Reconstruction Nears 500 Sales

December 13, 2011 — Royal Philips Electronics announced that iDose, the latest generation of its iterative reconstruction technique, has nearly 500 sales.

It is a technique that gives radiologists control of the dial so they can personalize image quality depending on clinical needs at low dose. It can be used in combination with the iCT, Ingenuity and Brilliance 64 scanner families.

The system lets radiologists personalize image quality based on each patient’s specific needs. The advanced algorithms provide up to 57 percent improvement in spatial resolution at low dose; the majority of factory protocols are reconstructed in 60 seconds or less.

“We're not just talking about a scan. We're talking about detailed pictures of the coronary arteries being obtained in three seconds noninvasively. That's revolutionary," said Harvey Hecht, M.D., director of cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) at Lenox Hill Hospital.

iDose is easy to use and simple for radiologists to adopt into their existing standard of care. Designed to seamlessly integrate into a CT department, it provides the look and feel of conventional higher-dose images without long processing times.

iDose4 is now available globally for the iCT, Ingenuity CT and Brilliance 64 scanners. It can be integrated into a standard CT department.

Philips will display the iDose4 iterative reconstruction technique in its booths, #7159 and 7721, at RSNA 2011.

For more information: www.philips.com/iDose4

 

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