News | April 07, 2014

New Prostate Cancer Treatment Uses MRI to Guide Ultrasound Ablation

New method could provide an alternative to "watch and wait" or surgery

April 7, 2014 — A new multicenter clinical trial seeks to offer men another option for treating prostate cancer, one that physicians hope will treat cancers with fewer side effects.

As part of that trial, City of Hope in Duarte, Calif., has become the first center in the nation to perform a new procedure using a focused beam of ultrasound energy to “ablate” the prostate cancer. Traditional treatment approaches, such as surgery and radiation, are potentially very effective in treating prostate cancer, but some men are left facing incontinence or impotence. Men with very slow-growing cancers may choose a “watch and wait” approach, monitoring the cancer and determining appropriate interventions if they become necessary.

In this ultrasound ablation technique, the ultrasound is guided by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) technology, allowing the ultrasound to be delivered very precisely to the site of the cancer. The imaging provides real-time thermal feedback, which helps physicians determine at the time of the procedure if enough ultrasound was delivered to the targeted area.

“The potential is that if we could provide a focal therapy that has a much lower risk profile compared to standard therapies, this may potentially be an option for men who choose not to ‘watch and wait,’” said Jeffrey Wong, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at City of Hope and a primary investigator on the trial. “At this time, the treatment is under trial and still being evaluated.”

The technology is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat painful bone metastases, and has been used in other countries to treat prostate cancer.

Jaime Negrette, who lives in Long Beach, was diagnosed with prostate cancer by a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test and sought out an alternative treatment to surgery or radiation. He was treated in mid-November 2013. About six months after treatment, Negrette will know more definitively if the treatment was a success, but so far, he has had no side effects and is doing well.

“I’ve had friends who have been treated for prostate cancer,” he said. “Some men have issues that last long after their prostate was removed, so I was very happy to have another choice.”

The trial includes men with low-risk prostate cancer, with no more than two areas in the prostate gland involved with cancer. The multicenter feasibility trial is ongoing.

For more information: www.cityofhope.org

Related Content

Youth Football Changes Nerve Fibers in Brain

Statistically significant clusters (red-colored) showing group differences (Control vs. Football) in white matter strain along the primary (F1) and secondary (F2) fibers. While body of corpus callosum (BBC) showed relative shrinkage in Football group, the other clusters showed relative stretching of fibers. PCR: Posterior Corona Radiata, PLIC: Posterior Limb of Internal Capsule, SCR: Superior Corona Radiata, SLF: Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus, SCC: Splenium of Corpus Callosum. Image courtesy of Kim et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts Magnetom Altea 1.5T MRI Scanner
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 06, 2018
During the 104th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30...
GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | December 05, 2018
GE Healthcare recently announced new applications and smart devices built on Edison – a platform that helps accelerate...
Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
News | Women's Health | November 29, 2018
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring may lead to earlier impairment of cardiac function in women than in men,...
Vital Showcases Enterprise Imaging Advances at RSNA 2018

Global Illumination from Vital Images

News | Enterprise Imaging | November 28, 2018
Vital, a Canon Group company, will highlight the latest additions to its enterprise imaging portfolio at the 2018...
Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRI

Example of full-dose, 10 percent low-dose and algorithm-enhanced low-dose. Image courtesy of Enhao Gong, Ph.D.

News | Contrast Media | November 27, 2018
Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to reduce the dose of a contrast agent that may be left behind in...
Arterys Demonstrates AI Cloud-Based Medical Image Analysis Solutions at RSNA 2018
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | November 26, 2018
Medical imaging software company Arterys will demonstrate its wide-ranging suite of artificial intelligence (AI)-...
HeartVista Announces One Click Autonomous MRI Solution
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | November 25, 2018
HeartVista announced its artificial intelligence (AI)-driven, One-Click Autonomous MRI acquisition software for cardiac...
Siemens Healthineers Showcases syngo Virtual Cockpit for More Flexible Workforce Management
News | Teleradiology | November 25, 2018
During the 104th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 25-30...