News | April 07, 2014

New Prostate Cancer Treatment Uses MRI to Guide Ultrasound Ablation

New method could provide an alternative to "watch and wait" or surgery

April 7, 2014 — A new multicenter clinical trial seeks to offer men another option for treating prostate cancer, one that physicians hope will treat cancers with fewer side effects.

As part of that trial, City of Hope in Duarte, Calif., has become the first center in the nation to perform a new procedure using a focused beam of ultrasound energy to “ablate” the prostate cancer. Traditional treatment approaches, such as surgery and radiation, are potentially very effective in treating prostate cancer, but some men are left facing incontinence or impotence. Men with very slow-growing cancers may choose a “watch and wait” approach, monitoring the cancer and determining appropriate interventions if they become necessary.

In this ultrasound ablation technique, the ultrasound is guided by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) technology, allowing the ultrasound to be delivered very precisely to the site of the cancer. The imaging provides real-time thermal feedback, which helps physicians determine at the time of the procedure if enough ultrasound was delivered to the targeted area.

“The potential is that if we could provide a focal therapy that has a much lower risk profile compared to standard therapies, this may potentially be an option for men who choose not to ‘watch and wait,’” said Jeffrey Wong, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at City of Hope and a primary investigator on the trial. “At this time, the treatment is under trial and still being evaluated.”

The technology is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat painful bone metastases, and has been used in other countries to treat prostate cancer.

Jaime Negrette, who lives in Long Beach, was diagnosed with prostate cancer by a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test and sought out an alternative treatment to surgery or radiation. He was treated in mid-November 2013. About six months after treatment, Negrette will know more definitively if the treatment was a success, but so far, he has had no side effects and is doing well.

“I’ve had friends who have been treated for prostate cancer,” he said. “Some men have issues that last long after their prostate was removed, so I was very happy to have another choice.”

The trial includes men with low-risk prostate cancer, with no more than two areas in the prostate gland involved with cancer. The multicenter feasibility trial is ongoing.

For more information: www.cityofhope.org

Related Content

Houston Methodist Hospital Enters Multi-Year Technology and Research Agreement With Siemens Healthineers
News | Imaging | August 17, 2017
Houston Methodist Hospital and Siemens Healthineers have entered into a multi-year agreement to bring cutting-edge...
Carestream Launches MR Brain Perfusion and Diffusion Modules for Vue PACS
Technology | Advanced Visualization | August 16, 2017
Carestream Health recently introduced new MR (magnetic resonance) Brain Perfusion and MR Brain Diffusion modules that...
Study Demonstrates First Human Application of Novel PET Tracer for Prostate Cancer

Transaxial 11Csarcosine hybrid PET/CT showed a (triangulated) adenocarcinoma in the transition zone of the anterior right prostate gland on PET (A), CT (B), and a separately obtained T2?weighted MR sequence (C) with resulting PET/MRI registration (D). Image courtesy of M. Piert et al., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 16, 2017
In the featured translational article in the August issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers at the...
ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Contrast Media | August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
GE Healthcare's Signa Premier MRI Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance
Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 04, 2017
GE Healthcare announced Signa Premier, a new wide bore 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, is now available...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 31, 2017
Elekta’s magnetic resonance radiation therapy (MR/RT) system will be the subject of 21 abstracts at the 59th American...
Overlay Init