News | Interventional Radiology | August 03, 2017

Moffitt Cancer Center Enhances Patient Care with Toshiba Medical's Infinix-i 4-D

System combines interventional radiology and CT to streamline workflow so clinicians can offer faster and safer exams to more patients

Moffitt Cancer Center Enhances Patient Care with Toshiba Medical's Infinix-i 4-D

August 3, 2017 — Cancer patients at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., now have access to advanced diagnostic imaging for fast and safe exams with the facility’s Infinix-i 4-D computed tomography (CT) system from Toshiba Medical, a Canon Group company. Moffitt, one of the nation’s leading cancer hospitals, is the first healthcare provider in the state of Florida to use the system’s merging of the Infinix-i angiography system and Aquilion Prime CT system for interventional radiology (IR) and oncology procedures. The system may help clinicians improve visualization and workflow and increase patient safety. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on July 25 to mark the occasion.

Moffitt is using the Infinix-i 4D CT for a variety of IR and oncology procedures to more efficiently plan, treat and verify in a single clinical setting. The system’s seamless integration of the interventional lab and CT scanner can transform workflow, eliminating the need to transfer patients between departments, decreasing procedure time and maintaining patient safety.

“Time is critical when treating cancer patients, and we acquired the Infinix-i 4-D CT to help us provide faster and safer care to more patients,” said Grace Cabral, patient care manager of interventional radiology at Moffitt. “With the new system we can capture high-quality images more quickly than before without having to transfer patients between machines, which has allowed us to double our embolization case load and significantly reduce wait times for ablations and biopsies. Additionally, the system’s small footprint allowed us to install the Infinix-i 4D CT quickly, with little downtime for construction, so we could begin utilizing it with patients right away.”

The Infinix-i enables clinicians to provide precision and flexibility during intervention with fingertip-to-fingertip and head-to-toe coverage and enables improved patient access with the Access Halo. As a true CT system, the Aquilion PRIME produces image quality that far exceeds CT-like imaging of the interventional lab, according to Toshiba. The company’s third-generation iterative dose reconstruction software, AIDR (Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction) 3-D Enhanced, offers simplified CT dose reduction, while the Infinix-i has a suite of dose management features including the Dose Tracking System.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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