News | February 19, 2008

Mobile Anesthesiologists Announces Spin-Off of its Procurement Operation

February 20, 2008 – Mobile Anesthesiologists Holdings LLC (Mobile) has announced the spin-off of its procurement operation into an independently operating company to be known as Pro Cure LLC, a company that will provide a full spectrum of procurement services to the rapidly growing ‘alternate-site’ market comprised of office-based practices as well as smaller chain and independent ASCs.

The alternate site market is the fastest growing segment in healthcare as an increasing number of surgical and diagnostic procedures are being migrated from hospitals, said the company. According to the SMG Group, in 2007 25 percent of all surgical/diagnostic procedures were performed in the office-based setting and it is projected that over 50 percent of all procedures will be migrated by 2010. Fueling this exponential growth is the fact that the delivery of medical care at alternate sites, specifically ambulatory surgery centers and physicians offices is as safe or safer than the hospital setting but significantly less expensive, according to the company.

Pro Cure has reportedly built its business model around this cost disparity. Pro Cure aims to provider independent healthcare provider organizations the same benefit from the pricing advantages enjoyed by hospitals and corporate chains.

In late 2007, Mobile began offering its internal procurement resources to outside clients saving them as much as 60 percent on anesthesia specific drugs and up to 30 percent on average on their overall procurement portfolio, said the company.

On Feb. 19, Pro Cure, officially started to operate independently of Mobile Anesthesiologists with Scott C. Mayer as president and Richard J. Harris as executive chairman.

For more information: www.pro-curemed.com

Related Content

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at ...
360 Photos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
This is a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI system installed at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas.
Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute Implements Philips Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MRI
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute announced the implementation of Philips’ Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR, the world’s...
Managing Architectural Distortion on Mammography Based on MR Enhancement
News | Mammography | May 15, 2019
High negative predictive values (NPV) in mammography architectural distortion (AD) without ultrasonographic (US)...
Netherlands Hospital to Install State-of-the-Art MRI Ablation Center
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 13, 2019
Imricor announced the signing of a commercial agreement with the Haga Hospital in The Hague, Netherlands to outfit a...
Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients
News | MRI Breast | May 09, 2019
When appropriate, short-interval follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify early-stage breast...
Clinical Trial Explores Opening Blood-Brain Barrier in Fight Against Alzheimer's

Vibhor Krishna, M.D., (right) fits David Shorr with a helmet-like device used in a new clinical trial for Alzheimer’s disease at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The device uses MRI-guided imaging to deliver focused ultrasound to specific areas of the brain to open the blood-brain barrier. Image courtesy of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | May 09, 2019
May 9, 2019 — A new clinical trial at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and two other sites is testing