News | March 09, 2010

MIT Researchers to Use MEG for Neurological Studies

Elekta's Neuromag system for magnetoencephalography.

March 9, 2010 - Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will use a new magnetoencephalography (MEG) to explore brain function, including normal cognition in children and adults, as well as the neural basis of autism, depression, schizophrenia, and other brain disorders.

MEG can detect the very weak magnetic fields arising from electrical activity in the brain, and allows researchers to monitor the timing of brain activity with millisecond precision. MIT, a leading centers for neuroscience research, will use the Elekta Neuromag to study the brain at the molecular and cellular level to human cognition and computational modeling.

The Elekta Neuromag system will be housed in the Martinos Imaging Center within the Brain and Cognitive Sciences complex, home to the McGovern Institute of Brain Research, the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Delivery of the system is expected in June and is expected to be operational by the fall of 2010.

Professor John Gabrieli, director of the Martinos Imaging Center, said he intends to use MEG to study the neural and genetic basis of autism, dyslexia and other developmental disorders. By combining MEG with other brain imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG), Dr. Gabrieli plans to search for differences in brain activation in subjects with different genetic variants that have been linked to these conditions. “Our goal is to correlate the changes in brain function with genetic risk factors, and in turn identify categories of patients for whom optimal treatment strategies could be tailored,” he said.

The Director of the McGovern Institute Professor Robert Desimone will study the neural basis of attention. Animal studies have indicated that high-frequency brain waves known as gamma oscillations become synchronized across brain areas as these areas communicate with each other to control attention. Extending this work to humans using MEG to study as schizophrenia, Desimone will examine how gamma oscillations are disrupted in schizophrenia, which may help explain why people with schizophrenia often experience difficulty organizing their thoughts and perceptions into a coherent and meaningful whole.

Professor Christopher Moore, an investigator at the McGovern Institute, will use the system to investigate how the cerebral cortex processes rapid sensory information. Based on his work on cortical circuitry, Moore has developed a biophysical model to account for the MEG signal. “Our aim is to link the signals that we can record from human subjects to the underlying brain mechanisms that give rise to those signals,” he said.

For more information: web.mit.edu/mitmri, mcgovern.mit.edu and www.elekta.com

Related Content

360 Photos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
This is a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI system installed at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas.
Miami Cardiac and Vascular Institute Implements Philips Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MRI
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute announced the implementation of Philips’ Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR, the world’s...
Managing Architectural Distortion on Mammography Based on MR Enhancement
News | Mammography | May 15, 2019
High negative predictive values (NPV) in mammography architectural distortion (AD) without ultrasonographic (US)...
Netherlands Hospital to Install State-of-the-Art MRI Ablation Center
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 13, 2019
Imricor announced the signing of a commercial agreement with the Haga Hospital in The Hague, Netherlands to outfit a...
Screening MRI Detects BI-RADS 3 Breast Cancer in High-risk Patients
News | MRI Breast | May 09, 2019
When appropriate, short-interval follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify early-stage breast...
Clinical Trial Explores Opening Blood-Brain Barrier in Fight Against Alzheimer's

Vibhor Krishna, M.D., (right) fits David Shorr with a helmet-like device used in a new clinical trial for Alzheimer’s disease at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The device uses MRI-guided imaging to deliver focused ultrasound to specific areas of the brain to open the blood-brain barrier. Image courtesy of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | May 09, 2019
May 9, 2019 — A new clinical trial at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and two other sites is testing
New Guideline Published for Evaluation of Valvular Regurgitation After Catheter-based Valve Interventions
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | April 30, 2019
A new document compiled by four cardiac imaging professional societies provides a resource to guide clinicians in best...
Women With Coronary Artery Wall Thickness at Risk for Heart Disease
News | Cardiac Imaging | April 25, 2019
The thickness of the coronary artery wall as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an independent marker for...
Philips Unveils IntelliSpace Radiation Oncology at ESTRO 2019
News | Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | April 25, 2019
Philips announced IntelliSpace Radiation Oncology, an intelligent patient management solution to manage complexity,...