News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 28, 2016

MD Anderson Cancer Center Adopts BodyTom CT Scanner for Proton Therapy

Portable 32-slice scanner provides diagnostic-quality images for tumor-site checking

Samsung, Neurologica, BodyTom portable CT scanner, MD Anderson Cancer Center

September 28, 2016 — Samsung announced recently that The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston added BodyTom CT, the world’s first portable, full-body, 32-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner to its Proton Therapy Center. The center is now treating patients using images from the scanner as part of the process.

Sometimes tumors shift locations or change in size from the time treatment is planned to when it is administered. Using a portable CT to confirm a tumor’s location and size before each treatment session can ensure the most accurate delivery of proton therapy. Building on the use of CT imaging in the proton therapy treatment planning process, MD Anderson is now using BodyTom’s diagnostic-quality imaging daily for tumor-site checking, said Steven J. Frank M.D., medical director of MD Anderson’s Proton Therapy Center.

“Proton therapy is among the best cancer-fighting tools we have, and we are taking advantage of the newest technology available with the hopes of improving patient outcomes,” Frank said. “By incorporating three-dimensional imaging guidance into our treatment process, we aim to enhance the accuracy of proton therapy. Knowing the tumor’s exact location each time we treat a patient ensures radiation is deposited directly to the tumor while sparing adjacent, healthy tissue.”

BodyTom is a self-shielded, multi-departmental imaging solution capable of transforming any room in the hospital into an advanced imaging suite. The system features an 85cm gantry and a 60cm field of view, the largest field of view available in a portable CT scanner, according to Samsung. Designed to accommodate patients of all sizes, BodyTom provides point-of-care imaging wherever high-quality CT images are needed, including the operating room, intensive care unit, oncology treatment facilities and the emergency department. The combination of rapid scan time, flexible settings and immediate image viewing makes the BodyTom a valuable tool to any facility needing versatile real-time portable imaging.

Proton therapy is similar to traditional radiation therapy, but proton beams enter the body with a low dose of radiation, increasing as it approaches the target area and deposits its maximum radiation directly in tumors without traveling beyond them. This means tumors can be targeted precisely, usually within one millimeter, allowing for the delivery of a powerful dose of radiation.

The BodyTom portable CT scanner is designed to help medical physicists and radiation oncologists map out a course of treatment at the point of care, in real time. Clinical studies have shown BodyTom CT to be a safe, highly precise tool for aiding the insertion of implants in anatomically complex procedures such as spinal surgery, enhancing outcomes.

For more information: www.neurologica.com

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