Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 24, 2017

Esaote Launches Q-Spine Analysis Software

Software for Brio G MRI scanner allows enhanced numerical analysis of weight-bearing versus recumbent spinal MRI exams

Esaote Launches Q-Spine Analysis Software

October 24, 2017 — Esaote will launch Q-Spine, a technology that provides biometrics of the spine, at the North America Spine Society (NASS) annual meeting, Oct. 25–28 in Orlando, Fla. Q-Spine is a software tool to assist spine surgeons, orthopedists and chiropractors in their planning therapy and surgical procedures by means of visualization and quantification of relative biomechanical changes between weight-bearing and recumbent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lumbar spine examination.

Also at NASS 2017, Richard D. Guyer, M.D., from the Texas Back Institute will present an abstract titled on Q-Spine titled “Q-Spine: New MRI-Based Quantification Method for L-Spine Analysis,” during the Innovative Technology Presentations.

Q-Spine facilitates and simplifies the analysis of weight-bearing versus recumbent MRI through semi-automatic segmentation of the Lumbar-spine. The system provides a numerical quantification of the relative changes, establishing reliable and coherent measures by taking out the “human factor.” It provides the ability to evaluate patient follow-up with numerical evidence, and generates a PDF report to be attached to the medical report

Guyer stated, “We are excited to present the Q-Spine software, which is a semi-automated software analysis used with the Esaote weight-bearing Brio G MRI scanner, which reliably calculates spinal canal area, dural diameter, lumbar lordosis and sacral angles. We believe this will demonstrate nerve compression which may not be diagnosed with supine MRI scanners and help surgeons manage sagittal alignment in their patients.”

Q-Spine is available on Esaote’s G-Scan Brio, a dedicated MRI system featuring a comprehensive set of coils and sequences to provide complete musculoskeletal (MSK) MRI, from spine to extremities — plus the ability to perform unique weight-bearing studies.

For more information: www.esaote.com

Related Content

Imaging volumes in hospitals and practices previously slowed by the coronavirus pandemic continue to hold steady, according to new QuickPoLL survey results that gauge how radiologists feel about current business and the impact of COVID-19.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | August 03, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Imaging volumes in hospitals and practices previously slowed by the coronavirus pandemic continue to hold steady, acc
Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

Franco Fontana, CEO of the Esaote Group, and Xie Yufeng, Chairman of WDM.

News | Digital Radiography (DR) | July 31, 2020
July 31, 2020 — In the thick of the COVID-19 eme
It covers every major modality, including breast imaging/mammography, fixed and portable C-arms (cath, IR/angio, hybrid, OR), CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, radiographic fluoroscopy, ultrasound and X-ray
News | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2020
July 29, 2020 — IMV Medical Information, part of Scien...
Pioneering study, which included humans, led by Tel Aviv University researchers contradicts widespread conjectures
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 21, 2020
July 21, 2020 — Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof.

Fig. 1 The basis of high-sensitivity SPION imaging at ultra-low magnetic fields.

(A) Magnetization of 25-nm SPIONs (green), gadolinium CA (Gd-DTPA/Magnevist, blue), and water (red) as a function of magnetic field strength (B0). (B) Magnetization as a function of magnetic field strength (B0) in the ULF (<10 mT) regime for the materials shown in (A). Superparamagnetic materials, such as SPIONs, are highly magnetized even at ULF. Paramagnetic materials, such as CAs based on gadolinium, and body tissues (which typically have diamagnetic susceptibilities close to water) have absolute magnetizations that increase linearly with field strength. Curves in (A) and (B) were reproduced from data in (3253) and reflect the magnetic moment per kilogram of compound. (C) Highly magnetized SPIONs (brown) interact with nearby 1H spins in water, shortening 1H relaxation times, and causing susceptibility-based shifts in Larmor frequency. Image courtesy of Science Advances

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 20, 2020
July 20, 2020 — Lowering the cost of magne...
This data represents wave 3 of a QuickPoLL survey conducted in partnership with an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 15, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
 Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unresponsive after surviving critical illness. Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) now describe a patient with severe COVID-19 who, despite prolonged unresponsiveness and structural brain abnormalities, demonstrated functionally intact brain connections and weeks later he recovered the ability to follow commands

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 08, 2020
July 8, 2020 — Many patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (...
A patient implanted with the Axonics System can undergo MRI examinations safely with radio frequency (RF) Transmit Body or Head Coil under the conditions outlined in the Axonics MRI Conditional Guidelines.

A patient implanted with the Axonics System can undergo MRI examinations safely with radio frequency (RF) Transmit Body or Head Coil under the conditions outlined in the Axonics MRI Conditional Guidelines.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 02, 2020
July 2, 2020 — Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc., a medical technology company that has developed and is commerci
This data represents wave 2 of a QuickPoLL survey conducted in partnership with an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 01, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane