News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | August 07, 2017

Early Clinical Experience with ViewRay's MRIdian Linac Presented at AAPM 2017

Talks highlight clinical value of MRIdian on-table adaptive therapy for escalating target dose and avoiding nearby organs at risk

August 7, 2017 — ViewRay Inc. announced that several presentations of early clinical experience with its MRIdian Linac technology were made at the 2017 annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), July 30-Aug. 2 in Denver. MRIdian Linac is the world’s only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy system with linear accelerator-based delivery, according to the company.

The company's MRIdian System was the focus of 30 abstracts selected by AAPM, including several talks describing the significant advantages of daily on-table adaptive radiation therapy and its positive clinical impact on treatment. MR-guided on-table adaptive therapy allows for dose escalation for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments and dose de-escalation in cases where the critical structures are too close to the tumor. 

The AAPM Scientific Session talks also highlighted MRIdian's fully integrated workflow for adaptive therapy, which incorporates complete Monte Carlo dose replanning to account for changes in the shape and position of the tumor and adjacent organs in less than two minutes.

ViewRay featured a number of presentations in the company's booth given by MRIdian users from five top cancer centers: Henry Ford Health System in Metro Detroit; University of California, Los Angeles; Washington University in St. Louis; University of Wisconsin; and University of Miami.

Highlights from these talks included:

  • Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., from Henry Ford presented on their initial patient experience with MRIdian Linac including treatment times of 6.25 minutes for 8Gy SBRT treatments and 5 minutes for prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments. She also showed MRIdian movies on how the system's real-time imaging during treatment automatically detected and paused the treatment when a transient gas bubble shifted the prostate. Additional patients in the queue for Henry Ford include liver SBRT, retroperitoneal SBRT and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). "MRIdian really does take the blindfold off in showing us things we've never seen before," said Glide-Hurst. "We're now able to treat indications that we hadn't really treated previously like APBI. We're excited about the potential of reducing margins and getting a conformal delivery with MRI guidance";
  • Anthony Doemer, M.S., from Henry Ford highlighted the ultra-sharp beam characteristics for the RayZR Double focused multileaf collimator (MLC). Because of its design, it removes the need for tongue and grooves, nearly eliminating any leakage through the leaves (average leakage, less than 0.001 percent). "We were able to successfully commission the MLC with great agreement between measured small beam profiles of 0.2 x 0.4 cm and larger profiles matching very well with the Monte Carlo simulations with tight conformance to the beam model," said Doemer;
  • Yingli Yang, Ph.D., from UCLA presented on MRIdian's high-quality MRI images, specifically the superior soft-tissue image quality enabled by MRIdian's processing techniques. Yang also highlighted early research imaging results acquired using a new MR acquisition technique reducing the imaging times of 17 seconds down to approximately 12 seconds. This 3-D MRI sequence provides motion artifact-free images with a large field of view (FOV) for short breath hold. She also presented research on a 3-D MRI acquisition scheme that is insensitive to motion and will enable free breathing MRI for patients who are unable to hold their breath;
  • Vivian Rodriguez, Ph.D., from Washington University shared their extensive experience with on-table adaptive therapy, illustrating the significant anatomical changes that can take place within a short period of time and highlighting case examples where the treatment plan was reoptimized to escalate or de-escalate dose based upon the proximity of nearby critical structures while the patient was on the treatment table. "With a single button click we can replan within a minute a new treatment plan that reduces dose to organs at risk while giving a greater dose to the target," said Rodriguez; and
  • Kathryn Mittauer, Ph.D., from the University of Wisconsin shared their experience personalizing patient treatments through daily dose-guided radiotherapy using online recalculation and evaluation of the actual dose distribution. "We're able to deliver higher doses to targets adjacent to organs at risk due to improved confidence in treatment set up and delivery that would not otherwise be clinically feasible," said Mittauer.

For more information: www.viewray.com

 

Related Articles on MRI-guided Radiation Therapy:

MRI-guided Radiation Therapy (2017)

First Patients Treated with ViewRay's MRIdian Linac at Henry Ford Health System

Elekta Begins MR-Linac Installation at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy (2016)

MRI Brings New Vision to Radiation Therapy

Dutch Medical Center Begins Installation of World's First High-field MRI-guided Radiation Therapy System

Related Content

The development of new research guidelines for interventional oncology that standardize treatment outcomes and the reporting of data represents a major step forward for an increasingly important medical subspecialty, according to a report in Radiology.

Getty Images

News | Radiation Oncology | September 21, 2021
September 21, 2021 — The development of new research guidelines for interventional oncology that standardize treatmen
An illustration based on simulations by Rice University engineers shows a gadolinium ion (blue) in water (red and white), with inner-sphere water -- the water most affected by the gadolinium -- highlighted. The researchers’ models of gadolinium in water show there’s room for improvement in compounds used as contrast agents in clinical magnetic resonance imaging.

An illustration based on simulations by Rice University engineers shows a gadolinium ion (blue) in water (red and white), with inner-sphere water -- the water most affected by the gadolinium -- highlighted. The researchers’ models of gadolinium in water show there’s room for improvement in compounds used as contrast agents in clinical magnetic resonance imaging. Illustration by Arjun Valiya Parambathu

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 20, 2021
September 20, 2021 — ...
Non-oncology doctors’ knowledge of oncology is frequently not up to date, with risks in the communication with patients  

Getty Images

News | Radiation Oncology | September 20, 2021
September 20, 2021 — The rapid pace of developments in the oncology field, mainly brought by cancer immunotherapy, me
IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A., EURONEXT), a world leader in particle accelerator technology, and SCK CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Center) announced a strategic R&D partnership to enable the production of Actinimum-225 (225Ac), a novel radioisotope which has significant potential in the treatment of cancer.
News | Radiation Oncology | September 17, 2021
September 17, 2021 — IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A., EURONEXT), a world leader in particle accelerator technology, a
Avoiding contrast dyes for imaging tests not necessary if concerned about iodine allergy, peer-reviewed study concludes #MRI

Getty Images

News | Contrast Media Injectors | September 16, 2021
September 16, 2021 — FDB (First Databank), a leading provider of drug and medical device knowledge that helps healthc
Revised guidelines for lung cancer screening eligibility are perpetuating disparities for racial/ethnic minorities, according to a new study in Radiology.

Getty Images

News | Lung Imaging | September 15, 2021
September 15, 2021 — Revised guidelines for...
To get more flexibility and cost savings from storage, healthcare organizations are increasing their investments in the cloud
Feature | Information Technology | September 15, 2021 | By Kumar Goswami
Healthcare organizations today are storing petabytes of medical imaging data — lab slides,...
Figure 1: MWT Schematic of a typical setup for detecting malignant tissues/tumors.

Figure 1: MWT Schematic of a typical setup for detecting malignant tissues/tumors.

Feature | Radiology Imaging | September 14, 2021 | By Brendon McHugh
As with all imaging technologies, COVID-19 is expected to continue to negatively impact the market.

Courtesy of Grand View Research

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 14, 2021 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane