News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 25, 2017

First Patients Treated with ViewRay's MRIdian Linac at Henry Ford Health System

FDA-cleared MRI-guided linear accelerator-based radiation therapy system allows real-time tumor tracking to enhance patient care

July 25, 2017 — ViewRay Inc. announced recently that the first cancer patients have been treated using the company's MRIdian Linac system at Henry Ford Health System in Metro Detroit. MRIdian Linac is the world's only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy system with linear accelerator-based delivery. MRIdian Linac is the company's second-generation system.

"MRIdian offers us the ability to finally see where the patient's tumor is located in real time using MRI imaging so we know what changes are taking place inside the body and can make the necessary adjustments in real time," said Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at the Henry Ford Cancer Institute, part of Henry Ford Health System. "This precision radiation enables us to target our therapy to each and every patient individually. I believe this is going to change how we use radiation to treat cancer."

Of particular interest to the clinicians at Henry Ford Health System are the MRIdian Linac system's on-table adaptive capabilities, which include the ability to reshape the radiation to match changes in the patient's anatomy between treatments.

Read an article from the July 2017 issue of ITN on MRI-guided radiation therapy.

For more information: www.viewray.com

Related Content

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire)

AIR Recon DL delivers shorter scans and better image quality (Photo: Business Wire).

News | Artificial Intelligence | May 29, 2020
May 29, 2020 — GE Healthcare announced U.S.
United Imaging's uMR OMEGA is designed to provide greater access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the world’s first ultra-wide 75-cm bore 3T MRI.
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 27, 2020
May 27, 2020 — United Imaging's...
Technology becomes a state-of-the-art tool when it gets exposed to a structure that constantly tests it and allows it to evolve.

Technology becomes a state-of-the-art tool when it gets exposed to a structure that constantly tests it and allows it to evolve. Getty Images

Feature | Oncology Information Management Systems (OIMS) | May 27, 2020 | By Reshu Gupta
In the history of medicine, researchers have found cures for many diseases, but cancer has been elusive.
Miami Cancer Institute’s Proton Therapy Center is the first in South Florida and the region’s top destination for this leading-edge treatment. Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses pencil beam scanning (PBS) technology.

Miami Cancer Institute’s Proton Therapy Center is the first in South Florida and the region’s top destination for this leading-edge treatment. Proton therapy is an advanced form of radiation therapy that uses pencil beam scanning (PBS) technology.

Feature | Proton Therapy | May 27, 2020 | By Minesh Mehta, M.D.
Radiation therapy has advanced significantly in the last few decades as a result of a continued technological revolut
A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue

A new technique developed by researchers at UC Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The team created a probe that generates two magnetic resonance signals that suppress each other until they reach the target, at which point they both increase contrast between the tumor and surrounding tissue. Image courtesy of Xiandoing Xue, UC Davis

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a...
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo. Gadolinium is contained in contrast agents given to patients undergoing medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and it has been shown in labs to become toxic when exposed to ultraviolet rays. The researchers found significantly elevated levels, particularly near water treatment plants, highlighting the need for new public policy and removal technologies as MRI become even more commonp

Samples were taken along rivers around Tokyo. Measurements of rare earth element quantities indicate a clearly elevated amount of gadolinium compared to that in natural shale. Graphics courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan...
Despite facing challenges such as limited access to personal protective equipment (PPE) following the COVID-19 outbreak, radiation oncology clinics quickly implemented safety and process enhancements that allowed them to continue caring for cancer patients, according to a new national survey from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Getty Images

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | May 21, 2020
May 21, 2020 — Despite facing challenges such as limited access to...
The global radiation therapy market is expected to reach $10.11 billion in 2024, witnessing growth at a CAGR of 3.38%, over the period 2020-2024.
News | Proton Therapy | May 20, 2020
May 20, 2020 — ResearchAndMarkets.com has released its latest report, the ...
Advanced imaging data exchange is now live in Colorado due to the partnership of Health Images and the Colorado Regional Health Information Organization

Getty Images

News | Radiology Business | May 18, 2020
May 18, 2020 —