News | December 16, 2009

CT Radiation May Contribute to Cancer Risk Says Study

December 15, 2009 - Computed tomography (CT) scan use may make large contributions to the total cancer risk, and risk-reduction efforts may be warranted, according to an article published in the December 2009 issue of The Archives of Internal Medicine.1

According to researchers, the use of CT scans in the United States has increased more than three-fold since 1993 to approximately 70 million scans annually. This fact has prompted concern about the potential radiation-related cancer risk, despite the great medical benefits from this diagnostic tool.

Researchers estimated that approximately 29,000 (95 percent UL) future cancers could be related to CT scans performed in the United States in 2007. The largest contributions were from scans of the abdomen and pelvis (n = 14 000) (95 percent UL), chest (n = 4100) (95 percent UL), and head (n = 4000) (95percent UL), as well as from chest CT angiography (n = 2700) (95 percent UL). One-third of the projected cancers were due to scans performed at the ages of 35 to 54 years compared with 15 percent due to scans performed at ages younger than 18 years, and 66 percent were in females.

The study concluded: "These detailed estimates highlight several areas of CT scan use that make large contributions to the total cancer risk, including several scan types and age groups with a high frequency of use or scans involving relatively high doses, in which risk-reduction efforts may be warranted."3

1. Berrington de González A, Mahesh M, Kim K-P; et al. Projected cancer risks from computed tomographic scans performed in the United States in 2007. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(22):2071-2077.
2. Ibid.
3.Ibid.

Related Content

Videos | RSNA | April 03, 2019
ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displa
Johns Hopkins Medicine First in U.S. to Install Canon Medical's Aquilion Precision
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 26, 2019
March 26, 2019 — Johns Hopkins Medicine now has access to the first...
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of...
Researchers Use Radiomics to Predict Who Will Benefit from Chemotherapy
News | Radiomics | March 21, 2019
Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will...
HeartFlow Analysis Successfully Stratifies Heart Disease Patients at One Year
News | CT Angiography (CTA) | March 19, 2019
Late-breaking results confirm the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis enables...
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Canon Medical Introduces Entry-Level Aquilion Start CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 14, 2019
Canon Medical Systems Europe B.V. introduced the all-new Aquilion Start computed tomography (CT) system to the European...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts Cardiovascular Edition of Somatom go.Top CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 14, 2019
Siemens Healthineers will introduce the Somatom go.Top Cardiovascular Edition, a new version of its established...
CT, Mammograms Offer Clues to Preventing Heart Problems After Cancer Treatment
News | Cardio-oncology | March 13, 2019
An imaging procedure commonly performed before starting cancer treatment can provide valuable clues about a patient's...
Aidoc Announces CE Mark for AI-based Pulmonary Embolism Workflow Tool
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 04, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) radiology solution provider Aidoc announced the commercial release of its CE-marked...