News | Cardiac Imaging | June 08, 2016

Cardiac MRI Predicts Future Heart Failure

Detection of heart muscle bleeds may allow doctors to identify and treat those at risk

heart failure, muscle bleeding, British Cardiovascular Conference, MRI

June 8, 2016 — The amount a heart ‘bleeds’ following a heart attack can predict the severity of future heart failure, according to research presented at the British Cardiovascular Conference in Manchester, England.

Bleeding, or bruising in the heart, affects over 40 percent of people who suffer from a heart attack. The researchers have now found that this injury is associated with a higher risk of developing heart failure in the months following a heart attack.

There are 188,000 hospital episodes attributed to heart attack in the United Kingdom each year — around one every three minutes. But although around 7 out of 10 people now survive a heart attack, many are left with heart failure.

The British Heart Foundation-funded study found that bleeding was linked to a 2.6 times greater risk of adverse remodeling, where the heart muscle changes shape, which is a precursor to heart failure. It is also linked to a six times greater risk of either death or heart failure following a heart attack.

The researchers also validated a test for use at the time of heart attack treatment to rule-in or rule-out heart muscle bleeding, and the likelihood of survival free of heart failure. This information would be useful to doctors to identify patients who are at risk of adverse outcome for more intensive treatment. The findings will pave the way to find new treatments to prevent bleeding following a heart attack and the subsequent onset of heart failure.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive scan, can be used after a heart attack to monitor heart muscle bleeding, which happens in phases. The first phase is in the 12 hours following a heart attack, and the second takes place within two to three days. This provides a window of opportunity to introduce treatments to prevent the second phase of bleeding, which could reduce or prevent the later onset of heart failure.

Prof. Colin Berry, from the University of Glasgow, who led the study said, “This research has provided us with a new understanding of heart muscle injury and how it develops. We can now focus our research on developing new treatments to reduce the level of this injury following a heart attack.

“The study has also presented a new way of identifying those at a higher risk of heart failure before the condition develops. This knowledge can be used to identify those most in need of interventions and monitoring earlier.”

For more information: www.bcs.com/conference

Related Content

Turkish Hospital Begins MR-Guided Radiation Therapy With Viewray MRIdian Linac
News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | September 21, 2018
ViewRay Inc. announced that Acibadem Maslak Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey has begun treating patients with ViewRay's...
Philips Showcases Integrated Solutions for Cardiovascular Care at TCT 2018
News | Cardiac Imaging | September 20, 2018
At the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting, Sept. 21–25 in San Diego, Philips is showcasing...
Machine Learning IDs Markers to Help Predict Alzheimer's

Neurologists use structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify changes in brain tissue (both gray and white matter) that are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. The MRI images are analyzed using morphometry and tractography techniques, which detect changes in the shape and dimensions of the brain and in the tissue microstructure, respectively. In this example, the images show the normal brain of an elderly patient. Image courtesy of Jiook Cha.

News | Neuro Imaging | September 20, 2018
New research has shown a combination of two different modes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer-based...
LVivo EF Cardiac Tool Now Available for GE Vscan Extend Handheld Mobile Ultrasound
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | September 19, 2018
DiA Imaging Analysis Ltd. (DiA), a provider of artificial intelligence (AI)-powered ultrasound analysis tools,...
Siemens Healthineers Announces First U.S. Install of Somatom go.Top CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | September 17, 2018
September 17, 2018 — The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus recently became the first healthcare
Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR. This innovation is the latest advance in the Ingenia MRI portfolio, which comprises fully-digital MRI systems, healthcare informatics and a range of maintenance and life cycle services for integrated solutions that empower a faster, smarter, and simpler path to enabling a confident diagnosis
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 14, 2018
Philips, a global leader in health technology, launched the Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR.
Veye Chest version 2
News | Lung Cancer | September 11, 2018
Aidence, an Amsterdam-based medical AI company, announced that Veye Chest version 2, a class IIa medical device, has
Sponsored Content | Case Study | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 07, 2018 | By Sabine Sartoretti, M.D.
As soon as the Compressed SENSE technology became available to the MRI team at Kantonsspital Winterthur (Switzerland),...
The Siemens Biograph Vision PET-CT system was released in mid-2018.

The Siemens Biograph Vision PET-CT system was released in mid-2018.

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | September 07, 2018 | By Dave Fornell
Nuclear imaging technology for both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography...

Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 06, 2018 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
According to the Prescient & Strategic Intelligence report, “Global Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Market Size,...