News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 25, 2015

C4 Imaging Awarded $1.3 Million NIH Grant For Prostate Imaging

The award will help fund the development of an enhanced multi-modality imaging marker 

MRI marker

C4 Imaging LLC today announced it has been awarded a $1.32 Million Phase II Small Business Innovation Research ("SBIR") grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health ("NIH"). Entitled "Multi-Modality MRI/CT Markers for Improved Assessment of Prostate Cancer," the Phase II SBIR award will help fund the development of an enhanced multi-modality imaging marker based on C4 Imaging's commercially available Sirius MRI Marker.

This is the second NIH SBIR award for C4 Imaging. C4 Imaging has successfully demonstrated a MRI Marker approach for radioactive seed localization that addresses the need to improve treatment assessment for men who undergo prostate brachytherapy. Sirius is FDA approved for implantation in prostate cancer patients being treated with radioactive seeds (brachytherapy). Its function is based on the unique paramagnetic properties of C4 Imaging's proprietary C4 solution. This core technology was awarded a US patent inSeptember 2013, with additional patent protection for further applications awarded in September 2014. An enhanced, multi-modality version of the device will allow clinicians to utilize multiple imaging modalities for optimal anatomical visualization to improve treatment planning and assessment across a range of diseases.

"This phase II SBIR award is a significant achievement for us," said Andrew Bright, president and CEO of C4 Imaging. "It provides over $1 Million to support the further development of our patented C4 technology. With this award, we can now accelerate our plans to develop additional MRI focused products for cancer patients within a large and growing MRI market."

The Phase II SBIR award will support a detailed development program; including product design, validation and manufacture, along with pre-clinical and clinical testing that will be performed in collaboration with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

For more information: www.c4imaging.com

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