News | June 30, 2009

ACR Launches Cardiac CT Certificate of Advanced Proficiency Exam

July 1, 2009 - On Sept. 9, 2009, the American College of Radiology (ACR) will offer the inaugural Cardiac CT Certificate of Advanced Proficiency (CCT CoAP) Examination open to all physicians who meet the requisite eligibility requirements and professional experience qualifications.

The rigorous examination, to be offered on a quarterly basis, will be given at the new ACR Education Center, the cutting-edge training and testing facility located on the campus of the ACR national headquarters in Reston, Va. The four-hour exam will contain both a practical, case-based component as well as a knowledge-based multiple-choice section.

Candidates will take the CCT CoAP exam on an individual workstation using the vendor software of their choice. Each workstation includes state-of-the art computer equipment, high-resolution monitors, fiber optic connectivity to highly secured servers, and high-performance proprietary testing software.

“Radiology practitioners who choose to pursue the CCT CoAP will appreciate this unique examination experience and will have made a considerable commitment to advancing their career objectives,” said James H. Thrall, M.D., FACR, chair of the ACR Board of Chancellors. “The ACR is proud to further the science of radiology education and provide a first-class opportunity for physicians to demonstrate to their patients, payers and communities that they are committed to providing the highest quality patient care.”

While it has been the ACR’s policy to recognize only radiology board certification that is also recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, the college acknowledges that some added certification may be required by payers and medical institutions in specific, highly specialized areas of radiology. The goal in providing this examination is to assist our members and others in documenting this additional training and expertise.

“This exam will allow physicians with considerable experience in cardiac CT to provide documentation to third-party payers, their institutions, and other stakeholders that they are proficient in this increasingly important area of medicine,” said ACR Chief Executive Officer Harvey L. Neiman, M.D., FACR. “The certificate will carry with it all of the prestige and recognition that comes with certification from the ACR.”

The examination is delivered to candidates in a completely computer-based format and includes both multiple-choice components and a simulated practice setting component whereby candidates conduct actual cardiac CT case assessments. The case components of the examination are administered via a large selection of vendor software chosen by the testing candidate.

“The Cardiac Computed Tomography Certificate of Advanced Proficiency Exam is a thorough and psychometrically sound exam, compiled by experts in the field of cardiac CT. It is a sterling opportunity for those who practice in this area to earn documentation signifying that they are proficient in this increasingly important area of medicine to payers and hospital credentialing boards. It also demonstrates to their patients that these physicians are expert practitioners of this rapidly evolving imaging technology,” said Geoffrey D. Rubin, M.D., chair of the ACR Cardiac Computed Tomography Certificate of Advanced Proficiency Committee.

For more information: www.acr.org

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