News | March 28, 2007

2007 Research Capitol Hill Days Work to Fund Musculoskeletal Research

march 29 - To increase awareness of the effects that musculoskeletal conditions have on individuals, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is sponsoring its 2007 Research Capitol Hill Days, this week, an event promoting federal funding for musculoskeletal research.

Today, orthopaedic surgeons, patients and researchers will meet with members of Congress and personally advocate for investments in the future of musculoskeletal care.

In recent years, Congress has increased the annual spending level of NAIMS to over $500 million. While appreciative of these efforts, the AAOS encourages Congress to take steps to increase the financial support for NAIMS to levels that reflect the prevalence and day-to-day impact of musculoskeletal diseases and conditions.

To achieve this, patients will accompany their physicians hoping Congress will appropriate an additional 6.7 percent in funding over fiscal year 2007. Approximately 30 patients along with 45 physicians and researchers will be speaking with legislators from their congressional districts and/or states about the need for increased musculoskeletal funding. The patients, ranging from children with bone cancer and brittle bone disease to adults with fragility fractures and traumatic onset paraplegia, will tell their personal stories, highlighting how advancements in orthopaedics have impacted their lives.

Related Content

Siemens Healthineers Demonstrates Artificial Intelligence, Healthcare Digitalization at HIMSS19
News | Artificial Intelligence | February 13, 2019
February 13, 2019 — At the 2019 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) global conference and e
Canon Adds Radiation Therapy Package to Aquilion Prime, Lightning CT Systems
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 11, 2019
In the patient-centric world of radiation oncology, it is critical that computed tomography (CT) simulation is...
Korean National Training Center Installs Carestream OnSight 3D Extremity System
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 07, 2019
Jincheon National Training Center in Jincheon, South Korea, installed a Carestream OnSight 3D Extremity System at its...
Canon Medical Debuts Alphenix 4-D CT at RSNA 2018
Technology | Angiography | February 06, 2019
Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. recently introduced a new angiography configuration featuring its Alphenix Sky + C-arm...
MaxQ AI's Accipio Software Integrated to GE's Smart Subscription Platform
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 29, 2019
MaxQ AI and GE Healthcare announced that MaxQ's Accipio artificial intelligence (AI) platform will now be a part of GE...
Siemens Healthineers Debuts AI-Rad Companion Chest CT
News | Artificial Intelligence | January 25, 2019
Siemens Healthineers presented its first intelligent software assistant for radiology, the AI-Rad Companion Chest CT,...
3-D Reconstruction of Ichthyosaurus Skull

A 3-D reconstruction of the ichthyosaurus skull from a computed tomography (CT) scan. Image courtesy of Nigel Larkin, taken at Royal Veterinary College, London.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 09, 2019
A nearly meter-long skull of a giant fossil marine ichthyosaur found in a farmer's field more than 60 years ago has...
SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2019
The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has released a new expert consensus document for computed...
Artificial Intelligence Pinpoints Nine Different Abnormalities in Head Scans

A brain scan (left) showing an intraparenchymal hemorrhage in left frontal region and a scan (right) of a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the left parietal region. Both conditions were accurately detected by the Qure.ai tool. Image courtesy of Nature Medicine.

News | Artificial Intelligence | January 07, 2019
The rise in the use of computed tomography (CT) scans in U.S. emergency rooms has been a well-documented trend1 in...
CT Technique Expands Possibilities of Imaging Ancient Remains
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | December 27, 2018
Researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) have successfully imaged the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian...