News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | June 14, 2018

Washington University in St. Louis Begins Clinical Treatments With ViewRay MRIdian Linac

Next-generation cancer therapy enables delivery of higher, potentially more effective radiation dose regimens

Washington University in St. Louis Begins Clinical Treatments With ViewRay MRIdian Linac

June 14, 2018 — The Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has begun treating patients with Viewray's second-generation magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided radiotherapy system, the MRIdian Linac. Siteman is the first U.S. cancer center to offer cancer therapy with both MRIdian and MRIdian Linac.

Washington University physicians and researchers at Siteman played an integral role in the development, testing and clinical introduction of MRIdian in 2012. The first cancer patients worldwide to receive MR-guided radiation therapy were treated at Siteman.

Unlike conventional radiotherapy, MRIdian Linac technology uses high-definition MR soft-tissue imaging to visualize and track the detailed contours of the tumor and adjacent healthy tissues. The enhanced visibility allows clinicians to quickly and dynamically adjust the prescribed radiation dose distribution when the tumor moves during the course of treatment. The combined capabilities provide clinicians with the tools to improve targeting precision and thus deliver higher and potentially more effective radiation doses, while simultaneously minimizing incidental radiation exposure to surrounding organs.

"We know that tumors and their surrounding anatomy naturally change position from day to day — even during treatment — making it vitally important that we see where the radiation dose is being delivered in real-time," said Jeff Bradley, M.D., the S. Lee Kling Professor of Radiation Oncology at Washington University. "The clarity and detail afforded by MRI combined with this new technology allows us to target tumors with a high level of accuracy regardless of changes or motion, further enabling us to expand our treatment options."

"As an institution actively involved in advancing MR image-guided therapy since the very beginning, we are excited to remain at the forefront with the addition of this latest innovation," said Jeff Michalski, M.D., professor and vice chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Washington University.

For more information: www.viewray.com

Related Content

A patient implanted with the Axonics System can undergo MRI examinations safely with radio frequency (RF) Transmit Body or Head Coil under the conditions outlined in the Axonics MRI Conditional Guidelines.

A patient implanted with the Axonics System can undergo MRI examinations safely with radio frequency (RF) Transmit Body or Head Coil under the conditions outlined in the Axonics MRI Conditional Guidelines.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 02, 2020
July 2, 2020 — Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc., a medical technology company that has developed and is commerci
This data represents wave 2 of a QuickPoLL survey conducted in partnership with an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 01, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Researchers reviewed results of prostate biopsies on over 3,400 men who had targets identified on prostate MRI and found that the positive predictive value of the test for prostate cancer was highly variable at different sites
News | Prostate Cancer | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Prostate MRI is an emerging technology used to identify and guide treatment for...
R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

R2* maps of healthy control participants and participants with Alzheimer disease. R2* maps are windowed between 10 and 50 sec21. Differences in iron concentration in basal ganglia are too small to allow visual separation between patients with Alzheimer disease and control participants, and iron levels strongly depend on anatomic structure and subject age. Image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | July 01, 2020
July 1, 2020 — Researchers using magnetic...
Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

News | Pediatric Imaging | June 29, 2020
June 29, 2020 — A type of smart magnetic r...
This image of DCE-MRI reveals persistent blood brain barrier disorder in American football players. Using brain imaging techniques and analytical methods, researchers can determine whether football players have CTE by measuring leakage of the blood-brain barrier. Image courtesy of Ben-Gurion University

This image of DCE-MRI reveals persistent blood brain barrier disorder in American football players. Using brain imaging techniques and analytical methods, researchers can determine whether football players have CTE by measuring leakage of the blood-brain barrier. Image courtesy of Ben-Gurion University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 22, 2020
June 22, 2020 — Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease caused by repeated...
News | Proton Therapy | June 16, 2020
June 17, 2020 — RaySearch Laboratories AB launched the latest release of its widely adopted treatment planning system
Axial FLAIR in four different COVID-19 patients. A) 58-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR hyperintensities located in the left medial temporal lobe. B) 66-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR ovoid hyperintense lesion located in the central part of the splenium of the corpus callosum. C) 71-year old woman with pathological wakefulness after sedation: extensive and confluent supratentorial white matter FLAIR hyperintensities (arrows). Association with leptomeningeal enhancement (stars

Axial FLAIR in four different COVID-19 patients. A) 58-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR hyperintensities located in the left medial temporal lobe. B) 66-year old man with impaired consciousness: FLAIR ovoid hyperintense lesion located in the central part of the splenium of the corpus callosum. C) 71-year old woman with pathological wakefulness after sedation: extensive and confluent supratentorial white matter FLAIR hyperintensities (arrows). Association with leptomeningeal enhancement (stars) D) 61-year old man with confusion: hyperintense lesions involving both middle cerebellar peduncles. Image courtesy of the journal Radiology

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 16, 2020
June 16, 2020 — Current data on central nervous system (CNS) involvement in...