Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | December 13, 2017

Toshiba Medical Introduces Aquilion Prime SP CT System at RSNA 2017

Aquilion Prime SP features enhanced workflow capabilities and premium imaging technology for every patient

Toshiba Medical Introduces Aquilion Prime SP CT System at RSNA 2017

December 13, 2017 — Toshiba Medical, a Canon Group company, introduced its new Aquilion Prime SP computed tomography (CT) system at the 2017 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Annual Meeting, Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago. The CT system features advanced imaging technology from Toshiba Medical’s high-end CT systems, giving clinicians the right balance between image quality and lower dose for every patient from pediatric to bariatric.

The new Aquilion Prime SP can generate 160 unique slices per rotation with 0.35-second scanning, reducing time required to diagnosis. The system also features a 78-cm aperture gantry and a 660-pound patient-weight-capacity couch, making it an ideal solution for use in emergency scanning or bariatric patient studies, according to Toshiba. An optimized beam spectrum and a more an efficient detector based on PUREViSION Optics, provides the Aquilion Prime SP with reduced dose by up to 31 percent and improved LCD for the body (22 percent) and brain (19 percent). The system can help improve workflow with three-phase Variable Helical Pitch (vHP3), which easily combines gated and non-gated optimized SUREExposure and Helical Pitch settings all within a single helical scan. To help minimize repeat cardiac imaging scans, the system features SURECardio Helical Prospective, which adapts to patients’ heart rate automatically, even overcoming unexpected arrhythmia.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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