News | Radiology Imaging | November 13, 2018

Researchers Awarded 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Grants

Awards to five individuals will fund major research in the radiologic sciences

Researchers Awarded 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Grants

November 13, 2018 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research & Education (R&E) Foundation recently announced the five recipients of its joint research grants with Canon Medical Systems USA for 2018. The 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Seed Grants were awarded to Pedram Heidari, M.D., Prashant Nagpal, M.D., and Adam Singer, M.D. The 2018 Canon Medical Systems USA Research Medical Student Grants went to Brandon Kenneth-Kouso Fields, BA, BM, and Anthony D. Yao, BS. These grants are made possible by Canon Medical Systems USA’s support of the RSNA R&E Foundation.

The Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Seed Grant provides $40,000 for a one-year project to test hypotheses and obtain pilot data in preparation for major grant applications:

  • Pedram Heidari, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital, will investigate a novel positron emission tomography (PET) probe for imaging of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in mouse models. This PET probe is specific for granzyme B which is an important marker of T cell activation involved in pathogenies of IBD. Clinical translation of this imaging method, if successful, could potentially improve management and treatment of IBD;
  • Prashant Nagpal, M.D., University of Iowa, with scientific advisor Mathews Jacob, Ph.D., will investigate whether 3-D self-navigated free-breathing cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences using manifold reconstruction algorithms compare well with the standard of care breath-held CMR sequences for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). If successful, this free-breathing CMR technique will allow high-quality comprehensive imaging in patients that cannot hold their breath; and
  • Adam Singer, M.D., Emory University, will compare the performance of a novel sonographic scoring and reporting system to MRI for soft tissue sarcoma resection bed surveillance. If sonographic diagnostic accuracy is non-inferior to MRI, it could provide a more cost effective surveillance alternative particularly when MRI is contraindicated or degraded by artifacts.

The Canon Medical Systems USA/RSNA Research Medical Student Grant provides a $3,000 stipend, matched by the department for a total of $6,000 to pursue a research project in the radiologic sciences:

  • Brandon Kenneth-Kouso “K.K.” Fields, BA, BM, University of Southern California, with scientific advisor George R. Matcuk Jr., M.D., will investigate the role of quantitative whole tumor volume MRI as a novel biomarker in evaluating response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy in soft-tissue sarcomas. The principles developed with this project may lend new insight into early observable changes seen in this heterogeneous class of tumors to more accurately guide clinical management; and
  • Anthony D. Yao, B.S., Rhode Island Hospital, with scientific advisor Ryan A. McTaggart, M.D., will investigate whether artificial intelligence can assist in the imaging of emergent large vessel occlusions (ELVOs) on computed tomography (CT) angiograms. If successful, neural networks may be implemented to aid radiologists in decreasing diagnostic time and improving patient outcomes.

The RSNA R&E Foundation Board of Trustees approved funding for $4 million in radiology research and education grants this year, achieving a funding rate of 35 percent of grant applicants. “The R&E Foundation is grateful for Canon Medical Systems USA’s support of the 2018 grant recipients. This longstanding partnership and commitment is a vital component in ensuring research innovation and seeding the future of radiology,” said N. Reed Dunnick, M.D., chair of the R&E Foundation Board of Trustees.

For more information: www.rsna.org/foundation, www.us.medical.canon

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