News | Angiography | December 04, 2017

Philips Azurion Platform Improves Clinical Workflow and Staff Experience Benefits

Two year-study finds clinicians’ use of Azurion enabled significant reductions in procedure time, in-lab patient preparation time, post-procedure lab time and enhanced staff experience

Philips Azurion Platform Improves Clinical Workflow and Staff Experience Benefits

December 4, 2017 — Philips recently announced the results of a comprehensive, independent, two-year study demonstrating the clinical workflow benefits of its next-generation image-guided therapy platform, Azurion. The study investigated nearly 800 patient procedures to evaluate the impact of Azurion at St. Antonius Hospital in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The data demonstrated clinicians’ use of Azurion resulted in significant time savings for the hospital, including a 17 percent reduction of the average interventional procedure time, a 12 percent reduction of in-lab patient preparation time, and a 28 percent reduction of post-procedure lab time.

“As the use of image-guided therapies continue to rise, new systems need to be easy and intuitive to use so clinicians can quickly and efficiently move through procedures,” said Marco van Strijen, M.D., interventional radiologist, St. Antonius Hospital. “With the Azurion system, we were able to change our workflow in such a way that we now can do more patients in a single day, resulting in more patients a week, resulting in more patients per year, with no compromise to patient safety or quality of care.”

Overall, the improvements achieved with Azurion will give St. Antonius Hospital the ability to treat one more patient per day – on an average of 6 to 8 patients per day, to help hundreds more patients each year. The reduced preparation, procedure and lab time resulted in fewer planned cases finishing after normal working hours and higher employee satisfaction. St. Antonius Hospital, treating more than 93,000 patients annually, was among the first hospitals to install Azurion and participated in this comprehensive study to evaluate the impact of the new platform and its clinical workflow on their department.

Azurion is Philips’ next generation image-guided therapy platform and the new core of its integrated image-guided therapy solutions portfolio. Azurion supports a full range of configurations across a broad spectrum of image-guided therapy procedures. It helps physicians perform interventional procedures through an intuitive interface and easy-to-use controls for clinical image capture, decreasing procedure times and allowing for more accurate scheduling of patients. Additionally, Azurion makes it easier for staff to anticipate and see the information they need, when they need it, helping procedures flow more efficiently and easily.

“The success achieved was possible due to the deep and trusted partnership we have with Philips,” said Wout Adema, member of the Santeon Procurement Board and Chief Financial Officer, St. Antonius Hospital. “The Azurion installation provided our interventional team the opportunity to evaluate our existing processes and standardize workflows. This helped us make tangible and significant operational improvements in the short-term, and fostered a continuous improvement culture amongst the team. The positive impact on patient and staff satisfaction further contributes to our reputation as a leading vascular institute.”

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare

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