News | Cardiac Imaging | February 14, 2017

NICE Guidance Recommends HeartFlow FFRct Analysis for Patients With Stable Chest Pain

U.K. committee concludes technology is safe, highly accurate and cost-effective solution for non-invasive evaluation

HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, NICE guidance, U.K., United Kingdom, guidelines, stable chest pain

February 14, 2017 — The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom recently issued guidance for use of the HeartFlow FFRct (fractional flow reserve computed tomography) Analysis to help determine the cause of stable chest pain in patients. Developed by HeartFlow Inc., the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis is the first non-invasive technology to provide insight into both the extent of coronary artery disease and the impact that disease has on blood flow to the heart, enabling clinicians to select an appropriate treatment.

NICE recommends the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis for patients with stable recent onset chest pain. Based on the evidence, it concluded the technology is safe, has a high level of diagnostic accuracy and may avoid the need for invasive coronary angiography. The committee further concluded that, when compared to all other tests, use of the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis could save the U.K. National Health Service approximately £214 per patient through avoiding unnecessary invasive tests and treatment.

The new guidance follows chest pain guidelines issued by NICE in November 2016, recommending non-invasive coronary CT angiography (cCTA) as the initial diagnostic test for patients with stable chest pain. NICE now recommends the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis as the most cost-effective option when additional information is needed by the clinician.

HeartFlow’s process starts with data from a standard, non-invasive cCTA. Leveraging deep learning, an advanced form of artificial intelligence, HeartFlow creates a personalized, 3-D model of each patient’s arteries. Powerful computer algorithms then solve millions of complex equations to simulate blood flow and assess the impact of blockages in the arteries. With this actionable information, physicians can determine the right course of action for each patient.

“The HeartFlow FFRct Analysis provides a definitive understanding of both the anatomical and functional findings, without any additional testing or risk for patients,” said Joseph Mills, M.D., Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital. “Application of the Heartflow FFRct Analysis is likely to transform the quality of care we can provide for patients, ensuring the most accurate diagnosis and the best treatment plan, as well reducing the need for invasive coronary angiography – a procedure not without its risks.”

Read the article “Clinical Applications of FFR-CT.”

VIDEO: Early U.S. Experience With FFR-CT in Evaluating ED Chest Pain Presentation

Read the article “One-Year PLATFORM Trial Results Reinforce Benefits of FFR-CT.”

Related Content

It covers every major modality, including breast imaging/mammography, fixed and portable C-arms (cath, IR/angio, hybrid, OR), CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, radiographic fluoroscopy, ultrasound and X-ray
News | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2020
July 29, 2020 — IMV Medical Information, part of Scien...
Left, a 3-D rendering of a heart from a cardiac CT exam. Right, a lung-CT exam showing the heart and ground glass lesions in the lungs of a COVID-19 patient. CT has become a front-line imaging modality in the COVID era because it offers both cardiac and lung information to help determine a patients disposition with chest pain, COVID-19 and COVID-caused myocarditis and pulmonary embolism. #COVID19 #CCTfirst #YesCCT

Left, a 3-D rendering of a heart from a cardiac CT exam. Right, a lung-CT exam showing the heart and ground glass lesions in the lungs of a COVID-19 patient. CT has become a front-line imaging modality in the COVID era because it offers both cardiac and lung information to help determine a patients disposition with chest pain, COVID-19 and COVID-caused myocarditis and pulmonary embolism.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 28, 2020
July 28, 2020 — The use of cardiova...
ams Commended by United Imaging for Accelerated Supply of Unprecedented Levels of Essential CT Detectors to Fight Covid-19 (SARS-CoV-2)
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 28, 2020
July 28, 2020 — ams, a leading worldwide supplier of high performance sensor solutions, has been thanked by long-term
A cardiac CT of a patient with pacemaker leads, which can be challenging to get good images due to metal artifact. This image was rendered from using Canon's AiCE AI-assisted interactive reconstruction with Global Illumination 3-D rendering from a scan on an Aquilion One Genesis SP system.

A cardiac CT of a patient with pacemaker leads, which can be challenging to get good images due to metal artifact. This image was rendered from using Canon's AiCE AI-assisted interactive reconstruction with Global Illumination 3-D rendering from a scan on an Aquilion One Genesis SP system.

Feature | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 27, 2020
There has been tremendous growth in the field of cardiovascular...
Zebra Medical Vision announced its sixth FDA 510(k) clearance for its mammography solution, HealthMammo, which has already received a CE mark. Zebra Medical’s algorithm empowers breast radiologists by prioritizing and identifying suspicious mammograms, providing a safety net for radiologists. The suspicious mammograms are identified faster and read earlier than the current “first-in first-out” standard of care. 
News | Breast Imaging | July 27, 2020
July 26, 2020 —  Zebra Medical Vision announced its sixth FDA 510
(a) A schematic of cycloidal computed tomography (not to scale, seen from top); by adding an array of beam stops in front of the detector, the setup is transformed into an edge-illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging device. (b) A sinogram sampling grid for a rotation-only scheme. (c) A sinogram sampling grid for a cycloidal scheme. The grids are shown for one mask period and a subset of rotation angles; the combination of empty and filled circles shows the grids that would be achieved through fine latera

(a) A schematic of cycloidal computed tomography (not to scale, seen from top); by adding an array of beam stops in front of the detector, the setup is transformed into an edge-illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging device. (b) A sinogram sampling grid for a rotation-only scheme. (c) A sinogram sampling grid for a cycloidal scheme. The grids are shown for one mask period and a subset of rotation angles; the combination of empty and filled circles shows the grids that would be achieved through fine lateral sampling (requiring dithering); the filled circles show the data that are sampled without dithering.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 24, 2020
July 24, 2020 — A computed tomography (CT) sca
The new Aquilion One Genesis SP cardiac CT system uses artificial intelligence to help reconstruct low dose cardiac CT images. #SCCT2020

The new Aquilion One Genesis SP cardiac CT system uses artificial intelligence to help reconstruct low dose cardiac CT images.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 20, 2020
July 20, 2020 – To meet the growing cardiovascular imaging needs of healthcare systems, Canon Medical Systems USA is
"Our study demonstrates that a real-world lung cancer screening can perform similar to randomized controlled trials in regard to important performance metrics," the UPenn authors of this AJR article concluded. Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

"Our study demonstrates that a real-world lung cancer screening can perform similar to randomized controlled trials in regard to important performance metrics," the UPenn authors of this AJR article concluded. Image courtesy of American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Lung Imaging | July 17, 2020
July 17, 2020 — An online first accepted...